Kaffir Boy

Kaffir Boy

by

Mark Mathabane

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Scaramouche Character Analysis

Scaramouche is a Coloured man who decides to become Mathabane’s tennis coach after he sees him practicing and recognizes his potential. Although Scaramouche does not play an outsized role in the story, Mathabane recognizes him as an important figure in his life, particularly as a “confidant” and “surrogate father,” since Mathabane’s relationship with his own father is so strained. Scaramouche encourages Mathabane throughout his tennis career, pushing him to compete and play with more advanced athletes whenever possible.

Scaramouche Quotes in Kaffir Boy

The Kaffir Boy quotes below are all either spoken by Scaramouche or refer to Scaramouche. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Touchstone edition of Kaffir Boy published in 1986.
Chapter 34 Quotes

The government generally treated Coloureds slightly better by giving them better jobs, better housing and better education than blacks. As a result most of the Coloureds were ashamed of their black blood, and often their prejudice against blacks was fiercer than the white man’s. But a new generation of young Coloureds, which saw itself as more black than white, was emerging, and it embraced the entire range of black aspirations.

Related Characters: Johannes Mark Mathabane (speaker), Scaramouche
Page Number: 211
Explanation and Analysis:
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Kaffir Boy PDF

Scaramouche Character Timeline in Kaffir Boy

The timeline below shows where the character Scaramouche appears in Kaffir Boy. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 34
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
Tribal Identity vs. Modern Education Theme Icon
...Mathabane spends more time practicing tennis against the wall. One day, a Coloured man named Scaramouche notices him and starts critiquing his form and offering tips. Since Coloured people are mixed... (full context)
Chapter 35
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
Personal Prejudice Theme Icon
Tribal Identity vs. Modern Education Theme Icon
Tennis quickly becomes Mathabane’s favorite sport, and Scaramouche proves himself a valuable mentor, both as a coach and a “surrogate father.” Scaramouche often... (full context)
Chapter 37
Tribal Identity vs. Modern Education Theme Icon
...yoga, jogging, and abstinence. His game begins improving to the point that he even beats Scaramouche on occasion. Mathabane becomes the captain of a local tennis team and leads the team... (full context)
Chapter 45
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
Tribal Identity vs. Modern Education Theme Icon
...team in Soweto. Since Mathabane’s school is still closed, he spends his days training with Scaramouche in preparation for the championship. Thought the government considers canceling the tournament due to protests,... (full context)
Chapter 46
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
Personal Prejudice Theme Icon
Scaramouche introduces Mathabane to Andre Zietsman, a white tennis player from South African who has just... (full context)
Chapter 49
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
Personal Prejudice Theme Icon
Anger, Hatred, and Violence Theme Icon
...banned for life from black tennis.” He receives threatening anonymous letters telling him to quit. Scaramouche and Wilfred advise Mathabane to play the tournament, while Mathabane’s mother advises him to quit.... (full context)
Chapter 51
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
Personal Prejudice Theme Icon
...Mathabane that he won’t improve his game without good competition from elite white players. With Scaramouche, Andre, and Wilfred’s support, Mathabane decides to apply for membership at the Wanderer’s Club. When... (full context)