Just Mercy

Just Mercy

Ronda Morrison Character Analysis

Ronda Morrison was the young adult daughter of an influential local white family in Monroeville. On November 1st, 1986, Ronda was found murdered at her workplace, Monroe Cleaners. The white community is baffled by the mysterious murder of a beloved young woman. With no other suspects, Walter is falsely indicted for Ronda’s murder. Years later, Stevenson discovers reports of a white man who may have been stalking Ronda prior to her death. At the time of the book’s publication, the real murder still hasn’t been found.
Get the entire Just Mercy LitChart as a printable PDF.
Just mercy.pdf.medium

Ronda Morrison Character Timeline in Just Mercy

The timeline below shows where the character Ronda Morrison appears in Just Mercy. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Mockingbird Players
Systemic Power, Oppression, and Dehumanization Theme Icon
Media and Public Opinion Theme Icon
A few weeks after Walter testifies at Karen Kelly’s custody hearing, the body of Ronda Morrison is found on the floor of Monroe Cleaners. Rhonda was a young white woman... (full context)
Systemic Power, Oppression, and Dehumanization Theme Icon
Empathy, Mercy, and Humanization Theme Icon
Media and Public Opinion Theme Icon
...boyfriend” collaborated, not only in killing Vickie Pittman, but that he and Walter also murdered Ronda Morrison. When Myers is unable to identify Walter out of several black men in a... (full context)
Chapter 3: Trials and Tribulations
Systemic Power, Oppression, and Dehumanization Theme Icon
Media and Public Opinion Theme Icon
...of 1987 on sodomy charges (under anti-homosexuality laws) and questioned him about the murder of Ronda Morrison. In response to Walter’s bewilderment, Tate repeatedly called him a “nigger” and threatened to... (full context)
Systemic Power, Oppression, and Dehumanization Theme Icon
Media and Public Opinion Theme Icon
...Myers went to buy cigarettes and then came back. Walter returned, stating he had killed Ronda Morrison. He dropped Myers back off at the gas station, threatening to kill him if... (full context)
Resistance and Advocacy Theme Icon
Systemic Power, Oppression, and Dehumanization Theme Icon
Media and Public Opinion Theme Icon
The police indict Walter for the murder of Ronda Morrison to the “joy and relief” of the white community. Sherriff Tate still hasn’t investigated... (full context)
Resistance and Advocacy Theme Icon
Systemic Power, Oppression, and Dehumanization Theme Icon
Media and Public Opinion Theme Icon
...his testimony. He adds that he went into Monroeville Cleaners and saw Walter standing over Ronda’s body, and that an unnamed gray-haired man organized the murder and ordered Walter to shoot... (full context)
Chapter 5: Of the Coming of John
Systemic Power, Oppression, and Dehumanization Theme Icon
...disprove the testimony of Bill Hooks because they were working together on the morning of Ronda’s death. Darnell explains that after Walter’s conviction, he had informed Chestnut and Boynton, but Judge... (full context)
Chapter 7: Justice Denied
Resistance and Advocacy Theme Icon
Empathy, Mercy, and Humanization Theme Icon
...discredited Bill Hook’s testimony by confirming that the mechanic modified Walter’s truck six months after Ronda’s murder. Finally, a clerk at the store where Myers was asked to identify Walter confirms... (full context)
Chapter 9: I’m Here
Resistance and Advocacy Theme Icon
Systemic Power, Oppression, and Dehumanization Theme Icon
...records to prove that Walter’s truck was modified to be a “low-rider” six months after Ronda’s murder, calling into question the original testimonies of Bill Hooks and Joe Hightower against Walter.... (full context)
Chapter 11: I’ll Fly Away
Systemic Power, Oppression, and Dehumanization Theme Icon
...caller, EJI determined he was the most likely suspect. EJI discovered that, before her death, Ronda Morrison may have been stalked by a white man and that a white man was... (full context)