Just Mercy

Just Mercy

Minnie McMillian Character Analysis

Minnie is Walter McMillian’s wife. Like Walter, she is from the poor black community just outside of Monroeville. She is resilient, patient, intelligent and hospitable. She supports and cares for her five children during Walter’s incarceration. They separate after Walter’s release, but she remains involved in his life and in his care during his long-term illness.
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Minnie McMillian Character Timeline in Just Mercy

The timeline below shows where the character Minnie McMillian appears in Just Mercy. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Mockingbird Players
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Walter had a history of cheating on his wife, Minnie, with whom he had five children. In 1986, at 43, Walter was involved with a... (full context)
Chapter 5: Of the Coming of John
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...home. He first notices the home’s disrepair and the familiar signs of poverty. Walter’s wife Minnie warmly greets Stevenson and she offers him something to eat. She discusses her difficult 12-hour... (full context)
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Stevenson, Minnie and Jackie travel down a long, isolated road, until they reach “an entire community hidden... (full context)
Chapter 11: I’ll Fly Away
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...The State decides to join rather than oppose the motion. Before the hearing, Stevenson visits Minnie to pick up a suit for Walter. Minnie asks Stevenson to talk to Walter about... (full context)
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The morning of the hearing, Stevenson tells Walter about his conversation with Minnie. Walter seems sad, but he tells Stevenson: “nothing can really spoil getting your freedom back.”... (full context)
Chapter 13: Recovery
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...his story was “effective” in winning audience sympathy and indignation about his experiences. Walter and Minnie peacefully separate, and Walter stays a while with his sister in Florida. Walter thinks often... (full context)