Lady Audley’s Secret

Lady Audley’s Secret

by

Mary Elizabeth Braddon

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George Talboys Character Analysis

George Talboys is the friend of Robert Audley, the first husband of Lady Audley, and the brother of Clara Talboys. He comes from a wealthy family and was a dragoon (a mounted infantry man) in the British army before falling in love with and marrying the beautiful yet impoverished Helen Maldon (a.k.a. Lady Audley). As a result, George’s strict father, Harcourt Talboys, disowns his son for marrying below his station. Without his father’s wealth, George, Helen, and their infant son Georgey live in poverty. George decides his family would be better off without him and abandons his wife and son to go gold prospecting in Australia. At the beginning of the novel, George is returning to England after three and a half years abroad when he finds a newspaper announcement of his wife’s recent death. George’s subsequent, mysterious disappearance after visiting Audley Court motivates Robert to seek justice for his friend. At the end of the novel, it is revealed that, fearing discovery, Lady Audley had pushed her husband down a well; unbeknownst to her, George survived the fall. George can be viewed at once as a victim of Lady Audley’s cruel manipulations and a patriarchal villain, whose abandonment of his wife and child is what forces Helen to remarry in order to escape a life of abject poverty.

George Talboys Quotes in Lady Audley’s Secret

The Lady Audley’s Secret quotes below are all either spoken by George Talboys or refer to George Talboys. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Oxford University Press edition of Lady Audley’s Secret published in 1987.
Volume 2, Chapter 4 Quotes

[Harcourt Talboys] was like his own square-built, northern-fronted, shelterless house. There were no shady nooks in his character into which one could creep for shelter from his hard daylight…with him right was right and wrong was wrong…He had cast off his only son because his only son had disobeyed him, and he was ready to cast off his only daughter at five minutes’ notice for the same reason.

Page Number: 156
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 2, Chapter 6 Quotes

“I hate women…They’re bold, brazen, abominable creatures, invented for the annoyance and destruction of their superiors. Look at this business of poor George’s! It’s all woman’s work from one end to the other. He marries a woman, and his father casts him off, penniless and professionless. He hears of the woman’s death and he breaks his heart…He goes to a woman’s house and he is never seen alive again.”

Related Symbols: Audley Court
Page Number: 178
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 2, Chapter 11 Quotes

“A conspiracy concocted by an artful woman, who had speculated upon the chances of her husband’s death, and had secured a splendid position at the risk of committing a crime…but a foolish woman, who looked at life as a game of chance, in which the best player was likely to hold the winning cards, forgetting that there is a Providence about the pitiful speculators, and that wicked secrets are never permitted to remain long hidden.”

Page Number: 228-229
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 3, Chapter 3 Quotes

“I killed him because I AM MAD! because my intellect is a little way upon the wrong side of that narrow boundary-line between sanity and insanity; because when George Talboys goaded me, as you have goaded me; and reproached me, and threatened me; my mind, never properly balanced, utterly lost its balance; and I was mad!

Page Number: 294
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 3, Chapter 10 Quotes

Two years have passed since the May twilight in which Robert found his old friend; and Mr Audley’s dream of a fairy cottage had been realized…Here amongst the lilies and the rushes on the sloping bank, a brave boy of eight years old plays with a toddling baby…

Mr Audley is a rising man upon the home circuit by this time, and has distinguished himself in the great breach of promise case of Hobbs v. Nobbs.

Related Characters: Robert Audley, George Talboys, Georgey
Page Number: 378
Explanation and Analysis:

I hope no one will take objection to my story because the end of it leaves the good people all happy and at peace. If my experience of life has not been very long, it has at least been manifold; and I can safely subscribe to that which a mighty king and a great philosopher declared, when he said that neither the experience of his youth nor of his age had ever shown him ‘righteous forsaken, nor his seed begging their bread.’

Page Number: 380
Explanation and Analysis:
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Lady Audley’s Secret PDF

George Talboys Character Timeline in Lady Audley’s Secret

The timeline below shows where the character George Talboys appears in Lady Audley’s Secret. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Volume 1, Chapter 2
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A young man stands upon a ship, muttering “‘Poor little girl, how pleased she’ll be...how surprised!” He is... (full context)
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George converses with a fellow passenger, a pessimistic governess named Miss Morley. Miss Morley has been... (full context)
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George tells Miss Morley he used to be a cavalryman in the army, when he met... (full context)
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His wife’s misery drove George almost mad with grief and he fled their home, intending to never return. He meant... (full context)
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Motivated by his love for his wife and son, George worked hard and made a fortune prospecting gold. Only a week before he departed Australia... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 4
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Robert is walking around London when he bumps into a man he does not recognize. The stranger reveals himself to be George Talboys, Robert’s old friend... (full context)
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At the coffee shop, Robert and George find no letter from George’s wife. With George disappointed, they sit down in silence. George... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 5
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Shocked and horrified, George passes out in the coffee-house. He wakes up in Robert’s apartment, Fig-tree Court, with Robert... (full context)
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George wants to go immediately to Ventnor, where the newspaper said Helen was buried, but Robert... (full context)
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George and Robert find the cabin of Captain Maldon (Helen’s father), where they learn Maldon is... (full context)
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George asks the landlady if Helen spoke of him in her last days. The landlady said... (full context)
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George and Robert go to see Helen’s grave. George stands by the grave unmoving for a... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 6
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George and Robert go to the beach to find Maldon. Maldon does not seem to recognize... (full context)
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A little boy runs up and starts talking to Maldon. George tells the boy, “I am your father…Will you love me?” The boy says he does... (full context)
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Maldon tells George how after George abandoned the family, they moved to Southampton, where Helen taught piano until... (full context)
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George says Little Georgey should stay with Maldon. George says he will return to Australia as... (full context)
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George asks the landlady more questions about his wife. She says Helen didn’t die in poverty... (full context)
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George discovers that the next ship to Australia does not leave for another month.  In the... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 7
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A year later, George and Robert are back at Fig-tree Court. George still feels intense sorrow over his wife.... (full context)
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Robert suggests he and George go hunting at Audley Court. Robert admits that he does not like hunting but wants... (full context)
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Robert writes to Alicia asking if he and George can visit. Alicia writes back saying that Lady Audley claims that she is too sick... (full context)
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George and Robert go to the decaying village of Audley, three-quarters of a mile away from... (full context)
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George and Robert lounge in the peaceful countryside, but the narrator reminds the reader that people... (full context)
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...though she thinks he’s ultimately too frivolous to really fall in love. Robert returns to George proclaiming that he has in fact, fallen in love with his aunt. George sighs and... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 8
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Alicia is in love with Robert and intends to use George to make him jealous. According to the narrator, she won’t be successful, however, because Robert... (full context)
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George mentions that ever since Helen’s death, he feels as if he is standing on a... (full context)
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Before leaving Essex, George and Robert run into Alicia. Alicia shows them a letter from Lady Audley, asking if... (full context)
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George and Robert miss their train because Robert has a headache, so they decide to visit... (full context)
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Alicia then remembers a secret passageway that leads to Lady Audley’s chambers. Robert and George climb through to Lady Audley’s dressing-room, which is filled with expensive cosmetics, flowers, and jewelry. (full context)
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Robert and George move to a room that contains portraits by famous artists. An unfinished portrait of Lady... (full context)
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As George and Robert leave Audley Court, they pass Lady Audley’s covered carriage. Lady Audley sticks her... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 9
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...and the nearby village that night. Robert spends the storm in his usual laziness, while George seems highly agitated. Robert believes that George is frightened by the lightning, even though George... (full context)
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...Audley has been up all night, claiming she was afraid of lightning and worrying her husband greatly. She seems much more energetic in the morning, laughing about how easily frightened she... (full context)
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George and Robert go fishing. Robert falls asleep next to the stream. While he is asleep,... (full context)
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...and her dog growls at Lady Audley. Lady Audley goes to her chambers and sees George’s glove. She sharply orders Phoebe to take it away, then quickly changes her tone and... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 10
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Robert wakes up to find George missing. When he cannot find George near the stream, he assumes his friend has gone... (full context)
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At Audley Court, a servant tells Robert that George was there at two o’clock but has not been seen since. Robert begins to feel... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 11
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Robert joins Sir Michael, Lady Audley, and Alicia in the drawing room, announcing that George has gone back to London without him. Lady Audley seems surprised by this news. Robert... (full context)
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...Audley says, “It seems almost cruel of Mrs. Talboys to die, and grieve her poor husband so much.” Robert thinks that Alicia is right: Lady Audley is childish. (full context)
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After dinner, Robert chats with Lady Audley, but all he can think about is George. He wishes George was never his friend so that he would not have to care... (full context)
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...Audley, and Alicia, telling them that he will go back to London to look for George. If he does not find him there, he will go to Southampton. If he does... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 12
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Robert returns to Fig-tree Court to find no trace of George. He then goes to Southampton, to Mr. Maldon’s cabin. There he finds Mr. Maldon and... (full context)
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Maldon tells Robert that George stopped by late the previous evening but left after an hour. According to Maldon, George... (full context)
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Robert asks Georgey if he saw George last night. The little boy says he didn’t. Maldon says Georgey... (full context)
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...to Robert that he pawned the watch because he needed the money. He says that George and others have mistreated him. He continues to lament his poverty and then takes Georgey... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 13
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Robert returns to Fig-tree Court to find no letters from George. Exhausted and worried, Robert falls asleep on George’s bed. He dreams that he has to... (full context)
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Robert thinks about the mystery of the telegraph, questioning if Maldon purposely separated Robert from George or harmed George in order to get the 20,000-pound inheritance Robert manages for Georgey. He... (full context)
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Robert goes to Liverpool but does not find George’s name on the passenger list for the one ship heading to Australia. The clerk does... (full context)
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Having concluded that George did not leave England, Robert returns to London and begins making a “Journal of Facts... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 14
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...and Alicia from an ad Robert has put in the newspaper asking for information regarding George, but they soon move on from the subject. Sir Michael scolds Alicia for being disrespectful... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 15
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...after Robert arrives at Audley Court, Lady Audley asks if Robert has heard anything from George. She listens intently while Robert recounts all the evidence he has gathered about George’s disappearance.... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 18
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...He says he is doing so out of curiosity, adding that Luke is “A dangerous mana man in whose power I should not like to be.” Lady Audley asks what she... (full context)
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Lady Audley asks if Robert is referring to George, and he says yes. Lady Audley asks why Robert does not believe that George sailed... (full context)
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Robert says that if he does not hear back from George, he will act upon his fears. Lady Audley asks him what he will do. Robert... (full context)
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Robert tells Lady Audley that if he receives no answer from George, he will conclude that George is dead and will examine the possessions he left, including... (full context)
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...coming back to Audley Court. Robert says he will return to London tomorrow to find George’s letters. He escorts Lady Audley back to her carriage. (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 19
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Robert returns home while contemplating how the mystery of George’s disappearance seems to be circling closer and closer to Robert’s family. He eats his dinner,... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 1
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After dinner, Robert adds more information to his document on George’s case. Then he opens the trunk that belonged to George. There, he finds George’s letters... (full context)
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Robert studies George’s books. In one, he finds a lock of hair, which has a similar color but... (full context)
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...for the worst, and the worst has come.” He knows that he must first place Georgey in a new home. (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 2
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In the trunk, Robert finds a letter from George’s father, Mr. Harcourt Talboys. Robert had written to Harcourt right after George’s disappearance, and Harcourt... (full context)
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On the train to Southampton, Robert feels lonely without George and thinks that he would give up his wealth and privilege if he could have... (full context)
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...him. He sees a child’s funeral procession and thinks about how if anything happened to Georgey, he would be responsible. He finds Georgey at home with a woman of fair complexion,... (full context)
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Mrs. Plowson remains fidgety and seems to know who Robert is. Georgey babbles on about his watch given to him by the pretty lady. Robert asks about... (full context)
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Mrs. Plowson tries to hush Georgey, saying he might be annoying Robert. Georgey rambles on about Mrs. Plowson’s daughter, who was... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 3
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Robert tells Maldon that he intends to take Georgey away. Maldon admits that he always knew either Robert or George would take Georgey away.... (full context)
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Robert confronts Maldon and tells him that George never left for Australia, and that Maldon only repeated what the telegram told him to... (full context)
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...called to discover the fate of his friend. He says that the person responsible for George’s death should flee the country, because Robert will not spare them. (full context)
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Maldon repeats over and over that he does not believe that George is dead. Mrs. Plowson and Georgey reenter the room and Georgey attempts to comfort his... (full context)
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Maldon agrees to let Robert take Georgey away. Robert assures him that he will take Georgey to a good school and will... (full context)
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...a good school in Southampton and meets with the headmaster. He tells the headmaster that Georgey is to have no visitors unless they have a letter with Robert’s authorization. Robert then... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 4
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Harcourt Talboys lives in a “prim, square, redbrick mansion.” Though he is a country squire, there is nothing rustic or hearty about him. No... (full context)
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Harcourt declared his son dead to him from the day of George’s marriage, and George knew better than to try to ask for forgiveness. When Helen suggested... (full context)
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...the table dressed in grey, perfectly ironed clothes. Robert sees no resemblance between Harcourt and George. When Robert sees Harcourt, he understands how such a man could write the harsh letter... (full context)
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A woman also sits across the room from Robert and all he can tell about her is... (full context)
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...but Robert is not easily embarrassed. Robert begins to explain that he is there about George. Clara listens quietly, and Robert suspects that she is “as heartless as her father…though she... (full context)
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Harcourt says that he no longer has a son. Robert says that he believes that George is dead. Harcourt tells him that he must be mistaken, and that this must be... (full context)
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Robert tells Harcourt that he has evidence that George is dead, but he does not want to say it in front of Clara. Harcourt... (full context)
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Robert states that if George had died of a broken heart, Robert would have grieved far less than he grieves... (full context)
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Robert recounts the details of George’s disappearance. Neither Harcourt nor Clara show any emotion during his story, and Robert specifically leaves... (full context)
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...whose expression has still not changed. Robert says that he hopes Harcourt is right about George being alive, but he suspects that Harcourt will one day regret his apathy towards his... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 5
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Robert looks out on the harsh grounds of the Talboys’ mansion and wonders how someone as kind as George could grow up in such a cruel... (full context)
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...sees Clara running toward him. He notices that Clara is “very handsome,” with eyes like George’s. Up close, her face shows every emotion she is feeling. Clara begs him to listen... (full context)
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...to sway her father’s mind. She thought if she waited, her father would eventually forgive George for marrying Helen. (full context)
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Clara begs Robert to tell her the name of the woman he alluded to being involved in George’s disappearance. Robert says he cannot do that until... (full context)
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...in this miserable business of a murder investigation. Clara tells him that he must avenge George’s death. If he doesn’t, she will do it herself. Robert recognizes that Clara’s natural beauty... (full context)
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Clara explains that George was her only companion growing up, and that is why she wants vengeance. She begs... (full context)
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...to continue his investigation, especially since he sees that Clara came to the same conclusion—that George had been murdered—that he did when she heard the evidence. (full context)
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Robert asks if Clara has any old letters from George. Clara says that she will send them to him before she leaves to visit friends... (full context)
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...her when her only companion is dead. Robert remarks again how similar she is to George. Clara leaves, and Robert is filled with a new determination to solve George’s case. (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 6
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...accidental. Consider marriage: for one to be happy in marriage, one must meet the right woman at the right time. He thinks about how he could have easily missed Clara when... (full context)
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...them “bold, brazen, abominable creatures, invented for the annoyance and destruction of their superiors.” Take George for an example. He married a woman and lost his inheritance. He goes to a... (full context)
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...has no interest in, and a package from Clara. The package contains two letters from George. One, written right after his marriage, contains every minute detail of his wife. Robert states... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 9
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...decides that he must first learn what happened to Helen Talboys in the time between George’s abandonment of her and the announcement of her death. (full context)
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Robert writes to Clara asking the name of the town where George met Helen and Mr. Maldon, since George never talked to Robert about Helen after her... (full context)
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Robert asks the landlord how long Helen and Mr. Maldon stayed in Wildernsea after George left. The landlord says that he does not know, but Robert could ask their former... (full context)
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...walks through the town under a gray and cold sky. He sees the pier where George first met Helen. He thinks how the “sweet delusion” of George’s love turned into a... (full context)
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...Helen left abruptly. She says that Helen attempted to support herself through music lessons after George’s abandonment, but Maldon spent all her money. After a fight with her father, Helen left... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 10
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...she does not run away. Robert states that he wants to do his duty to George, but he doesn’t want to punish anyone, so he will give Lady Audley one more... (full context)
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...him about Lady Audley’s secrets. But then he thinks of Clara “beckon[ing] him onwards to her brother ’s unknown grave.” (full context)
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...decides that he must confront Lady Audley at Audley Court. When he arrives at the mansion, however, the lady is away shopping. Robert laments that this obsession with George’s case has... (full context)
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...He listens to an unknown organist playing and thinks about how what torments him about George’s death is all he doesn’t know about it. He thinks about how Lady Audley is... (full context)
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As Clara leaves, she states that she knows Robert will do his duty to George and solve the mystery of his disappearance. Robert says he is “a lazy, good-for-nothing fellow”... (full context)
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...Audley’s childish beauty and golden curls. Clara falls silent, remembering the description of Helen from George’s letter to his sister. (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 11
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...Audley asks Robert where he has been lately. Robert says he was in the town George lived in while married. Lady Audley’s face grows pale, but she keeps smiling. She excuses... (full context)
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Robert says George’s ghost haunts Audley Court. Lady Audley says Robert must be suffering from monomania since he... (full context)
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Robert says Helen faked her own death because she used George’s absence to “win a richer husband.” Lady Audley says this claim is baseless. Robert says... (full context)
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...Maldon created a conspiracy. He states that this is a conspiracy made by a conniving woman, who bet upon the likelihood of her husband’s death and committed a crime in order... (full context)
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Robert says he will expose the truth unless the woman at the center of these secrets decides to run away. Lady Audley says that this... (full context)
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...has two labels from the same box, bearing the names of Miss Graham and Mrs. George Talboys. Lady Audley is silent. They pass the well at the end of the lime-walk. (full context)
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Robert remembers that Lady Audley met George somewhere in this garden on the day he disappeared. Robert says that he knows George... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 12
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Lady Audley argues that Robert must have lived alone for too long and read too many novels. She says people can hide their madness for years before they are overcome by... (full context)
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Lady Audley says Robert accused her of being involved in George’s disappearance. Sir Michael finally agrees that Robert must be mad, and says he will send... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 1
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...Audley feels as if she is running away. She thinks she could run away, like George did, but she has no money and she can’t live in poverty again. She would... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 2
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...would have to be mad herself. Then again, he thinks, Robert has been troubled since George’s disappearance, and Robert showed some unreasonableness in not courting Alicia, even though she has expressed... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 3
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...the process. He says he will not show any mercy to her, only to her husband. (full context)
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Robert says while before he wondered how such a beautiful woman could murder George, he doesn’t wonder now. He knows Lady Audley is capable of any... (full context)
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...Michael in, because Robert has won. She then says that he has conquered a mad woman. She claims managing her insanity has always been a delicate balancing act and when George... (full context)
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Finally, a rich suitor arrived. His name was George Talboys (at this name, Sir Michael starts). George fell in love with Lady Audley and... (full context)
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Lady Audley says that after she and George married, they traveled Europe together. When they came back to live with her father, however,... (full context)
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Lady Audley resented George for leaving her in poverty, having to labor even though George’s father was rich. She... (full context)
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...beauty. Three years had passed by that point, and she heard nothing from her first husband. For all she knew, George was dead or at least separated from her forever, so... (full context)
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Lady Audley then saw an announcement in the paper saying George was coming home. She realized that unless George believed she was dead, he would never... (full context)
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Captain Maldon broke down in tears due to his anxiety over George. Lady Audley sat down to play with her son, who viewed her as a stranger.... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 5
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Lady Audley sleeps peacefully now that her enemy has defeated her. She hasn’t relaxed since George announced his return from Australia shortly after her second marriage, but now the burden of... (full context)
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...transmitted from mother to daughter. He recommends Robert send Lady Audley back to her first husband. Robert then confesses the second half of the story he has been hiding, about George’s... (full context)
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...declares she suffers from “latent insanity,” meaning that, in times of stress, she suffers from mania. He states, however, that Lady Audley is not mad. He adds that she is still... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 6
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...and clothing she hoarded. Robert anxiously awaits the completion of his task. He thinks about George with regret and grief. (full context)
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Lady Audley tells Robert that George’s body lies at the bottom of the well at the end of the lime-walk. She... (full context)
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Lady Audley told George she would convince Sir Michael that George was a madman and a liar. She tried... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 7
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...back to England. He wonders if and how he will tell Sir Michael that the woman his uncle once loved is a murderer. He agonizes over what to do, because if... (full context)
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...a vacation. Sir Michael’s letter offers Robert whatever money needed to deal with a certain woman, provided that Robert never mentions her to him again, a request which relieves Robert. (full context)
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...reality of having to go back to Essex. He dreads telling Clara the truth about George and decides it’s better for her to falsely hope for her brother’s return. (full context)
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...how Clara would react if he told her his life found new purpose in solving George’s case, and he finds an even stronger purpose in his love for her. He thinks... (full context)
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...through. Finally, Robert leaves for the train, although in his fragile mental state he fears George’s ghost invading his empty apartment. The narrator argues one would naturally have such delusions after... (full context)
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Robert takes a carriage to the train station but still feels pursued by George’s ghost. He knows the only way to ease his mind is to give George a... (full context)
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Luke mentions he heard from the Audleys’ servants that Robert was very fond of the man who disappeared at Court. Robert tells him not to speak anymore of George because Lady... (full context)
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...suffering from a fever. Robert thinks about what he will do now that he knows George is dead. He knows if he sees Clara again, he will be compelled to tell... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 8
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...Luke asks his mother if she remembers the 7th of last September (the date of George’s disappearance). Luke’s mother says her memory is poor. Robert says it doesn’t matter because he... (full context)
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...a neighbor’s farm before marrying Phoebe. He asks if she remembers him bringing home a gentleman covered in mud and slime with a broken arm, the man they nursed back to... (full context)
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Robert realizes who Luke is talking about and exclaims, “George Talboys is alive!” Luke asks his mother to fetch a box that contains two pieces... (full context)
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...to visit Phoebe at Audley Court. As he snuck through the lime-walk, he heard a man groaning in the bushes. This man then grabbed Luke by the wrist and asked him... (full context)
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Luke brought the man to his mother’s cottage, and as they bandaged him up, he seemed unresponsive. Luke gave... (full context)
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The man wrote the two letters and left for the train station with Luke. He gave Luke... (full context)
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...house. Luke said this news was sudden, and Phoebe should not keep secrets from the man she wanted to marry. Luke asked if a “tall young gentleman” had come to visit... (full context)
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...Luke she was sitting by a window yesterday when she saw Lady Audley and a gentleman on the lime-walk. She saw what Lady Audley did to the gentleman and could now... (full context)
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...sleeping Luke’s bedside until daybreak. He thinks about how he can now tell Clara that George is alive. Robert leaves and goes to sleep in a hotel. When he wakes up,... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 9
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Clara returns to her home to tell Harcourt that George sailed for Australia on September 9th and will likely return one day to be forgiven... (full context)
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Robert wonders when George will return to England and questions why he didn’t respond to the advertisements Robert put... (full context)
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...springtime, and Robert strolls through the grounds where he met Clara that winter. Though the mansion is still rigid and cold, Robert is delighted to be there because he gets to... (full context)
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Robert dreads being away from Clara and is gloomy on his last day at the mansion. He is happy, though, when he has the chance to talk to Clara alone. They... (full context)
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...Robert tells him what has happened. Robert says their honeymoon trip will be to find George. Harcourt tells Robert that if he brings back his son, he will forgive Robert for... (full context)
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Feeling like a new man with a new life ahead of him, Robert returns to London to arrange for the... (full context)
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George boarded a ship for Australia, but then changed vessels and went to New York. He... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 10
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...now plays with a toddler. Mr. Audley has made a successful career as a barrister. Georgey Talboys is still at school but often comes to the cottage to visit George, who... (full context)
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...in London until Alicia marries Sir Harry, and then he lives on his son-in-law’s estate. George lives happily with Clara and Mr. Audley and may even find someone to ease the... (full context)