I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

by

Maryse Condé

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Obeah is a kind of spiritual healing, rooted in deep knowledge of tropical plants and herbal medicines (or potions). Originating with the Ashanti people, obeah was particularly popular in the New World as both a form of care and as a means of resistance against white enslavers. Though Tituba does not identify as an obeah woman, such women and men were tremendously respected in Caribbean communities—indeed, it was believed they could make themselves and others immortal.
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Obeah Term Timeline in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The timeline below shows where the term Obeah appears in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 2: Chapter 13
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Tituba is determined to increase her powers, so she begins asking local obeah men and women for their secrets. When one of the men learns that Tituba was... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Before Tituba returns to the maroon camp, the obeah man reminds her that there are certain natural secrets she can never learn while still... (full context)