Kanthapura

by

Raja Rao

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Refers to any song performance with religious themes.

Bhajan Quotes in Kanthapura

The Kanthapura quotes below are all either spoken by Bhajan or refer to Bhajan. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Oral Tradition, Writing, and Political Power Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Oxford University Press edition of Kanthapura published in 1963.
Section 11 Quotes

Changing he changes not,

Ash-smeared, he’s Parvati’s sire,

Moon on his head,

And poison in his throat,

Chant, chant, chant the name of Eesh,

Chant the name of Siva Lord!

Related Characters: Moorthy, Kenchamma, Sankar
Page Number: 113
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Kanthapura LitChart as a printable PDF.
Kanthapura PDF

Bhajan Term Timeline in Kanthapura

The timeline below shows where the term Bhajan appears in Kanthapura. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Section 1
Oral Tradition, Writing, and Political Power Theme Icon
Nationalism and Colonialism Theme Icon
Land, Geography, and Belonging Theme Icon
...and weep. A series of boys served dinner “like veritable princes,” then Lingayya plays a bhajan on his trumpet before the brahmins go to bed “with the god’s face framed within... (full context)
Section 3
Oral Tradition, Writing, and Political Power Theme Icon
Bhatta, unlike the rest of Kanthapura, wants “nothing to do with these Gandhi-bhajans.” He used to sympathize with Moorthy’s cause but gave up after visiting the city to... (full context)
Section 7
Oral Tradition, Writing, and Political Power Theme Icon
Gandhism and the Erosion of Caste Theme Icon
Land, Geography, and Belonging Theme Icon
...she prays to God for him. When he awakes, Moorthy feels stronger and leads a bhajan attended by people from throughout Kanthapura, including even Badè Khan—but very few of the brahmins.... (full context)
Section 8
Gandhism and the Erosion of Caste Theme Icon
Nationalism and Colonialism Theme Icon
...and it shall be done.” Moorthy explains his program. Fewer brahmins are coming to the bhajans, and some—like Waterfall Venkamma, Temple Rangappa, Patwari Nanjundia, Schoolmaster Devarayya, and especially Bhatta—are staunchly opposed... (full context)
Oral Tradition, Writing, and Political Power Theme Icon
Gandhism and the Erosion of Caste Theme Icon
Nationalism and Colonialism Theme Icon
That evening, Moorthy convenes a procession and gives a bhajan. Rangè Gowda begins to explain the Congress but everyone stands when Moorthy enters, which he... (full context)
Section 11
Gandhism and the Erosion of Caste Theme Icon
Land, Geography, and Belonging Theme Icon
Vasudev, Rangamma and Seenu decide to restart the bhajans that Moorthy used to perform, although in prison Moorthy warned Sankar not to let them... (full context)
Section 13
Oral Tradition, Writing, and Political Power Theme Icon
Nationalism and Colonialism Theme Icon
...and frequent visitors from the city. Seenu rings the gong to call the Gandhians for bhajans, during which Moorthy tells them stories about activists across India, like the 170 Patels that... (full context)
Section 17
Land, Geography, and Belonging Theme Icon
...nobody through the door. In the temple, they light the sacred flame and sing a bhajan for Lord Siva. (full context)