Kaffir Boy

Kaffir Boy

by

Mark Mathabane

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Uncle Piet Character Analysis

Uncle Piet is Mathabane’s uncle, Aunt Bushy’s brother, and Granny’s son, though he’s not much older than Mathabane. Uncle Piet attends school until Granny cannot afford the fees. He drops out and starts working in a factory, using his income to help Granny and to fund some of Mathabane’s education.

Uncle Piet Quotes in Kaffir Boy

The Kaffir Boy quotes below are all either spoken by Uncle Piet or refer to Uncle Piet. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Touchstone edition of Kaffir Boy published in 1986.
Chapter 19 Quotes

[Uncle Piet] had been released—without being charged—and given a warning that he better get himself a pass soon, for he was getting too tall and was beginning to wear long pants, factors which alone made him adult enough to carry a pass.

Related Characters: Johannes Mark Mathabane (speaker), Uncle Piet
Related Symbols: Passbooks
Page Number: 108
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Kaffir Boy LitChart as a printable PDF.
Kaffir Boy PDF

Uncle Piet Character Timeline in Kaffir Boy

The timeline below shows where the character Uncle Piet appears in Kaffir Boy. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 19
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
Personal Prejudice Theme Icon
Anger, Hatred, and Violence Theme Icon
Suffering, Survival, and Trauma Theme Icon
...find the “indomitable matriarch” anxiously waiting. Peri-Urban police have just arrested her 13-year-old son, Mathabane’s Uncle Piet . Granny had sent him to the store before school to buy some bread, but... (full context)
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
Personal Prejudice Theme Icon
Anger, Hatred, and Violence Theme Icon
Suffering, Survival, and Trauma Theme Icon
Mathabane’s mother and Granny resolve to get Uncle Piet out of jail, otherwise he may be sent to a potato farm where black men... (full context)
Chapter 30
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
Personal Prejudice Theme Icon
Anger, Hatred, and Violence Theme Icon
...moves into a smaller shack and worries that she won’t be able to pay for Uncle Piet or his sister Aunt Bushy’s education much longer, since tuition rises while Granny’s wage stay... (full context)
Chapter 33
Apartheid’s Structural Oppression Theme Icon
Suffering, Survival, and Trauma Theme Icon
...opened. Mathabane’s father starts drinking and gambling their money away once again. Aunt Bushy and Uncle Piet both drop out of school to help Granny, but Aunt Bushy becomes pregnant soon after,... (full context)
Chapter 37
Tribal Identity vs. Modern Education Theme Icon
...up with money for uniforms and books. The family pitches in, even Aunt Bushy and Uncle PietUncle Piet tells Mathabane that his academic success is bringing them all honor in their... (full context)
Chapter 41
Personal Prejudice Theme Icon
Tribal Identity vs. Modern Education Theme Icon
Christianity Theme Icon
...He and his classmates struggle to understand the form until, listening to a transistor radio Uncle Piet gave him, he hears a broadcast performance of one of Shakespeare’s plays and recognizes the... (full context)