I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

by

Maryse Condé

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Samuel Parris is the brutal, hypocritical minister of Salem. After purchasing Tituba and John Indian as slaves from Susanna Endicott, Parris brings them to New England; from the moment she meets him, Tituba is horrified by him, comparing him variously to a “bird of prey” and to Satan himself. Though he claims to be a man of God, Parris is actually more concerned with profiting off of the villagers of Salem than he is with saving their souls. Perhaps more than any other character in the novel, then, Parris epitomizes what John Indian calls “the hypocrisy of the white man’s world,” in which even the most outwardly religious people are capable of great prejudice and cruelty.

Samuel Parris Quotes in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem quotes below are all either spoken by Samuel Parris or refer to Samuel Parris . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
).
Part 1: Chapter 4 Quotes

In the early afternoon a man came to see [Susanna], a man such as I had never seen in the streets of Bridgetown, nor for that matter anywhere else. Tall, very tall, dressed in black from head to foot, with a chalky white skin […] I have already said much about the eyes of Susanna Endicott, but these! Imagine greenish, cold eyes, scheming and wily, creating evil because they saw it everywhere. It was as if I had come face to face with a snake or some evil, wicked reptile. I was immediately convinced that this Satan we heard so much about must stare in the same way at people he wishes to lead astray.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Samuel Parris
Page Number: 34
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 6 Quotes

I cannot describe the effect this unfortunate black cat had on the children, as well as on Elizabeth and Samuel. Samuel Parris seized his prayer book and began to recite a seemingly endless prayer […] Abigail asked, holding her breath: “Aunt, it was the devil, wasn't it?”

“What will you think up next? It was only an animal that was disturbed by our arrival. Why do you keep talking about the devil? The invisible world around us only torments us if we provoke it.”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Abigail (speaker), Elizabeth Parris , Samuel Parris
Related Symbols: Black Cats
Page Number: 44
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 9 Quotes

How could their yearning and nostalgia possibly be compared to mine? What they yearned for was the sweetness of a gentler life, the life of white women who were served and waited on by attentive slaves. Even if the reverend Mr. Parris had ended up losing all his wealth and hopes, the life they had spent there was composed of luxury and voluptuousness. And what did I yearn for? The subtle joys of being a slave. The cakes made out of crumbs from the stale bread of life. The fleeting moments of forbidden games.

We did not belong to the same universe, Goodwife Parris, Betsey, and I, and all the affection in the world could not change that.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Elizabeth Parris , Betsey Parris , Samuel Parris
Page Number: 63
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem LitChart as a printable PDF.
I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem PDF

Samuel Parris Character Timeline in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The timeline below shows where the character Samuel Parris appears in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1: Chapter 4
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Still, Susanna is firm that John and Tituba will belong to this new slaveholder, Samuel Parris—and worse still, that they will follow him to America. And even if Tituba could avoid... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 5
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
On board a ship, Parris pours ice-cold water on Tituba and John and formally marries them. Tituba feels that she... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 6
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
While she travels to America, Tituba gets to know Parris’s sickly wife Elizabeth; they bond because Elizabeth seems to hate Parris almost as much as... (full context)
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Tituba meets Abigail, Parris’s teenaged niece, and Betsey, his young daughter; she reflects that these girls have lost their... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
At night, Parris interrupts Tituba and John when they are about to have sex to force them to... (full context)
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...helps them deal with their various sicknesses. Eventually, Tituba realizes that Elizabeth is pregnant, which Parris does not seem aware of. Elizabeth explains that Parris never looks at her body, and... (full context)
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
That night, Parris wakes Tituba up, informing her that he believes Elizabeth is about to die. Tituba decides... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 7
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Tituba and John spend the year in Boston while Parris tries to find a parish that will hire him. John gets a job at a... (full context)
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Back in the house, Parris is always around, making all the women quiet and anxious. Only when he goes for... (full context)
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...successfully aborts her baby, though she feels very conflicted about this decision. Summer approaches, and Parris announces that he has gotten a job in the small village of Salem. Unfortunately, Salem... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 9
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...there are less than 2,000 people, and cows wander the streets. Tituba, John, and the Parris family arrive at their new home, and Abigail runs into the house, excited to explore.... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
...Sibley greets them on behalf of the congregation. Goodwife Sibley is surprised to learn that Parris has Black people working for him, and she is also curious about what makes Elizabeth... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...Salem, including John Proctor and Anne Putnam, come to greet (and do some snooping around) Parris. While Parris hems and haws over the specifics of his salary, Tituba and John celebrate... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 10
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Tituba learns more about Parris’s religion, in which every strange occurrence or mishap is blamed on Satan. Tituba recalls from... (full context)
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Tituba’s knowledge of the villagers’ worst impulses unsettles her. Worse still, Parris hires John out to a neighbor, meaning Tituba barely ever gets to see or sleep... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
The next morning, when Tituba approaches to serve the Parris family breakfast, Betsey begins screaming inhuman screams. Abigail takes in the situation for a moment,... (full context)
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...screaming disturbs the neighbors, who rush over to see what is going on in the Parris house. As Parris tries to reassure them that nothing is wrong, Tituba resolves to give... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 11
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Parris tells Tituba that he has brought in a witchcraft specialist named Dr. Griggs to assess... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 12
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...of them. However, Griggs sees no marks of witchcraft on their bodies. He therefore asks Parris to bring in a more qualified expert to consult with. (full context)
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Parris again threatens Tituba with hanging, and she tells him to accuse Mary Sibley, not her;... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 1
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...to try Tituba. Tituba defends her innocence, but her anxiety makes her voice sound shaky. Parris presents the youngest and most seemingly vulnerable of the accusers to the ministers. They begin... (full context)
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Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Like “birds of prey,” Parris and the other ministers tie Tituba down and command that she confess to witchcraft and... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 3
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
...blindness, just as Hester had instructed her to do. At the end of Tituba’s testimony, Parris congratulates her on a job well done, telling her, “you understood what we expected of... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 14
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Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
That night, Tituba dreams that Christopher, John Indian, and Samuel Parris come into her room like “three birds of prey” and assault her. She wakes up... (full context)