I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

by

Maryse Condé

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Tituba Character Analysis

Tituba, the daughter of an Ashanti woman named Abena and the white man who assaulted her, is the protagonist of Maryse Condé’s novel. After losing both her mother and her adoptive father Yao at a young age, Tituba finds a home in the swamps of Barbados with Mama Yaya, a local healer, who teaches her how to form potions and communicate with the dead. Tituba’s life is disrupted when she falls in love with a handsome man named John Indian, who pulls her into plantation life; eventually, Tituba is forced into slavery and brought to Salem, Massachusetts by a minister named Samuel Parris. Because she is such a skilled healer and because of the prejudice that runs so deep in Salem, many of the villagers (led by the teenaged Abigail) immediately associate Tituba with the devil. After being accused and nearly executed as a witch in the infamous Salem witch trials, Tituba strikes up relationships with an outspoken woman named Hester and Benjamin d’Azevedo, a kindly Jewish merchant. Eventually, Tituba makes her way back to Barbados, where she is killed in the process of planning a slave revolt. Yet despite this life filled with trauma, Tituba remains gentle and forgiving, in part because she does not want to become like most of the white people around her, “knowing only how to do evil.” Even amidst her growing awareness of anti-Blackness and misogyny makes it harder and harder for her to stay hopeful, Tituba is able to find moments of love, passion, and joy, however fleeting. And after her death, Tituba’s loving presence remains in the memories of those she helped to heal, persisting in “the crackling of a fire between four stones, the rainbow-hued babbling of the river,” and Condé’s novel itself.

Tituba Quotes in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem quotes below are all either spoken by Tituba or refer to Tituba. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
).
Part 1: Chapter 1 Quotes

Mama Yaya taught me about herbs. Those for inducing sleep. Those for healing wounds and ulcers. Those for loosening the tongues of thieves. Those that calm epileptics and plunge them into blissful rest. Those that put words of hope on the lips of the angry, the desperate, and the suicidal.

Mama Yaya taught me to listen to the wind rising and to measure its force as it swirled above the cabins it had the power to crash.

Mama Yaya had taught me the sea, the mountains, and the hills. She taught me that everything lives, has a soul, and breathes. That everything must be respected. That man is not the master riding through his Kingdom on horseback.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Mama Yaya
Related Symbols: Tropical Plants
Page Number: 9
Explanation and Analysis:

The dead only die if they die in our hearts. They live on if we cherish them and honor their memory, if we place their favorite delicacies in life on their graves, and if we kneel down regularly to commune with them. They are all around us, eager for attention, eager for affection. A few words are enough to conjure them back and to have their invisible bodies pressed against ours in their eagerness to make themselves useful.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Mama Yaya, Abena
Page Number: 10
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 2 Quotes

“Mama Yaya,” I said, panting. “I want this man to love me.”

She shook her head. “Men do not love. They possess. They subjugate.”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Mama Yaya (speaker), John Indian
Page Number: 14
Explanation and Analysis:

What is a witch? I noticed that when he said the word, it was marked with disapproval. Why should that be? Why? Isn't the ability to communicate with the invisible world, to keep constant links with the dead, to care for others and heal, a superior gift of nature that inspires respect, admiration, and gratitude? Consequently, shouldn't the witch […] be cherished and revered rather than feared?

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), John Indian , Mama Yaya, Susanna Endicott
Page Number: 17
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 3 Quotes

John Indian closed the door with a wooden latch and took me in his arms, whispering: “The duty of a slave is to survive! Do you understand? To survive!”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), John Indian (speaker), Susanna Endicott , Mama Yaya, Abena
Page Number: 22
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 4 Quotes

In the early afternoon a man came to see [Susanna], a man such as I had never seen in the streets of Bridgetown, nor for that matter anywhere else. Tall, very tall, dressed in black from head to foot, with a chalky white skin […] I have already said much about the eyes of Susanna Endicott, but these! Imagine greenish, cold eyes, scheming and wily, creating evil because they saw it everywhere. It was as if I had come face to face with a snake or some evil, wicked reptile. I was immediately convinced that this Satan we heard so much about must stare in the same way at people he wishes to lead astray.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Samuel Parris
Page Number: 34
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 6 Quotes

I cannot describe the effect this unfortunate black cat had on the children, as well as on Elizabeth and Samuel. Samuel Parris seized his prayer book and began to recite a seemingly endless prayer […] Abigail asked, holding her breath: “Aunt, it was the devil, wasn't it?”

“What will you think up next? It was only an animal that was disturbed by our arrival. Why do you keep talking about the devil? The invisible world around us only torments us if we provoke it.”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Abigail (speaker), Elizabeth Parris , Samuel Parris
Related Symbols: Black Cats
Page Number: 44
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 7 Quotes

“There are two Indians working at the Black Horse. If you could see how they are treated. They told me how they were deprived of their land, how the white man destroyed their herds and gave them ‘fire water,’ which sends a man to his grave in next to no time period. Ah, white folks!”

These stories puzzled me and I tried to understand. “Perhaps it's because they have done so much harm to their fellow beings, to some because their skin is black, to others because their skin is red, that they have such a strong feeling of being damned?”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), John Indian (speaker)
Page Number: 44
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 8 Quotes

Lament for my lost child

The moonstone dropped into the water,

Into the waters of the river,

And my fingers couldn’t reach it,

Woe is me!

The moonstone has fallen.

Sitting on a rock on the riverbank,

I wept and I lamented.

Oh, softly shining stone,

Glimmering at the bottom of the water.

The hunter passed that way

With his bow and arrows.

“Why are you crying, my lovely one?”

“I’m crying because my moonstone

Lies at the bottom of the water.”

“If it is but that, my lovely,

I will help you.”

But the hunter died and was drowned.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), John Indian , Hester , Mama Yaya
Page Number: 55
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 9 Quotes

How could their yearning and nostalgia possibly be compared to mine? What they yearned for was the sweetness of a gentler life, the life of white women who were served and waited on by attentive slaves. Even if the reverend Mr. Parris had ended up losing all his wealth and hopes, the life they had spent there was composed of luxury and voluptuousness. And what did I yearn for? The subtle joys of being a slave. The cakes made out of crumbs from the stale bread of life. The fleeting moments of forbidden games.

We did not belong to the same universe, Goodwife Parris, Betsey, and I, and all the affection in the world could not change that.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Elizabeth Parris , Betsey Parris , Samuel Parris
Page Number: 63
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 10 Quotes

There were two or three black servants in the community, how they got there I have no idea, and all of us were not simply cursed, but visible messengers of Satan. So we were furtively approached to try and assuage unspeakable desires for revenge, to liberate unsuspecting hatred and bitterness, and to do evil by every means. He who passed for the most devoted of husbands dreamed of nothing but killing his wife! She who passed for the most faithful of wives was prepared to sell the soul of her children to get rid of the father!

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), John Indian (speaker)
Page Number: 65
Explanation and Analysis:

“I cannot do what your heart dares not disclose. The woman who revealed her science taught me to heal and console rather than to do evil. Once, when, like yourself, I dreamed of doing my worst, she warned: ‘Don't become like them, knowing only how to do evil.’”

[Sarah] shrugged her frail shoulders under her wretched shawl. “Knowledge must adapt itself to society. You are no longer in Barbados among our unfortunate brothers and sisters. You are among monsters who are set on destroying us.”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Sarah (speaker), Mama Yaya
Page Number: 68
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 11 Quotes

“I have been watching you, my poor suffering wife, during all these years we have been together and I can see that you don’t understand this white man’s world in which we live. You make exceptions. You believe that some of them can respect and love us. How mistaken you are! You must hate without distinction!”

“Well, you're a fine one to talk, John Indian! You're like a puppet in their hands. I'll pull this string and you pull that one…”

“I wear a mask, my tormented wife, painted the colors they want […] and behind all that, I, John Indian, am free.”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), John Indian (speaker)
Page Number: 74
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 1: Chapter 12 Quotes

You may be surprised that I shiver at the idea of death. But that's the ambiguity of people like us. Our body is mortal and we are therefore prey to every torment of the common mortal. Like them, we fear suffering. Like them, we are frightened of the terrible antechamber that ends our life on earth. However certain we are that the doors will open before us onto another form of life, this time eternal, we are nevertheless wracked with anguish.

In order to bring peace back into my heart and mind I had to repeat Mama Yaya’s words: “Out of them all, you'll be the only one to survive.”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Mama Yaya (speaker), John Indian
Page Number: 86
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Chapter 2 Quotes

“What does Satan look like? Don't forget he has more than one disguise up his sleeve. That's why after all this time nobody's caught him yet. Sometimes he's a black man...”

There I interrupted her in a worried voice. “If I say that, won't they think of John Indian?”

She shrugged her shoulders irritably. Hester got irritated easily. “Don't talk to me about your wretched husband! He's no better than mine. Shouldn't he be here to share your sorrow? Life is too kind to men, whatever their color.”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Hester (speaker), John Indian
Page Number: 100
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Chapter 4 Quotes

I was wracked by a violent feeling of pain and terror. It seemed that I was gradually being forgotten. I felt that I would only be mentioned in passing in the Salem witchcraft trials about which so much would be written later, trials that would arouse the curiosity and pity of generations to come as the greatest testimony of a superstitious and barbaric age. There would be mention here and there of “a slave originating from the West Indies and probably practicing ‘hoodoo.’” There would be no mention of my age or my personality. I would be ignored. As early as the end of the 17th century, petitions would be circulated, judgments made, rehabilitating the victims, restoring their honor, and returning their property to their descendants. I would never be included! Tituba would be condemned forever! There would never, ever, be a careful, sensitive biography recreating my life and its suffering.

And I was outraged by this future injustice that seemed more cruel than even death itself.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker)
Page Number: 110
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Chapter 7 Quotes

That night Hester lay down beside me, as she did sometimes. I laid my head on the quiet water-lily of her cheek and held her tight. Surprisingly, a feeling of pleasure slowly flooded over me. Can you feel pleasure from hugging a body similar to your own? For me, pleasure had always been in the shape of another body whose hollows fitted my curves and whose swellings nestled in the tender flatlands of my flesh. Was Hester showing me another kind of bodily pleasure?

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Hester
Page Number: 122
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Chapter 10 Quotes

Having someone recognize me after ten years of absence brought tears to my eyes. I had forgotten this ability our people have of remembering. Nothing escapes them! Everything is engraved in their memory!

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Deodatus
Page Number: 136
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Chapter 12 Quotes

Maroons? 10 years earlier, when I had left Barbados, maroons were few and far between. There was merely talk of a certain Ti-Noel and his family, who held Farley Hill. Nobody had ever seen him. He had been living in everyone’s imagination for so long that he must have been an old man by now. Yet he was said to be young and bold and his exploits had become household legends.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Ti-Noel , Deodatus
Page Number: 143
Explanation and Analysis:

At one moment the rain fell in soft whispers, drenching plants, trees, and roots, unlike the hostile, icy rains I recalled in the land I had left behind. Yes, nature changes her language according to the land, and curiously, her language harmonizes with that of man. Savage nature, savage men! Protecting, well-meaning nature, open hearted and generous men!

My first night on my island!

The croaking of the frogs and agua toads, the trill of the night birds, the cackling of the chickens frightened by the mongooses, and the braying of the donkeys tied to the calabash trees, the spirits’ resting place, kept up a continual music. I never wanted the morning to come.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker)
Related Symbols: Tropical Plants
Page Number: 147
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Chapter 13 Quotes

“Tituba, a slave originating from the West Indies and probably practicing ‘hoodoo.’ A few lines in the many volumes written on the Salem witch trials. Why was I going to be ignored? This question too had crossed my mind. Is it because nobody cares about a Negress and her trials and tribulations? Is that why?

I can look for my story among those of the witches of Salem, but it isn't there.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker)
Page Number: 149
Explanation and Analysis:

The reader may be surprised that at a time when the lash was constantly being used, I managed to enjoy this peace in freedom. Our islands have two sides to them. The side of the masters’ carriages and their constables on horseback, armed with muskets and savage, baying hounds. And the other, mysterious and secret side, composed of passwords, whispers, and a conspiracy of silence. It was on this side that I lived, protected by common collusion. Mama Yaya made a thick vegetation grow up around my cabin and it was as if I lived in a fortified castle. An inexperienced eye could only make out a tangle of guava trees, ferns, frangipani, and acoma trees, specked here and there by the mauve flower of a hibiscus.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Mama Yaya
Related Symbols: Tropical Plants
Page Number: 156
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Chapter 14 Quotes

When I got to the burning of Benjamin Cohen d’Azevedo’s house, he interrupted me with a frown: “But why? Wasn't he white like the others? […] Do they need to hate so much that they hate each other?”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Iphigene (speaker), Benjamin Cohen d’Azevedo
Page Number: 160
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Chapter 15 Quotes

I was not really worried about the outcome of the plot. In fact, I tried not to think about it. I let my mind blur and color dreams and I concentrated above all on my baby. She had started to move in my womb; a sort of slow, gentle creeping as if she wanted to explore her confined quarters. […] A little longer and we would be looking at each other and her fresh gaze would make me ashamed of my wrinkles and my stumps of teeth. My daughter would settle old scores for me! She would know how to win the love of a man with a heart as warm as cornbread. […] They would have children they would teach to see beauty in themselves. Children who would grow straight and free toward the sky.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker)
Page Number: 167
Explanation and Analysis:
Epilogue Quotes

Sometimes I become a fighting cock in the pit and the clamor of the crowd sends my head spinning […] Oh how I love to give this slave the excitement of winning! Off he goes, dancing and brandishing his fists, a gesture that will soon symbolize other victories. […] Sometimes I become a goat and caper around Samantha, who is no fool. For this child of mine has learned to recognize my presence in the twitching of an animal's coat, the crackling of a fire between four stones, the rainbow-hued babbling of the river, and the sound of the wind as it whistles through the great trees on the hills.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Samantha
Related Symbols: Tropical Plants
Page Number: 175
Explanation and Analysis:
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I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem PDF

Tituba Character Timeline in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The timeline below shows where the character Tituba appears in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1: Chapter 1
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Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Tituba tells the story of her birth. Her mother Abena was an Ashanti woman who was... (full context)
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...Yao and Abena find courage in each other, and Yao agrees to raise Abena’s baby (Tituba) as his own. Initially, the pair feels a familial bond, but over time they become... (full context)
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...men. Instead of naming the child a standard Ashanti name, Yao invents the name of “Tituba”; Tituba feels that her names signals that she is “the daughter of [Yao’s] will and... (full context)
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Tituba also comes to terms with her mother’s lack of affection—because Tituba reminds Abena of the... (full context)
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One day, while Tituba is walking with her mother, Darnell stops Abena in her tracks and tries to rape... (full context)
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A deeply traumatized Tituba, only seven years old, is driven off the plantation. She goes to live with a... (full context)
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Mama Yaya teaches Tituba to use herbs and tropical plants to heal and change others’ behavior; she also teaches... (full context)
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...regularly commune with them.” From that point on, Yao and Abena become regular fixtures in Tituba’s life. Mama Yaya also shows Tituba how to change form and how to make sacrifices.... (full context)
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...plantation, which results in all of the various enslaved families being separated. In Darnell’s absence, Tituba builds herself a “cabin on stilts” at the edge of a river. She gardens, raises... (full context)
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After a few years, Tituba encounters a group of enslaved men and is surprised to learn that she is viewed... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 2
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Tituba meets and flirts with John Indian, a handsome man born to an indigenous father and... (full context)
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Tituba wants to make John love her, but Yaya cautions that “men do not love. They... (full context)
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On Sunday, Tituba goes to the dance, and she learns that it is Carnival: the only time of... (full context)
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John and Tituba become a couple, but he refuses to live with her in her house in the... (full context)
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A week later, after feeling shame, panic, and remorse, Tituba sets her animals free and packs up her mother’s dresses. As she thinks gratefully of... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 3
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 Susanna is a bitter, cruel, and deeply racist woman. As soon as she meets Tituba, she gives her a list of tasks and orders her to convert to Christianity. John... (full context)
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...John Indian. Now, he lives in an “attractive” little colonial house on the Endicott plantation. Tituba is baffled by her new lover’s friendliness towards Susanna, but John explains that “the duty... (full context)
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For two days, John and Tituba have passionate, satisfying sex; John also cooks delicious meals with tropical plants for Tituba. As... (full context)
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The white women cruelly talk about Tituba as if she did not exist—making Tituba feel that “they were striking me off the... (full context)
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Both John and Susanna try to force Tituba to believe in Christianity and the Holy Trinity, but Tituba cannot find meaning in the... (full context)
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Tituba tells John Indian about this exchange, and he panics, explaining that white people define witchcraft... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 4
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 Though Tituba wants to kill Susanna, both Abena and Mama Yaya counsel her against doing so. “Even... (full context)
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John and Tituba make up, and a few days later, Susanna gets very sick. A witchcraft expert is... (full context)
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At one point, some of the partygoers conduct a marriage ceremony between John and Tituba. One woman objects, claiming that John has fathered two children with her. But the crowd... (full context)
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Two days later, Susanna tells John and Tituba that she believes Tituba is a witch—and that she feels Tituba is responsible for this... (full context)
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Susanna announces that she is dying, and that she is planning to sell John and Tituba to a new master. Both are horrified by this thought: John because he had thought... (full context)
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Still, Susanna is firm that John and Tituba will belong to this new slaveholder, Samuel Parris—and worse still, that they will follow him... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 5
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On board a ship, Parris pours ice-cold water on Tituba and John and formally marries them. Tituba feels that she is going to be ill.... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 6
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While she travels to America, Tituba gets to know Parris’s sickly wife Elizabeth; they bond because Elizabeth seems to hate Parris... (full context)
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Tituba meets Abigail, Parris’s teenaged niece, and Betsey, his young daughter; she reflects that these girls... (full context)
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At night, Parris interrupts Tituba and John when they are about to have sex to force them to pray (alongside... (full context)
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Though Tituba feels an instant distrust for Abigail, she forms strong friendships with Elizabeth and Betsey. Tituba... (full context)
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At last, they all arrive in Boston. Tituba is surprised both by how busy the city is and by how rainy and grey... (full context)
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That night, Parris wakes Tituba up, informing her that he believes Elizabeth is about to die. Tituba decides to use... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 7
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Tituba and John spend the year in Boston while Parris tries to find a parish that... (full context)
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...do Abigail and Betsey get to be their full selves, playing games and dancing. Sometimes, Tituba takes them to the ocean, which makes her think of Barbados. (full context)
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One day, while walking along the wharf, Tituba sees an old woman being hanged. The sight throws her back into a panic, as... (full context)
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Tituba realizes she is pregnant, but she decides to abort the baby—slavery is too cruel for... (full context)
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While Tituba is getting to know her environment, she meets an old woman named Judah White; Judah... (full context)
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Without telling John her plan, Tituba successfully aborts her baby, though she feels very conflicted about this decision. Summer approaches, and... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 8
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Tituba creates a “lament” for her aborted child; in this poem, she sings about losing a... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 9
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...Salem is extremely rural; there are less than 2,000 people, and cows wander the streets. Tituba, John, and the Parris family arrive at their new home, and Abigail runs into the... (full context)
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...him, and she is also curious about what makes Elizabeth so ill. Goodwife Sibley tells Tituba that two women (the wives of the previous ministers) have died in this house, and... (full context)
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...some snooping around) Parris. While Parris hems and haws over the specifics of his salary, Tituba and John celebrate having the attic all to themselves. (full context)
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Quickly, Tituba becomes a point of interest for many of the teenage girls in the town (especially... (full context)
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Eventually, more and more girls gather in Tituba’s kitchen to ask about people in league with the devil. As a joke, Tituba mentions... (full context)
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When Betsey begins to feel disturbed by these stories, Tituba assures her that “Tituba can do anything. Tituba knows everything. Tituba sees everything.” But Betsey... (full context)
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To ease her homesickness, Tituba fills a bowl with water and imagines the bowl is Barbados. The sympathy she feels... (full context)
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As Betsey gets increasingly anxious, Tituba decides to give her a magic bath, plunging her into water meant to replicate amniotic... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 10
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Tituba learns more about Parris’s religion, in which every strange occurrence or mishap is blamed on... (full context)
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Tituba’s knowledge of the villagers’ worst impulses unsettles her. Worse still, Parris hires John out to... (full context)
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One night, Tituba encounters Sarah, another enslaved Black woman. Sarah is routinely beaten by the woman she works... (full context)
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Sarah pushes back, insisting that “knowledge must adapt itself to society”—and so, now that Tituba is in a majority-white society instead of a largely Black one, she must change her... (full context)
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...older woman. At first, Goodwife Nurse seems to want simply to chat—but then, she asks Tituba to punish her neighbors with magic. Tituba is furious that everyone views her in this... (full context)
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...Betsey, and their friends become increasingly obsessed with magic, Betsey turns rigid and falls ill. Tituba is horrified to see that, even after all the care she has showered on young... (full context)
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The next morning, when Tituba approaches to serve the Parris family breakfast, Betsey begins screaming inhuman screams. Abigail takes in... (full context)
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...on in the Parris house. As Parris tries to reassure them that nothing is wrong, Tituba resolves to give up on Mama Yaya’s “humanitarian” outlook; instead, she will accept that “those... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 11
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John tells Tituba that she does not know how to survive in the white man’s world. Tituba wears... (full context)
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Parris tells Tituba that he has brought in a witchcraft specialist named Dr. Griggs to assess the situation—and... (full context)
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Tituba goes to Betsey’s room with the naïve hope that she will be able to connect... (full context)
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Tituba is deeply wounded by these words, especially coming from someone she is so attached to.... (full context)
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That evening, all of the teenage girls come into Tituba’s home; she notices that their fervor has made them almost attractive, even though many of... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 12
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Though Dr. Griggs and Tituba had often worked together to help various residents of Salem, now he, too, has turned... (full context)
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Parris again threatens Tituba with hanging, and she tells him to accuse Mary Sibley, not her; she then reflects... (full context)
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Tituba runs to the Putnam household, recalling that Goodwife Putnam often has visions of demons. Currently,... (full context)
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One by one, the women of the town begin to accuse Tituba of witchcraft; only the mild-mannered Elizabeth Proctor stands up for her. When Tituba responds to... (full context)
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Tituba reflects on the hypocrisy of Salem, “a community that stole, cheated, and burgled while wrapping... (full context)
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As Tituba heads home, she is stopped by Sarah Hutchinson, whose sheep she had stolen. Goodwife Hutchinson... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 1
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Three ministers, each from a different corner of Massachusetts, gather to try Tituba. Tituba defends her innocence, but her anxiety makes her voice sound shaky. Parris presents the... (full context)
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Like “birds of prey,” Parris and the other ministers tie Tituba down and command that she confess to witchcraft and name her accomplices. When she insists... (full context)
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As Tituba is dragged to the jail in Ipswich through the cold February air, she decides that... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 2
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In the week that she is in prison, Tituba makes friends with her new cellmate, a beautiful, young, pregnant white woman named Hester. Hester... (full context)
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...strove to abort all of their children with a variety of potions and home remedies. Tituba shares that she has done a similar thing. Bonded by their shared experiences, Hester confesses... (full context)
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Tituba begins to tell the story of her life to Hester’s pregnant belly, and the two... (full context)
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Hester helps Tituba prepare her testimony for the court; “trust a minister’s daughter,” Tituba scoffs, “to know a... (full context)
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Tituba begins to worry that if she describes Satan as a “black man” (a common descriptor... (full context)
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...in which women can write books and give their children their own last names. Though Tituba is on board with the ideas, Hester teases her that she loves love too much... (full context)
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But while Tituba appreciates this new friendship, she is still paralyzed by fear of her trial and hopelessness... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 3
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A footnote explains that the following chapter is taken from the actual archival records of Tituba’s testimony. In her testimony, Tituba explains that she never hurt any children, even though the... (full context)
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Tituba then admits to hurting some of the children, but she swears she will do so... (full context)
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The archival record ends, and Tituba resumes her own narration. When she is pressed to give more names, she fakes sudden... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 4
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After her deposition, Tituba is jailed in a villager’s barn, so she does not see the wave of accusations... (full context)
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From Elizabeth, Tituba learns that even Rebecca Nurse—one of the most respected villagers in the entire parish—has been... (full context)
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One day, John visits Tituba in her makeshift jail. Tituba is horrified to see that he has changed, becoming cunning... (full context)
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John Indian stops visiting, and Tituba is taken back to the jail in Ipswich. On the journey, Tituba fears that she... (full context)
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Back at the jail, Tituba requests to be placed with Hester, but she learns that Hester has hanged herself. In... (full context)
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At the almshouse, Tituba is studied by a male doctor, who offers her various potions made of blood and... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 5
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Tituba thinks with sadness about the children she and Hester each aborted; she sings her old... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 6
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...across Massachusetts, and so many people are accused that the jails run out of space. Tituba is forced out of her cell to make room for prisoners of higher status; all... (full context)
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Tituba thinks of Mama Yaya and her own survival, but this thought no longer cheers her;... (full context)
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...continue, and prominent farmer Giles Corey is stoned to death. Though Corey had testified against Tituba, she is still upset to hear of his death—especially because, rather than admit to witchcraft,... (full context)
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...Though this novel court system helps to calm the situation (or at least that’s what Tituba can understand from her cell), she is still too disillusioned to care much about this... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 7
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...were poor—and yet, the colonial government still refuses to pay for their prison costs. Instead, Tituba is forced to work off the cost of her own imprisonment in the jail’s kitchens.... (full context)
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...all of the accused witches left alive are set free. But prison superintendent Noyes informs Tituba that in order to pay off her prison debts, she will have to sell herself... (full context)
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After being inspected by a series of slaveholders—who comment on her body, age, and skin-tone—Tituba encounters a small, hunched older man who walks with a limp. There is something generous... (full context)
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That night, amidst dreams of Barbados, Tituba connects with Hester’s spirit and feels the stirrings of sexual longing. Tituba wonders if it... (full context)
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The Jewish merchant purchases Tituba, and Noyes smashes her chains. After months of imprisonment, Tituba no longer knows how to... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 8
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Tituba learns that the Jewish merchant is named Benjamin Cohen d’Azevedo; his wife and youngest children... (full context)
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Over time, Benjamin begins to treat Tituba with great kindness, giving her clothes or little treats that had belonged to his deceased,... (full context)
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...of these late-night meetings, Benjamin asks if his oldest daughter Metahebel can join. Metahebel is Tituba’s favorite of the children, though Metahebel believes that those who are persecuted should not fight... (full context)
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Benjamin and Tituba eventually end up sleeping together; “why,” Tituba wonders, “must any relationship with the slightest hint... (full context)
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Benjamin educates Tituba about the history of the Jews, and he introduces her to the contemporary struggles and... (full context)
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One day, Tituba runs into Mary Black, one of the few other enslaved women from Salem (who had... (full context)
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When Tituba asks about John Indian, Mary tells her that he has moved to a nearby town... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 9
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Tituba recovers from the news of John Indian, and she has four happy months with Benjamin... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 10
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Eventually, the villagers turn against Benjamin and Tituba, ripping the family’s mezuzahs off the door and throwing stones at anyone who leaves the... (full context)
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...God is punishing him, not for having had sex outside of marriage but for refusing Tituba her freedom. He buys Tituba a ticket on a boat back to Barbados, and asks... (full context)
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Though Tituba has been formally emancipated, once on board the ship, she still faces racism and suspicion—especially... (full context)
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While Tituba wonders what awaits her in Barbados, she bonds with an enslaved Black sailor named Deodatus.... (full context)
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Deodatus pushes Tituba to think about what she will do as a free woman while most of her... (full context)
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Many sailors, including Deodatus, develop a fever, and Tituba is able to heal almost all of them. But rather than thanking Tituba, the captain... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 11
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Tituba reflects on how happy she was for her few months with Benjamin: “we used to... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 12
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When Tituba arrives in Bridgetown, Barbados, she is gratified to be greeted by the spirits of Mama... (full context)
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After longing to go home for so many years, Tituba realizes that she no longer knows anyone on the island, and she is about to... (full context)
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When Tituba asks what plantation Deodatus works on, he explains that he does not work on any... (full context)
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Tituba is blindfolded and taken to the maroon camp, but she has mixed feelings about entering... (full context)
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Christopher, the leader of the maroons, asks Tituba if she does have powers, and she explains that she does, but that she only... (full context)
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Tituba explains to Christopher that “death is a door that nobody can lock,” and she fights... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 13
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Tituba is determined to increase her powers, so she begins asking local obeah men and women... (full context)
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Before Tituba returns to the maroon camp, the obeah man reminds her that there are certain natural... (full context)
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Once again, Tituba cannot believe the evil that permeates so much of human society. She heads home, where... (full context)
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Despite the threat of the planters, Tituba spends the next few months happily. First, she helps save a dying baby, which makes... (full context)
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Christopher begins to confide in Tituba, revealing that the maroons do not have enough weapons to successfully fight back against the... (full context)
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As Tituba gets to know the female maroons more, they begin to question her about the scope... (full context)
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At long last, Tituba returns to her old cabin, which is more or less as she has left it.... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 14
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Tituba, to her surprise, realizes that she is pregnant. Although she is not happy about the... (full context)
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...enslaved man named Iphigene who has been beaten by a white overseer is brought to Tituba’s door; he is on the verge of death, and she is the only one who... (full context)
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Iphigene begins to plan this revolt. Though she supports the idea, Tituba takes a backseat to the actual planning, wanting instead to focus on her pregnancy. But... (full context)
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Iphigene also asks Tituba to go to Christopher to prevent the maroons from interfering; he explains that the maroons... (full context)
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That night, Tituba dreams that Christopher, John Indian, and Samuel Parris come into her room like “three birds... (full context)
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Nevertheless, Tituba gets in touch with Yao, Abena, and Mama Yaya to ask if the slave revolt... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 15
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Tituba does not want to go on with her story, as she feels that it is... (full context)
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That afternoon, Iphigene brings Tituba a rabbit to sacrifice. When she goes to kill the animal, however, she is horrified... (full context)
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The spirits of Mama Yaya, Yao, and Abena return to comfort Tituba (and to chastise her, once again, for always focusing on men). Around 8 o’clock, Iphigene... (full context)
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After she and Iphigene have sex, Tituba begins to feel guilty, as the young boy could be her son. She also wonders... (full context)
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Tituba has another nightmare, in which the forest has turned against her. She realizes that the... (full context)
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...of makeshift gallows. Iphigene is the first to be hanged, but before he is killed, Tituba promises him they will be together in the afterlife. (full context)
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As the slaveholders prepare to hang Tituba, they read out a list of her alleged crimes, focusing on the accusations of witchcraft.... (full context)
Epilogue
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Tituba has finished her “bitter” story, but she wants readers to know that Christopher was incorrect—“there... (full context)
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Tituba explains that she has no need for the written word: “my people will keep my... (full context)
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Tituba’s only regret is that she can no longer commune with Hester, as each woman remains... (full context)
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Tituba reflects that she now knows “why there is so much suffering and why the eyes... (full context)
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Sometimes, Tituba cannot save the people around her; just a week earlier, a young bossale girl had... (full context)
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Finally, Tituba confesses that sometimes she changes into mortal form. In these moments, she will become a... (full context)