I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

by

Maryse Condé

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The word Nago stems from the word Anago, a Yoruba-speaking tribe that flourished in western Africa (near what is now Nigeria). Mama Yaya is Nago, and John Indian is born to an indigenous father and a Nago mother.
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Nago Term Timeline in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The timeline below shows where the term Nago appears in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1: Chapter 1
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...years old, is driven off the plantation. She goes to live with a formerly enslaved Nago woman named Mama Yaya. Mama Yaya watched her husband and children be tortured to death,... (full context)
Part 1: Chapter 2
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...and flirts with John Indian, a handsome man born to an indigenous father and a Nago mother. John explains that he is enslaved by Susanna Endicott, an old widow. He invites... (full context)