I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

by

Maryse Condé

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Christopher Character Analysis

Christopher is the leader of a group of maroons living high in the hills of Barbados. Having heard of Tituba’s healing powers, and inspired by the legend of the invulnerable maroon Ti-Noel, Christopher hopes that Tituba will make him immortal; she agrees to try, and the two become lovers. But Tituba is unable to prevent Christopher from dying—because “death is a door nobody can lock”—and their relationship sours. Soon after, Tituba learns that she is pregnant with Christopher’s child, though given his coldness towards her, she decides she does not want him in her child’s life.
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Christopher Character Timeline in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The timeline below shows where the character Christopher appears in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 2: Chapter 12
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Christopher, the leader of the maroons, asks Tituba if she does have powers, and she explains... (full context)
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Tituba explains to Christopher that “death is a door that nobody can lock,” and she fights her desire for... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 13
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...the evil that permeates so much of human society. She heads home, where she informs Christopher that she is unable to make him invincible. But while Tituba wants to fight the... (full context)
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...think of the babies she and Hester aborted. Then, a few weeks later, Tituba and Christopher become lovers, though she cannot quite shake her pleasurable memories of John Indian. (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Christopher begins to confide in Tituba, revealing that the maroons do not have enough weapons to... (full context)
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...would have done much more, including ending slavery entirely. These comments are reported back to Christopher, who demeans Tituba, telling her she does not deserve to be treated as “special.” After... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 14
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
...surprise, realizes that she is pregnant. Although she is not happy about the fact that Christopher is the father, she is very excited to have a baby, and she immediately begins... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Iphigene also asks Tituba to go to Christopher to prevent the maroons from interfering; he explains that the maroons actually benefit from a... (full context)
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
That night, Tituba dreams that Christopher, John Indian, and Samuel Parris come into her room like “three birds of prey” and... (full context)
Epilogue
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Tituba has finished her “bitter” story, but she wants readers to know that Christopher was incorrect—“there is a song about Tituba!” She hears this song in the plants rustling... (full context)