Journey’s End

by

R.C. Sherriff

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Journey’s End can help.

Hibbert Character Analysis

An officer in Stanhope’s infantry. Hibbert is so afraid of dying in the trenches that he pretends to suffer from an acute case of neuralgia (intense nerve pain). He seizes every opportunity to talk about his physical pain in front of Stanhope, finally approaching the captain and claiming that he will have to go home on account of this overbearing condition. However, he’s caught off guard when Stanhope tells him he can’t leave and says that he isn’t allowed to go to the doctor, either. When Hibbert presses Stanhope, he discovers that Stanhope is tired of soldiers faking various illnesses in order to excuse themselves from duty. During this conversation, Hibbert grows more and more hysterical, until finally he admits that the real reason he wants to leave is because he can’t stand the stress and fear that comes along with being at war. To his surprise, Stanhope actually begins to empathize with this sentiment, revealing that he too feels this way. From this point on, Hibbert stops complaining of neuralgia, forming an unlikely bond with Stanhope, who helps him through by boosting his confidence and agreeing to work watch shifts with him. When the Germans finally stage their massive attack, Hibbert seems intentionally slow to join the fighting, but he eventually leaves the safety of the dugout to face the enemy.

Hibbert Quotes in Journey’s End

The Journey’s End quotes below are all either spoken by Hibbert or refer to Hibbert. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Friendship and Human Interaction Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of Journey’s End published in 1929.
Act 2, Scene 2 Quotes

Stanhope! I’ve tried like hell—I swear I have. Ever since I came out here I’ve hated and loathed it. Every sound up there makes me all—cold and sick. I’m different to—to the others—you don’t understand. It’s got worse and worse, and now I can’t bear it any longer. I’ll never go up those steps again—into the line—with the men looking at me—and knowing—I’d rather die here. [He is sitting on STANHOPE’S bed, crying without effort to restrain himself.]

Related Characters: Hibbert (speaker), Stanhope
Page Number: 57
Explanation and Analysis:

If you went—and left Osborne and Trotter and Raleigh and all those men up there to do your work—could you ever look a man straight in the face again—in all your life! [There is silence again.] You may be wounded. Then you can go home and feel proud—and if you’re killed you—you won’t have to stand this hell any more. I might have fired just now. If I had you would have been dead now. But you’re still alive—with a straight fighting chance of coming through. Take the chance, old chap, and stand in with Osborne and Trotter and Raleigh. Don’t you think it worth standing in with men like that?—when you know they all feel like you do—in their hearts—and just go on sticking it because they know it’s—it’s the only thing a decent man can do.

Related Characters: Stanhope (speaker), Raleigh, Osborne, Hibbert, Trotter
Page Number: 58
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Journey’s End LitChart as a printable PDF.
Journey’s End PDF

Hibbert Character Timeline in Journey’s End

The timeline below shows where the character Hibbert appears in Journey’s End. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
...dugout. Meanwhile, Osborne and Stanhope decide which beds they’ll take while Stanhope drinks whiskey. When Hibbert (the fourth and final officer) enters, he claims that he has a bad case of... (full context)
Friendship and Human Interaction Theme Icon
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
...a drunken sleep, and Osborne calls Mason and tells him to wake him (Osborne) and Hibbert at certain intervals throughout the night so they can stand watch. (full context)
Act 2, Scene 2
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
...he likes fish, which has been “sent up from rail-head for supper.” Once he leaves, Hibbert enters and tells Stanhope that his neuralgia has become too excruciating to ignore. “I know,”... (full context)
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
Hibbert claims the doctor will surely send him to the hospital once he sees his condition,... (full context)
Friendship and Human Interaction Theme Icon
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
As Stanhope and Hibbert glare at one another, Hibbert breaks into a high laugh, exclaiming, “Go on, then, shoot!”... (full context)
Friendship and Human Interaction Theme Icon
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
Stanhope reveals to Hibbert that the only way he himself can bear the war is by drinking. He then... (full context)
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
Repitition, Futility, and Perspective Theme Icon
When Hibbert leaves, Osborne enters, and Stanhope informs him that he and Raleigh will be leading the... (full context)
Anticipation, Expectations, and Uncertainty Theme Icon
Repitition, Futility, and Perspective Theme Icon
Stanhope comes into the dugout and fetches Hibbert from the sleeping quarters, and together they go on watch. After they leave, Trotter tells... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 2
Friendship and Human Interaction Theme Icon
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
That night, Trotter, Stanhope, and Hibbert enjoy the fresh chicken, the bottles of champagne, and the cigars brought in by the... (full context)
Friendship and Human Interaction Theme Icon
...raid works Stanhope into anger, so he tells his officers to go to bed. However, Hibbert is so drunk he doesn’t recognize Stanhope’s indignation, instead cheekily suggesting that Stanhope should go... (full context)
Friendship and Human Interaction Theme Icon
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
“You insulted Trotter and Hibbert by not coming,” Stanhope tells Raleigh. After a moment of silence, Raleigh says, “I’m awfully... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 3
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
...and gives him tea. Trotter, for his part, has already gotten dressed and woken up Hibbert and Raleigh. Soon enough the Sergeant-Major arrives, and Stanhope tells him to make sure all... (full context)
Friendship and Human Interaction Theme Icon
Fear and Coping Theme Icon
...soon.” The sound of artillery and bombs is quite steady now, and Stanhope calls to Hibbert, who emerges looking quite haggard and pale. “You want me to go up now?” he... (full context)