I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

by

Maryse Condé

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Maroon Term Analysis

Maroons were enslaved people who escaped plantation life to go live in the mountains or forests; often, they would cohabitate with indigenous people in small settlements towards the center of Caribbean islands (while plantation owners tended to live near the sea). In the book, Ti-Noel is the legendary founder of the maroon settlement in Barbados; by the time Tituba arrives, the group is being led by a man named Christopher. Marronage could be an essential form of resistance to slavery, but as Tituba points out, some maroons would also cooperate with slaveholders to capture runaway slaves, preserving their own freedom at the expense of others.

Maroon Quotes in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem quotes below are all either spoken by Maroon or refer to Maroon. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
).
Part 2: Chapter 12 Quotes

Maroons? 10 years earlier, when I had left Barbados, maroons were few and far between. There was merely talk of a certain Ti-Noel and his family, who held Farley Hill. Nobody had ever seen him. He had been living in everyone’s imagination for so long that he must have been an old man by now. Yet he was said to be young and bold and his exploits had become household legends.

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Ti-Noel , Deodatus
Page Number: 143
Explanation and Analysis:
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Maroon Term Timeline in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The timeline below shows where the term Maroon appears in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 2: Chapter 12
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...explains that he does not work on any plantation. Instead, he and his friends are maroons, meaning they are formerly enslaved people who have escaped to the hills. He was inspired... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 13
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Before Tituba returns to the maroon camp, the obeah man reminds her that there are certain natural secrets she can never... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Christopher begins to confide in Tituba, revealing that the maroons do not have enough weapons to successfully fight back against the white plantation owners. One... (full context)
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
As Tituba gets to know the female maroons more, they begin to question her about the scope of her powers. Tituba points out... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 14
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Iphigene also asks Tituba to go to Christopher to prevent the maroons from interfering; he explains that the maroons actually benefit from a “tacit agreement” with the... (full context)