Just Mercy

Just Mercy

District Attorney Tom Chapman Character Analysis

Chapman replaces Ted Pearson as the District Attorney for Monroe County. Unlike Pearson, he has a history of working as a public defender. He initially defends the State’s conviction of Walter McMillian and opposes EJI’s efforts. He eventually pursues his own investigation into Walter’s case and, following the results, switches his position to support Walter.
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District Attorney Tom Chapman Character Timeline in Just Mercy

The timeline below shows where the character District Attorney Tom Chapman appears in Just Mercy. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 5: Of the Coming of John
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...the state doesn’t offer. He arranges to meet with the state’s new District Attorney, Tom Chapman. Unlike former District Attorney Ted Pearson, Chapman has a history in defense, so Stevenson is... (full context)
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During their meeting at the Monroe County Courthouse, Stevenson’s hopes fade as Chapman expresses his unquestioning belief in Walter’s guilt, based mostly on the intensity of the local... (full context)
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Stevenson tells Darnell about his meeting with Tom Chapman. Darnell is relieved that the charges are being dropped, but he is shaken and disheartened... (full context)
Chapter 7: Justice Denied
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...they too see something “unusual” about Walter’s case. In a meeting at District Attorney Tom Chapman’s office, Stevenson meets Sherriff Tate and Investigator Larry Ikner for the first time. At this... (full context)
Chapter 9: I’m Here
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Stevenson describes the situation preceding Walter’s Rule 32 hearing. Stevenson suggests that District Attorney Tom Chapman seriously reconsider his position before the trial. Chapman instead moves forward with hiring Assistant Attorney... (full context)
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...find the courtroom full of familiar faces from Walter’s family and community. He notices that Chapman and Valeska appear disgruntled by their presence. (full context)
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...be white and have no “loyalties” to Walter. That night, Michael and Stevenson consider whether Chapman will switch sides given how well the hearing is going for Walter. (full context)
Chapter 11: I’ll Fly Away
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...produce a story about Walter’s case. Their reporters come to Monroeville and interview Walter, Myers, Chapman, and everyone involved in the case. Even before the story airs, the local newspapers release... (full context)
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...he tells Stevenson: “nothing can really spoil getting your freedom back.” At the courthouse, Tom Chapman tells Stevenson that he has learned things that he didn’t realize he “had to learn.”... (full context)