Julius Caesar

Mark Antony Character Analysis

Read our modern English translation.
Caesar's friend. He desires to make Caesar king, and virtually single-handedly brings about the undoing of the conspirators after Caesar's murder. Described as a passionate man who loves art and music, and teased even by Caesar for staying out late at parties, Antony is the opposite of the coldly logical Brutus. He was not sharp enough to suspect the plot against Caesar, but it is Antony's masterful speech to the plebeians that stirs them up against his killers. Antony can also be devious when necessary, planning to cheat the people by altering Caesar's will, and to eliminate his ally Lepidus. It is the combination of these qualities that make him a better all-around politician—and replacement for Caesar—than either Brutus or Cassius.

Mark Antony Quotes in Julius Caesar

The Julius Caesar quotes below are all either spoken by Mark Antony or refer to Mark Antony. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the The Folger Shakespeare Library edition of Julius Caesar published in 1992.
Act 3, scene 1 Quotes
Cry Havoc! and let slip the dogs of war.
Related Characters: Mark Antony (speaker)
Related Symbols: Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 3.1.299
Explanation and Analysis:

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Act 3, scene 2 Quotes
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault;
And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest, —
For Brutus is an honorable man;
So are they all, all honorable men, —
Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honorable man.
Related Characters: Mark Antony (speaker), Julius Caesar, Marcus Brutus
Related Symbols: Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 3.2.82-96
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 5, scene 5 Quotes
This was the noblest Roman of all
All the conspirators, save only he,
Did that they did in envy of great Caesar;
He only, in a general honest thought,
And common good to all, made one of them.
His life was gentle; and the elements
So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up
And say to all the world, "This was a man."
Related Characters: Mark Antony (speaker), Julius Caesar, Marcus Brutus
Related Symbols: Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 5.5.74-81
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

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Mark Antony Character Timeline in Julius Caesar

The timeline below shows where the character Mark Antony appears in Julius Caesar. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, scene 2
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Caesar enters with Antony, Calpurnia, Portia, Decius, Cicero, Brutus, Cassius, and Casca, followed by a Soothsayer and many Plebeians,... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
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As he passes in the procession, Caesar tells Antony that Cassius looks too "lean and hungry" (1.2.195) to be trusted, saying it's safer to... (full context)
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Once Caesar is gone, Casca tells Brutus and Cassius that Antony offered Caesar a crown three times, and that Caesar refused it, causing the crowd to... (full context)
Act 2, scene 1
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
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After Decius asks whether only Caesar will be killed, Cassius suggests they kill Antony as well, since he may oppose them afterwards. Brutus says that without Caesar, Antony will... (full context)
Act 2, scene 2
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
...Capitol after all. Cassius, Brutus, Ligarius, Metellus, Casca, Trebonius, and Cinna enter to escort him. Antony enters a moment later, and Caesar teases him about being up late partying. Caesar suggests... (full context)
Act 3, scene 1
Logic and Language Theme Icon
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Caesar approaches the Capitol with the conspirators, followed by Antony, Lepidus, Publius, Popillius, and other Senators. Caesar notices the Soothsayer, and tells him his prophecy... (full context)
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In the Capitol, Trebonius talks with Antony, to draw him away. Metellus kneels before Caesar to beg for the repeal of his... (full context)
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Antony's servant enters with a message. Antony sends word that he will support Brutus if he... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
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Antony enters, and is moved by the sight of Caesar's body. He says that if the... (full context)
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Alone, Antony predicts that a terrible war will engulf Rome as a result of Caesar's murder. A... (full context)
Act 3, scene 2
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Antony has entered with Caesar's body in a coffin. Brutus departs, turning the pulpit over to... (full context)
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Antony says that he has "come to bury Caesar, not to praise him" (3.2.71). He says... (full context)
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Antony regains his composure, and says he has no intention of wronging the honorable Brutus and... (full context)
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Antony describes Caesar's murder in graphic terms, and then uncovers Caesar's body. The crowd is ready... (full context)
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Antony finally reads Caesar's will, which promises a sum of money to every citizen, and announces... (full context)
Act 4, scene 1
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At Antony's house, Antony, Octavius, and Lepidus make a list of those who should be executed for... (full context)
Act 4, scene 2
Act 5, scene 1
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Antony and Octavius wait on the battlefield. Antony says that Brutus and Cassius are only attacking... (full context)
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Brutus and Cassius speak with Antony and Octavius before the battle. They taunt each other. Brutus and Cassius call Octavius young... (full context)
Act 5, scene 3
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...loss of those troops and by deserters, is losing his half of the battle to Antony. He sends Titinius on horseback to see whether his camp is being burned, and sends... (full context)
Act 5, scene 4
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Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...with them. Cato is killed, but Lucillius pretends to be Brutus and is taken prisoner. Antony enters, and recognizes Lucillius, who says that Brutus will never be captured alive. Antony spares... (full context)
Act 5, scene 5
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Brutus and his attendants stop to rest, with Antony's men closing in. Knowing that he is beaten, and revealing that he has seen Caesar's... (full context)
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Antony and Octavius enter, with soldiers, and Lucillius and Massala captive. Strato is made a servant... (full context)
Act 4, scene 3
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...recent anger was uncharacteristic of him. Brutus tells Cassius that Portia, afraid that Octavius and Antony will win, has committed suicide by swallowing hot coals. Cassius expresses sympathy, but Brutus says... (full context)
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Titinius and Messala enter with news from Rome. They say that Antony, Octavius, and Lepidus have executed many senators. After some hesitation, Messala tells Brutus of Portia's... (full context)