I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

by

Maryse Condé

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem can help.
Abigail (whose full name, historical records reveal, is Abigail Williams) is the teenaged niece of Samuel Parris and the central figure behind the witchcraft panic. As the leader of the young women in Salem, Abigail presses Tituba for stories about the devil and then uses these stories to accuse Tituba and several other women in the town. Abigail often pretends to be possessed, causing Tituba to fear “the power of her imagination.” In Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible, another famous text about the Salem witch trials, Abigail is the primary antagonist.

Abigail Quotes in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem quotes below are all either spoken by Abigail or refer to Abigail . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
).
Part 1: Chapter 6 Quotes

I cannot describe the effect this unfortunate black cat had on the children, as well as on Elizabeth and Samuel. Samuel Parris seized his prayer book and began to recite a seemingly endless prayer […] Abigail asked, holding her breath: “Aunt, it was the devil, wasn't it?”

“What will you think up next? It was only an animal that was disturbed by our arrival. Why do you keep talking about the devil? The invisible world around us only torments us if we provoke it.”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Abigail (speaker), Elizabeth Parris , Samuel Parris
Related Symbols: Black Cats
Page Number: 44
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem LitChart as a printable PDF.
I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem PDF

Abigail Character Timeline in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The timeline below shows where the character Abigail appears in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1: Chapter 6
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Tituba meets Abigail, Parris’s teenaged niece, and Betsey, his young daughter; she reflects that these girls have lost... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...they are about to have sex to force them to pray (alongside Elizabeth, Betsey, and Abigail). When Tituba does not want to confess her private thoughts, Parris slaps her—and when Elizabeth... (full context)
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Though Tituba feels an instant distrust for Abigail, she forms strong friendships with Elizabeth and Betsey. Tituba tells the two women stories, braids... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 7
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
...all the women quiet and anxious. Only when he goes for a midday walk do Abigail and Betsey get to be their full selves, playing games and dancing. Sometimes, Tituba takes... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...into a panic, as she recalls her own mother’s fate. But when Tituba breaks down, Abigail calmly states that the hanging woman “only got what she deserved. She’s a witch.” Tituba... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 8
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...of a lake. Tituba teaches the tune to Betsey, and she is surprised to hear Abigail humming it as well. However, Tituba reflects that Abigail is indeed “but a child,” and... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 9
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...wander the streets. Tituba, John, and the Parris family arrive at their new home, and Abigail runs into the house, excited to explore. Parris chastises her for this burst of energy,... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...teenage girls in the town (especially Anne Putnam and her servant, Mercy Lewis). Led by Abigail, these girls push Tituba for stories about the devil. Tituba pities these girls, because she... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...Osborne, a wealthy woman who is mocked because of a sexual incident in her past. Abigail presses Tituba to name Elizabeth Proctor, but Tituba will not. (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 10
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
After a few weeks in which Abigail, Betsey, and their friends become increasingly obsessed with magic, Betsey turns rigid and falls ill.... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...morning, when Tituba approaches to serve the Parris family breakfast, Betsey begins screaming inhuman screams. Abigail takes in the situation for a moment, and then she makes a calculated decision to... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 11
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
...found guilty of magic, she will be hanged. But before Griggs can arrive, Betsey and Abigail have another fit, once again drawing the attention of all of the neighbors. When Tituba... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 12
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...has turned against her. When Griggs goes to investigate the situation, he asks Betsey and Abigail to take off their clothes, which is very difficult for both of them. However, Griggs... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 4
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...even Rebecca Nurse—one of the most respected villagers in the entire parish—has been accused by Abigail and young Anne Putnam. If Goodwife Nurse can be taken down, Tituba fears even more... (full context)
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...that he has changed, becoming cunning and manipulative. He reveals that he has joined with Abigail in accusing townspeople of witchcraft. Tituba is “appalled,” but she also has to face the... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 7
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...Indian is now one of the town’s main accusers, often being even more aggressive than Abigail and Anne. (full context)