I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

by

Maryse Condé

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Elizabeth Parris Character Analysis

Elizabeth Parris is the quiet, sickly wife of Samuel Parris. As they travel to Boston and then to Salem, Elizabeth and Tituba connect over their shared hatred of Parris; Elizabeth is especially resentful of her husband’s refusal to acknowledge sex and sexuality as vital parts of life. But though Tituba invests deeply in her friendship with Elizabeth—at one point, even saving her life when she is about to succumb to sickness—Elizabeth extends no such courtesy. Instead, once her daughter Betsey begins to have seizures, Elizabeth joins the ranks of the white Puritans accusing Tituba of witchcraft. Elizabeth’s betrayal of Tituba is one of the most painful in the entire narrative.

Elizabeth Parris Quotes in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem quotes below are all either spoken by Elizabeth Parris or refer to Elizabeth Parris . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
).
Part 1: Chapter 6 Quotes

I cannot describe the effect this unfortunate black cat had on the children, as well as on Elizabeth and Samuel. Samuel Parris seized his prayer book and began to recite a seemingly endless prayer […] Abigail asked, holding her breath: “Aunt, it was the devil, wasn't it?”

“What will you think up next? It was only an animal that was disturbed by our arrival. Why do you keep talking about the devil? The invisible world around us only torments us if we provoke it.”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Abigail (speaker), Elizabeth Parris , Samuel Parris
Related Symbols: Black Cats
Page Number: 44
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 9 Quotes

How could their yearning and nostalgia possibly be compared to mine? What they yearned for was the sweetness of a gentler life, the life of white women who were served and waited on by attentive slaves. Even if the reverend Mr. Parris had ended up losing all his wealth and hopes, the life they had spent there was composed of luxury and voluptuousness. And what did I yearn for? The subtle joys of being a slave. The cakes made out of crumbs from the stale bread of life. The fleeting moments of forbidden games.

We did not belong to the same universe, Goodwife Parris, Betsey, and I, and all the affection in the world could not change that.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Elizabeth Parris , Betsey Parris , Samuel Parris
Page Number: 63
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem LitChart as a printable PDF.
I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem PDF

Elizabeth Parris Character Timeline in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The timeline below shows where the character Elizabeth Parris appears in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1: Chapter 6
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
While she travels to America, Tituba gets to know Parris’s sickly wife Elizabeth; they bond because Elizabeth seems to hate Parris almost as much as Tituba does. But... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...and John when they are about to have sex to force them to pray (alongside Elizabeth, Betsey, and Abigail). When Tituba does not want to confess her private thoughts, Parris slaps... (full context)
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Though Tituba feels an instant distrust for Abigail, she forms strong friendships with Elizabeth and Betsey. Tituba tells the two women stories, braids their hair, and helps them deal... (full context)
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
That night, Parris wakes Tituba up, informing her that he believes Elizabeth is about to die. Tituba decides to use some of Mama Yaya’s techniques to bring... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 9
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
...Parris has Black people working for him, and she is also curious about what makes Elizabeth so ill. Goodwife Sibley tells Tituba that two women (the wives of the previous ministers)... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...is mocked because of a sexual incident in her past. Abigail presses Tituba to name Elizabeth Proctor, but Tituba will not. (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...a bowl with water and imagines the bowl is Barbados. The sympathy she feels for Elizabeth and Betsey fades when she realizes that their pain is different; they long for an... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 10
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...horrified to see that, even after all the care she has showered on young Betsey, Elizabeth blames her for this sickness. (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...moment, and then she makes a calculated decision to join Betsey in the screaming. When Elizabeth outright accuses Tituba, Tituba reminds her of all the times she has been a healing... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 4
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...she does not see the wave of accusations that sweep Salem. A few weeks later, Elizabeth Parris comes to apologize. As soon as she has said sorry, however, Elizabeth shares her... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
From Elizabeth, Tituba learns that even Rebecca Nurse—one of the most respected villagers in the entire parish—has... (full context)