Indian Horse

Saul Indian Horse Character Analysis

Saul Indian Horse is the protagonist and narrator of the novel. In many ways, his life is modeled on that of Richard Wagamese, the author. Saul is a member of the Fish Clan, an Indigenous Canadian tribe that lives near the Winnipeg River. At a young age, Saul’s family is torn apart by white Canadians who steal away his brother, Benjamin, and his sister, Rachel, and force them into a Canadian school system for Indigenous children. Later, Saul himself is kidnapped and sent to such a school. There, Saul endures brutal physical abuse, sexual abuse (a fact which he represses for many years), and a prolonged attempt to break his spirit. At school, however, he becomes a talented hockey player, and is adopted by an Indigenous Canadian man who sees potential in Saul. For a time it appears that hockey will provide Saul with a path to a better, happier life. But as Saul grows older, the trauma from his past and the racism he faces everyday bear down on him. He becomes violent, sullen, and an alcoholic. It’s not until many years later, when he is a grown man, that he begins to acknowledge the roots of his unhappiness. As the book comes to its cautiously optimistic ending, Saul is busy trying to address and repair the pain that lingers from his childhood.

Saul Indian Horse Quotes in Indian Horse

The Indian Horse quotes below are all either spoken by Saul Indian Horse or refer to Saul Indian Horse. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Family and Tradition Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Douglas & McIntyre edition of Indian Horse published in 2012.
Chapter 1 Quotes

Our people have rituals and ceremonies meant to bring us vision. I have never participated in any of them, but I have seen things. I have been lifted up and out of this physical world into a place where time and space have a different rhythm. I always remained within the borders of this world, yet I had the eyes of one born to a different plane. Our medicine people would call me a seer. But I was in the thrall of a power I never understood. It left me years ago, and the loss of that gift has been my greatest sorrow.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker)
Page Number: 3
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Chapter 3 Quotes

So we hid from the white men. Benjamin and I developed the quick ears of bush people. When we detected the drone of an engine we knew to run. We'd grab the old lady's hand and scuttle into the trees and find a place to secret ourselves away until we knew for certain that there was no danger.

Page Number: 10
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Chapter 5 Quotes

I wondered what would become of us there. I wondered if the spirit, the monitous, of Gods Lake would look upon us with pity and compassion, if we would flourish on this land that was ours alone.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker)
Page Number: 20
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Chapter 6 Quotes

I crept to the edge of the ridge and looked over. The face of the cliff had collapsed, and the camp was gone. Vanished. Even the trees had been scraped away and the beach was strewn with boulders. The chalky smell of rock dust brought tears to my eyes and I stood there weeping, my shoulders shaking at the thought of those people buried under all that stone.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker)
Page Number: 24
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 12 Quotes

We'd never seen anyone so composed, so assured, so peaceful. Something in her bearing reminded us about where we'd come from. We surrounded her like acolytes and that enraged the nuns. They thought Sheila was thumbing her nose at them and they set out to break her.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Sheila Jack
Page Number: 50
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 16 Quotes

I would not feel lonely or afraid, deserted or abandoned, but connected to something far bigger than myself. Then I'd climb back into bed and sleep until the dawn woke me and I could walk back out to the rink again.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 62
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 21 Quotes

Sometimes three or four boys would be visited like that. Sometimes only one. Other times boys would be led from the dorms. Where they went and what happened to them was never spoken of. In the daylight we would look at each other blankly, so that we would not cause any further shame. It was the same for the girls.
"God's love," Angelique Lynx Leg whispered one day.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Angelique Lynx Leg (speaker)
Page Number: 81-82
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 22 Quotes

"Hockey is like the universe, Saul," he said one day. "When you stand in the dark and look up at it, you see the placid fire of stars. But if we were right in the heart of it, we'd see chaos. Comets churning by. Meteorites. Star explosions. Things being born, things dying. Chaos, Saul. But that chaos is organized. It's harnessed. It's controlled.

Related Characters: Father Gaston Leboutilier (speaker), Saul Indian Horse
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 84
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 23 Quotes

"Do they hate me?"
"They don't hate you, Saul." 'Well, what, then?"
"They think it's their game."

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Father Gaston Leboutilier (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 91-92
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 24 Quotes

I looked around at all those adult faces, lingering on Father Leboutilier's. I'd never been offered choice before.
'All right," I said. "I'll go."

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Father Gaston Leboutilier
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 97
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 25 Quotes

No one said a word. They didn't have to. I stripped off my jersey and sat there breathing in the atmosphere of that small wooden shack. I was a Moose.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 107
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 30 Quotes

When we walked into the lobby the first thing we saw were glass cabinets along the walls filled with trophies and photographs. It was like a shrine to their home team. We stood there with our gear bags in our hands, studying the display. There were no awards in our bush league. The winners were celebrated with feasts and parties but there was no money for trophies.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 122
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 31 Quotes

There were moments when you'd catch another boy's eye and know that you were both thinking about it. Everything was contained in that glance.
All the hurt. All the shame. All the rage. The white people thought it was their game. They thought it was their world.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker)
Page Number: 136
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 38 Quotes

The press would not let me be. When I hit someone, it wasn't just a bodycheck; I was counting coup.
When I made a dash down the ice and brought the crowd to their feet, I was on a raid. If I inadvertently high-sticked someone during a tussle in the corner, I was taking scalps. When I did not react to getting a penalty, I was the stoic Indian.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 163
Explanation and Analysis:
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When I hit the ice I was effective. I scored twenty-three points in nine games. But the taunting from the stands continued, and I fumed and smoldered and racked up one hundred and twenty minutes in the penalty box. I caused the Marlies to play short-handed a lot of the time, and we lost seven of those games. Finally, they benched me completely. After one night of sitting in the stands, I packed my bag and got on a bus back to Manitouwadge.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 167
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 41 Quotes

I punched him in the head with everything I had, and he crumpled onto the floorboards. I turned to face the rest of them. I was frigid blackness inside, like water under a berg. I wanted another one to stand, wanted another one to swing at me, invite me to erupt. But they stayed seated, and nobody spoke as I walked slowly over to the table and picked up Jorgenson's discarded hand of cards. I studied the cards, then smirked and tossed the hand back on the table.
"Game over," I said. They never bothered me again.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Jorgenson
Page Number: 175
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 44 Quotes

I was an alchemist, mixing solutions I packed in my lunch kit to assuage the strychnine feel of rot in my guts. It was a dim world. Things glimmered, never shone.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker)
Page Number: 181
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 49 Quotes

He'd told me I could play when I was big enough. I loved the idea so much that I kept quiet. I loved the idea of being loved so much that I did what he asked. When I found myself liking it, I felt dirty, repulsive, sick. The secret morning practices that moved me closer to the game also moved me further away from the horror. I used the game to shelter me from seeing the truth, from having to face it every day. Later, after I was gone, the game kept me from remembering. As long as I could escape into it, I could fly away. Fly away and never have to land on the scorched earth of my boyhood.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Father Gaston Leboutilier
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 199
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 51 Quotes

"The journey you make is good." "What am I to learn here?"
He swept his arm to take in the lake, the shore and the cliff behind us. "You've come to learn to carry this place within you. This place of beginnings and endings."

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Slanting Sky (speaker)
Page Number: 205
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 52 Quotes

"Did they rape everyone?" I asked.
There was a long silence. In the distance I could hear the sounds of the mill and a train. I waited and they both looked at the floor.
"It doesn't have to be sexual to be rape, Saul," Martha said.
"When they invade your spirit, it's rape too," Fred said.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Fred Kelly (speaker), Martha Kelly (speaker)
Page Number: 210
Explanation and Analysis:
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"They scooped out our insides, Saul. We're not responsible for that. We're not responsible for what happened to us. None of us are." Fred said. "But our healing-that's up to us. That's what saved me. Knowing it was my game."
"Could be a long game," I said.
"So what if it is?" he said. "Just keep your stick on the ice and your feet moving. Time will take care of itself."

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Fred Kelly (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 210
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 55 Quotes

"Did you want to hunt that fucker down? Make him feel some of the same pain?" Virgil asked. He still couldn't turn away from looking at the ice.
'At first, yeah. Then, the more we got into it at the centre the more I realized it was more than just him. I'd be hunting a long time if I lashed out at everyone. In the end, I learned the only one I could take care of was me."

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Virgil (speaker), Father Gaston Leboutilier
Page Number: 217
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 56 Quotes

"Even up here in the sticks, we like to use a hockey puck to play hockey," Virgil said and pushed out onto the ice.
"Old habits," I said when he reached me. "New days," he said.
"The guys here?"
"Them and more," he said.

Related Characters: Saul Indian Horse (speaker), Virgil (speaker)
Related Symbols: Hockey
Page Number: 220
Explanation and Analysis:
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Saul Indian Horse Character Timeline in Indian Horse

The timeline below shows where the character Saul Indian Horse appears in Indian Horse. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
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The narrator introduces himself as Saul Indian Horse. He’s a descendant of the Fish Clan, a tribe of Indigenous people from... (full context)
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Saul admits that he’s a “hardcore drunk.” He lives in the New Dawn Center, a treatment... (full context)
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Saul refuses to tell his life story when he’s sitting in a circle with his fellow... (full context)
Chapter 2
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Saul’s tribe has a story about how the first Indian horse arrived. The Fish Clan knew... (full context)
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...speech. But they decided to take care of the horse, anyway. Eventually, “Indian Horse” became Saul’s family name. (full context)
Chapter 3
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In 1961, Saul is just a boy. His grandmother, Naomi, is the matriarch of Saul’s community. Even as... (full context)
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Saul has a brother named Benjamin and a sister named Rachel. Saul never met Rachel, since... (full context)
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In 1957, when Saul was four years old, the Zhaunagush kidnapped his brother, Benjamin. Had the white men not... (full context)
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At night, Saul is scared. But Naomi comforts him by telling him stories about the old days—the days... (full context)
Chapter 4
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After Benjamin is taken away, Saul and his family leave and move further away from the river where the Fish Clan... (full context)
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Both of Saul’s parents begin drinking more spirits. To support themselves, they take on dangerous, miserable work cutting... (full context)
Chapter 5
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One day, while Saul and his family are living in Redditt, Benjamin reunites with them. He’s run away from... (full context)
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...move again because the white men will come looking for Benjamin soon. She adds that Saul and Benjamin should begin dancing the manoomin, the Fish Clan’s traditional dance. With this in... (full context)
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...way to Gods Lake. There, the hunters heard frightening laughter, and retreated. But years later, Saul’s grandfather journeyed to Gods Lake. He had a vision in which he and his family... (full context)
Chapter 6
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Saul and his family arrive at Gods Lake in the late summer. Gods Lake is a... (full context)
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One afternoon, Saul is walking by himself along Gods Lake when he hears the sound of his own... (full context)
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Suddenly, Saul feels a great hunger. In the distance, he can hear drums and the sound of... (full context)
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Suddenly, it is morning. Saul hears the sound of falling rocks. To his horror, he sees that the community of... (full context)
Chapter 7
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Naomi never explains Saul’s vision to him explicitly, but it’s perfectly clear what it means: Saul has had a... (full context)
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Benjamin and Saul learn how to make braids using tree bark. Braids are important in Saul’s tribe, because... (full context)
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Naomi and Saul’s mother sometimes argue about how to worship Creator. In school, Mary learned to be “God-fearing,”... (full context)
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...down the big “heads” of rice, and beating them with a stick. Then, Benjamin and Saul will crush the rice into small bits by walking over it “with careful, steady steps.” (full context)
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At the rice beds, Saul sees men and women collecting rice, and even filling entire canoes with rice. As he... (full context)
Chapter 8
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John tells Naomi that they’ll be taking Benjamin to a priest. Naomi refuses to accompany Saul’s parents. She agrees to wait with Saul. Saul watches as his parents leave, carrying their... (full context)
Chapter 9
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Saul’s parents never come back from their journey to find a priest. Weeks go by, and... (full context)
Chapter 10
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Naomi and Saul canoe away from Gods Lake. It’s becoming very cold, but Naomi makes warm shawls for... (full context)
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While Saul and Naomi paddle down the river, Naomi sings songs. Saul can’t tell what the songs... (full context)
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After four days of travel, Saul and Naomi hit some rough water, and they’re forced to swim away from the boat.... (full context)
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Saul and Naomi continue through the wilderness. Naomi claims that they’re close to Saul’s great-grandfather’s trail,... (full context)
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Saul and Naomi rest for a moment by the railway platform in the freezing cold. As... (full context)
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Had the canoe not capsized, Saul sometimes thinks, he and Naomi would have reached Minoose. But instead, Naomi froze to death,... (full context)
Chapter 11
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Saul is taken to live at St. Jerome’s Indian Residential School—a place that takes “all the... (full context)
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When Saul arrives at the school, some gruff old priests take him to be washed and cleaned... (full context)
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Father Quinney and Sister Ignacia continue to instruct Saul and the other children how to behave at the school. Ignacia claims that “obedience is... (full context)
Chapter 12
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At school, Saul quickly acquires a reputation for being Zhaunagush because he already knows how to speak and... (full context)
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...language by having his mouth washed out with lye—he chokes on the lye and dies. Saul doesn’t receive as many beatings as his peers receive, since he’s good at English. (full context)
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Saul is miserable at school. Instead of talking to his peers, he stays by himself at... (full context)
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One of Saul’s classmates is a boy named Arden Little Light, who always has a runny nose and... (full context)
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Sheila Jack is another one of Saul’s classmates. Sheila was trained by her family to become a great shaman, and she’s a... (full context)
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Shane Big Canoe, another one of Saul’s classmates, is desperate to run away from school. To prevent him from doing so, the... (full context)
Chapter 13
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One day, Saul and his classmates sneak away from school and make it to the bottom of the... (full context)
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That night, Saul and his classmates sneak back to the school with the smell of fish still on... (full context)
Chapter 14
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Saul’s classmates die of many diseases during their time in school. He witnesses children commit suicide... (full context)
Chapter 15
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The same year Saul arrives at St. Jerome’s, a priest named Father Gaston Leboutilier begins teaching there. He’s unusually... (full context)
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Father Leboutilier urges Saul to join the hockey team, insisting that hockey is “the greatest game” there is. Saul... (full context)
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To his own amazement, Saul finds that he understands hockey almost immediately. He’s good at seeing the ebb and flow... (full context)
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Saul begs Father Leboutilier to teach him how to play hockey. Father Leboutilier sadly explains that... (full context)
Chapter 16
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Saul has a new chore: cleaning the hockey rink before practice. He has to wake up... (full context)
Chapter 17
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By his second winter at St. Jerome’s, Saul has found an important ally in Father Leboutilier. Leboutilier defends Saul from teachers when they’re... (full context)
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Saul “senses” how to skate long before he knows how to do it. He intuitively understands... (full context)
Chapter 18
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...River. During one practice, a boy injures himself, meaning that he’ll be unable to play. Saul volunteers to replace the boy, explaining that he’s been practicing every morning. Even though Saul... (full context)
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The scrimmage begins. While Saul is confused at first, he quickly comes to understand the patterns of the game. Skating... (full context)
Chapter 19
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...Father Quinney and Sister Ignacia protest, Father Leboutilier is able to convince them to allow Saul to join the hockey team. He insists that Saul has a “God-given gift.” (full context)
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Years have gone by since Saul has heard from his parents. But he no longer feels so lonely. The game of... (full context)
Chapter 20
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A couple weeks after Saul is officially allowed onto the hockey team, the boys face their first opponent: the “town... (full context)
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The game begins, and Saul gains control of the puck. He skates past members of the opposing team, going exceptionally... (full context)
Chapter 21
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St. Jerome’s, Saul remembers, “was hell on earth.” Even though St. Jerome’s is supposed to be a school,... (full context)
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Year after year, Saul endures beatings, threats, and other forms of cruelty from the faculty at St. Jerome’s. Most... (full context)
Chapter 22
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When Saul plays hockey, he leaves his misery and frustration behind. Father Leboutilier continues to take an... (full context)
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For the rest of the hockey season, Saul and his team do well in competitions against opposing teams. Even after the season is... (full context)
Chapter 23
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Saul is now almost thirteen years old, and ready to begin the new hockey season. Shortly... (full context)
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Saul begins practicing with the town team, the White River Falcons, coached by a man named... (full context)
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...with Father Leboutilier, and delivers some bad news which Leboutilier has to pass on to Saul: other teams have been refusing to play against the White River Falcons because Saul, their... (full context)
Chapter 24
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For the rest of hockey season, Saul competes in scrimmages with his teammates. Father Leboutilier continues to work one-on-one with Saul, inspiring... (full context)
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One day, a man named Fred Kelly comes to watch Saul and the other players practice. Father Leboutilier explains that Kelly coaches a big tournament team,... (full context)
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Father Leboutilier explains that Fred Kelly has come to make Saul an incredible offer. Saul will live with Kelly and his wife, Martha, who’ll become his... (full context)
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...hockey is a “soulless game,” even after Father Leboutilier points out that it will give Saul “a chance at a better life.” Despite Ignacia’s resistance, Father Quinney agrees to let Saul... (full context)
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Having spoken amongst themselves, the priests of St. Jerome’s ask Saul if he wants to move in with the Kelly family. Saul hesitates, and then says,... (full context)
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Saul prepares to leave St. Jerome’s. He gathers his few belongings and then walks outside to... (full context)
Chapter 25
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Saul and Fred Kelly arrive in Manitouwadge, a mining town. The community where Saul lives is... (full context)
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Fred introduces Saul to his family. He has three children: Garrett, Howard, and Virgil. Virgil is captain of... (full context)
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Preparing for his first scrimmage with the Moose, Saul notices that his teammates are very serious and mature. Nobody talks to him. Fred Kelly... (full context)
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The scrimmage begins, and Saul hangs back from the action, studying the way the other players move. Quickly, he learns... (full context)
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As the scrimmage goes on, it becomes clear that Saul is one of the finest players on the team. The opposing players shove him with... (full context)
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After practice, Fred Kelly smiles and tells Saul, “Welcome to the Moose.” Virgil hands him a soda, and he drinks it, proudly thinking,... (full context)
Chapter 26
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In the coming weeks, Saul familiarizes himself with the rituals of playing hockey for the Moose. He and the other... (full context)
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Saul’s hockey games with the Moose are challenging, but also exhilarating. He and his teammates play... (full context)
Chapter 27
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...a hockey team, and kids grow up aspiring to play for their team one day. Saul is proud to play with the Moose, and he also enjoys traveling to other Indigenous... (full context)
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Saul also likes his adopted parents, Fred Kelly and Martha Kelly. He gets along with his... (full context)
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During his second winter in his new community, Saul begins waking up early and practicing hockey with Virgil. Nearly everyone Saul plays hockey with... (full context)
Chapter 28
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In his second year with the Moose, Saul and his teammates win most of their games. Saul maintains his teammates’ respect, and gets... (full context)
Chapter 29
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One day, while Saul and his teammates are playing a game, they notice a group of “white guys” watching.... (full context)
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Saul makes the resolution to “bring his best game” to the upcoming match with the team... (full context)
Chapter 30
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...challengers. The arena is very new and full of the team’s trophies from previous years. Saul can sense that his teammates are intimidated by the arena. Furthermore, Fred Kelly was unable... (full context)
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The Moose players prepare for the game. The crowd laughs at the sight of Saul and yells that he must be the Moose team’s mascot. Virgil tells his teammates to... (full context)
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The game begins, and Saul is immediately stunned by the opposing team’s talent. After only a couple minutes, the score... (full context)
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With seven minutes left in the game, the Moose call for a timeout. Saul can see the fear in his teammates’ eyes. The game resumes, and he pushes himself... (full context)
Chapter 31
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The Moose’s hockey games become more violent, especially when they play against white teams. Sometimes, Saul encounters white players who try to “rough him up” on the rink by playing more... (full context)
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...many fans, see the Moose as “brown faces,” nothing more. Once, after winning a game, Saul and his teammates go to a local café to celebrate their victory. A group of... (full context)
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Later, Saul learns that the white men beat up the Moose players and urinated on them. Virgil... (full context)
Chapter 32
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After the events of the previous chapter, Saul starts to notice small things about the Moose team’s games with white opponents—for example, many... (full context)
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...team called the Nuggets. When it begins, the Moose take an early lead. But whenever Saul scores a goal, fans of the Nuggets throw trash at him. The game ends with... (full context)
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...the Moose players face a team called the Clippers. One of the Clippers players tells Saul, “Watch your head,” just before the game begins. During the game, Clipper players slash Saul’s... (full context)
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In the next game, players push and shove Saul, and even the fans spit at him. The fans throw so much trash into the... (full context)
Chapter 33
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The chapter begins after the tournament is over. Saul and the Moose have won the tournament, despite the bullying of the crowd. They’ve won... (full context)
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...its victory in the tournament that a sports scout named Jack Lanahan shows up at Saul’s practices, claiming that he wants to recruit Saul for professional play in the NHL. (full context)
Chapter 34
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Immediately following the events of the previous chapter, Saul goes to speak with Jack Lanahan, the NHL scout. Lanahan greets Saul and praises him... (full context)
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Lanahan can sees that Saul is wary about moving to a higher level. He tells Saul a little about why... (full context)
Chapter 35
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Saul takes three full weeks to decide whether to accept Jack Lanahan’s offer. His teammates encourage... (full context)
Chapter 36
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In the end, Saul finishes up his season with the Moose and then accepts Jack Lanahan’s offer to train... (full context)
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A few months shy of seventeen, Saul says goodbye to his adopted family and boards a bus to Toronto, where he’ll be... (full context)
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Virgil tells Saul, “You’re like a brother to me.” Saul nods and explains that he used to have... (full context)
Chapter 37
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As soon as Saul arrives in Toronto, he thinks that the city is a “chimera”—a mythological beast with a... (full context)
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Saul stays with an elderly couple, Elissa and Patrick Sheehan. Their family members have played hockey... (full context)
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Saul trains hard with the other recruits. During scrimmages, many of the other players ignore Saul... (full context)
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During one scrimmage, Saul begins to excel on the ice. His teammate pushes him and whispers not to make... (full context)
Chapter 38
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As a rookie, Saul is appointed “center” on the Marlboro team—a much-desired position. During a press interview, Saul tells... (full context)
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The Marlboros face many excellent teams during Saul’s first season. The press regularly describes Saul’s achievements on the ice using turns of phrase... (full context)
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Saul becomes angry with journalists, fans, and other players who belittle him for being an Indigenous... (full context)
Chapter 39
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Saul remembers a girl from St. Jerome’s, whose name was Rebecca Wolf. Rebecca was a beautiful,... (full context)
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...a traditional Indigenous Canadian song. Shortly afterwards, she stabbed herself with a knife and died. Saul and his classmates proceeded to sing the song Rebecca sang when she was mourning the... (full context)
Chapter 40
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Saul arrives back in Manitouwadge and walks from the bus stop to the Kelly house. Virgil... (full context)
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Saul tells Virgil that he intends to work in the mines or the local mill. When... (full context)
Chapter 41
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Saul begins working in the forest as a “deadfall bucker.” This means that he’s responsible for... (full context)
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Saul’s coworkers are gruff white men. They drink heavily, and often call Saul insulting names like... (full context)
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One night, a large coworker of Saul’s named Jorgenson gets drunk and tries to punch Saul. Saul blocks the punch and grabs... (full context)
Chapter 42
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Saul is growing into an angry young man. He’s only seventeen, but he has already experienced... (full context)
Chapter 43
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Saul leaves the town of Manitouwadge at the age of eighteen. Fred Kelly warns Saul that... (full context)
Chapter 44
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Saul takes one last walk through the Kelly house, and then drives away from it. In... (full context)
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Saul takes comfort in drinking. When he’s drunk, he thinks he becomes funnier, and making it... (full context)
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Saul’s new life is dim—“Things glimmered,” he recalls, but “never shone.” (full context)
Chapter 45
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The year is 1978, and Saul has arrived in northern Ontario. He finds a place to stay and then goes to... (full context)
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Ervin proceeds to order Saul drink and food. For the next couple of months, he is Saul’s constant companion. Ervin,... (full context)
Chapter 46
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Saul and Ervin stay up late playing cards and listening to the radio. Ervin, Saul writes,... (full context)
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At first, Saul follows Ervin’s encouragement and cuts down on drinking. But then, he begins drinking in secret,... (full context)
Chapter 47
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After his time on Ervin’s farm, Saul begins to drink even more. He understands that alcohol is killing him, even though he... (full context)
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Saul tries to stop drinking entirely. He winds up getting seizures—a symptom of withdrawal—and has to... (full context)
Chapter 48
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Saul writes that he finds it difficult to write anything about his time in the New... (full context)
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Saul spends much of his time at the New Dawn Center exploring the facility’s grounds. One... (full context)
Chapter 49
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Saul prepares to leave the New Dawn Center. He tells Moses that he needs to go... (full context)
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Saul catches the bus back to White River, and takes a cab to St. Jerome’s. There,... (full context)
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Saul walks around the St. Jerome’s campus and finds himself remembering his time with Father Leboutilier.... (full context)
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Saul begins to feel physically ill. He thinks about the racism and abuse that he experienced... (full context)
Chapter 50
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Saul catches the bus to Kenora, and then takes a taxi out to Minaki. Then, he... (full context)
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That night, Saul camps by the side of the river. He remembers Father Leboutilier’s words, “You’re free,” and... (full context)
Chapter 51
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The next afternoon, Saul reaches Gods Lake. He docks his boat and comes ashore. There, he begins to see... (full context)
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Saul begins to weep so profusely that he falls to his knees. After weeping for what... (full context)
Chapter 52
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Saul returns to the New Dawn Center. He’s not sure what he hopes to get out... (full context)
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After talking with Moses, Saul decides to visit Fred Kelly and Martha Kelly. He drives to their town, and when... (full context)
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Saul admits to Fred and Martha that there are things about his past which he hadn’t... (full context)
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Fred gives Saul some advice: “Keep your stick on the ice and your feet moving. Time will take... (full context)
Chapter 53
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Fred Kelly informs Saul that Virgil now works in a mine and has three children. Saul and Fred have... (full context)
Chapter 54
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Saul goes to the nearby ice rink, where he finds Virgil coaching the boys. Saul watches... (full context)
Chapter 55
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After practice, Saul and Virgil sit on the bleachers and talk. Saul isn’t sure where to begin, but... (full context)
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Virgil tells Saul that he should come back to town and get a job. He adds that Saul... (full context)
Chapter 56
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That night, Saul goes to the hockey rink with a used pair of skates and a hockey stick.... (full context)
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In the midst of the game, Saul turns and sees that Virgil, Fred, and Martha have been watching him play. Behind Virgil... (full context)