Kindred

by

Octavia E. Butler

Teachers and parents! Our Teacher Edition on Kindred makes teaching easy.

Tom Weylin Character Analysis

Rufus’ father. Tom is a harsh master to his slaves, but Dana notes that Tom is not an entirely cruel man. Tom does what he thinks is right for a man of his standing during this time period, which means putting black people “in their place” when he feels they are being too presumptuous and whipping them himself when they “deserve” punishment. Tom is also cold and distant to his own son, up to and including whipping Rufus. Tom is very dismissive of his wife Margaret. Though Tom is not necessarily a bad man, he does represent the harmful actions that many men in the south during this time period committed in order to assert their masculinity and privilege in society.

Tom Weylin Quotes in Kindred

The Kindred quotes below are all either spoken by Tom Weylin or refer to Tom Weylin. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Family and Home Theme Icon
).
Chapter 3: The Fall Quotes

The expression in her eyes had gone from sadness—she seemed almost ready to cry—to anger. Quiet, almost frightening anger. Her husband dead, three children sold, the fourth defective, and her having to thank God for the defect. She had reason for more than anger. How amazing that Weylin had sold her children and still kept her to cook his meals. How amazing that he was still alive.

Related Characters: Dana (Edana) Franklin (speaker), Sarah, Tom Weylin, Carrie
Page Number: 76
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4: The Fight Quotes

His father wasn't the monster he could have been with the power he held over his slaves. He wasn't a monster at all. Just an ordinary man who sometimes did the monstrous things his society said were legal and proper. But I had seen no particular fairness in him. He did as he pleased. If you told him he wasn't being fair, he would whip you for talking back.

Related Characters: Dana (Edana) Franklin (speaker), Rufus Weylin, Tom Weylin
Related Symbols: The Whip
Page Number: 134
Explanation and Analysis:

"Daddy's the only man I know," he said softly, "who cares as much about giving his word to a black as to a white."
"Does that bother you?"
"No! It's one of the few things about him I can respect."
"It's one of the few things about him you should copy."

Related Characters: Dana (Edana) Franklin (speaker), Rufus Weylin (speaker), Tom Weylin
Page Number: 181
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5: The Storm Quotes

South African whites had always struck me as people who would have been happier living in the nineteenth century, or the eighteenth. In fact, they were living in the past as far as their race relations went. They lived in ease and comfort supported by huge numbers of blacks whom they kept in poverty and held in contempt. Tom Weylin would have felt right at home.

Related Characters: Dana (Edana) Franklin (speaker), Tom Weylin
Page Number: 196
Explanation and Analysis:

Carrie clasped her hands around her neck again. Then she drew closer to me and clasped them around my neck. Finally, she went over to the crib that her youngest child had recently outgrown and there, symbolically, clasped her hands again, leaving enough of an open circle for a small neck…. Margaret Weylin could not run the plantation. Both the land and the people would be sold. And if Tom Weylin was any example, the people would be sold without regard for family ties.

Page Number: 223
Explanation and Analysis:
Epilogue Quotes

"I wonder whether the children were allowed to stay together—maybe stay with Sarah."
"You've looked," he said. "And you've found no records. You'll probably never know."
I touched the scar Tom Weylin's boot had left on my face, touched my empty left sleeve. "I know," I repeated. "Why did I even want to come here. You'd think I would have had enough of the past."
"You probably needed to come for the same reason I did." He shrugged. "To try to understand. To touch solid evidence that those people existed.”

Related Characters: Dana (Edana) Franklin (speaker), Kevin Franklin (speaker), Tom Weylin
Related Symbols: Dana’s Lost Left Arm
Page Number: 264
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Kindred LitChart as a printable PDF.
Kindred PDF

Tom Weylin Quotes in Kindred

The Kindred quotes below are all either spoken by Tom Weylin or refer to Tom Weylin. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Family and Home Theme Icon
).
Chapter 3: The Fall Quotes

The expression in her eyes had gone from sadness—she seemed almost ready to cry—to anger. Quiet, almost frightening anger. Her husband dead, three children sold, the fourth defective, and her having to thank God for the defect. She had reason for more than anger. How amazing that Weylin had sold her children and still kept her to cook his meals. How amazing that he was still alive.

Related Characters: Dana (Edana) Franklin (speaker), Sarah, Tom Weylin, Carrie
Page Number: 76
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4: The Fight Quotes

His father wasn't the monster he could have been with the power he held over his slaves. He wasn't a monster at all. Just an ordinary man who sometimes did the monstrous things his society said were legal and proper. But I had seen no particular fairness in him. He did as he pleased. If you told him he wasn't being fair, he would whip you for talking back.

Related Characters: Dana (Edana) Franklin (speaker), Rufus Weylin, Tom Weylin
Related Symbols: The Whip
Page Number: 134
Explanation and Analysis:

"Daddy's the only man I know," he said softly, "who cares as much about giving his word to a black as to a white."
"Does that bother you?"
"No! It's one of the few things about him I can respect."
"It's one of the few things about him you should copy."

Related Characters: Dana (Edana) Franklin (speaker), Rufus Weylin (speaker), Tom Weylin
Page Number: 181
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5: The Storm Quotes

South African whites had always struck me as people who would have been happier living in the nineteenth century, or the eighteenth. In fact, they were living in the past as far as their race relations went. They lived in ease and comfort supported by huge numbers of blacks whom they kept in poverty and held in contempt. Tom Weylin would have felt right at home.

Related Characters: Dana (Edana) Franklin (speaker), Tom Weylin
Page Number: 196
Explanation and Analysis:

Carrie clasped her hands around her neck again. Then she drew closer to me and clasped them around my neck. Finally, she went over to the crib that her youngest child had recently outgrown and there, symbolically, clasped her hands again, leaving enough of an open circle for a small neck…. Margaret Weylin could not run the plantation. Both the land and the people would be sold. And if Tom Weylin was any example, the people would be sold without regard for family ties.

Page Number: 223
Explanation and Analysis:
Epilogue Quotes

"I wonder whether the children were allowed to stay together—maybe stay with Sarah."
"You've looked," he said. "And you've found no records. You'll probably never know."
I touched the scar Tom Weylin's boot had left on my face, touched my empty left sleeve. "I know," I repeated. "Why did I even want to come here. You'd think I would have had enough of the past."
"You probably needed to come for the same reason I did." He shrugged. "To try to understand. To touch solid evidence that those people existed.”

Related Characters: Dana (Edana) Franklin (speaker), Kevin Franklin (speaker), Tom Weylin
Related Symbols: Dana’s Lost Left Arm
Page Number: 264
Explanation and Analysis: