Lady Audley’s Secret

Lady Audley’s Secret

by

Mary Elizabeth Braddon

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Lady Audley’s Secret can help.

Lady Audley / Lucy Graham / Helen Maldon Talboys Character Analysis

The titular character of the novel, Lady Audley is the wife of both George Talboysand Sir Michael, the daughter of Lieutenant Maldon, the stepmother of Alicia Audley, and the aunt by marriage of Robert Audley. With her blue eyes, rosy cheeks, and bouncing golden curls, she possesses a childlike beauty that she uses to manipulate and deceive those around her. Having grown up in poverty, Lady Audley is extremely concerned with elevating her social and financial status. The fact that her mother was institutionalized for madness has also haunted Lady Audley throughout her life. Selfish and scheming, she marries George Talboys because he comes from a rich family. When George later abandons her and their child, Georgey, she changes her name to Lucy Graham and begins posing as an unmarried governess until she ensnares an even wealthier husband in the form of Sir Michael. Lady Audley proves willing to go to extremes—including arson and attempted murder—to protect her many secrets. Robert exposes her crimes nevertheless, and she ultimately dies in an asylum. In her audacious social climbing, Lady Audley reflects the fears and prejudices of the Victorian upper class. Despite her wickedness, Lady Audley also represents the impossibility of conforming to Victorian society’s rigid, frequently contradicting expectations of women, and her story reveals the few avenues such women were afforded to control their own fates.

Lady Audley / Lucy Graham / Helen Maldon Talboys Quotes in Lady Audley’s Secret

The Lady Audley’s Secret quotes below are all either spoken by Lady Audley / Lucy Graham / Helen Maldon Talboys or refer to Lady Audley / Lucy Graham / Helen Maldon Talboys . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Oxford University Press edition of Lady Audley’s Secret published in 1987.
Volume 1, Chapter 1 Quotes

“You know that nobody asks you to marry Sir Michael unless you wish. Of course it would be a magnificent match; he has a splendid income, and is one of the most generous of men. Your position would be very high, and you would be enabled to do a great deal of good; but, as I said before, you must be entirely guided by your own feelings.”

Page Number: 13
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 1, Chapter 7 Quotes

Lucy was better loved and more admired than the baronet’s daughter [Alicia]. That very childness had a charm which few could resist. The innocence and candour of an infant beamed in Lady Audley’s fair face, and shone out of her large and liquid blue eyes. The rosy lips, the delicate nose, the profusion of fair ringlets, all contributed to preserve to her beauty the character of extreme youth and freshness.

Related Symbols: Lady Audley’s Golden Curls
Page Number: 50
Explanation and Analysis:

“Do you know, Phoebe, I have heard some people say you and I are alike?”

“I have heard them say so too, my lady…but they must be very stupid to say it, for your ladyship is a beauty, and I’m a poor plain creature.”

“Not at all, Phoebe…you are like me…it is only colour that you want. My hair is pale yellow shot with gold, yours is drab…Why, with a bottle of hair dye, such as we see advertised in the papers, and a pot of rouge, you’d be as good-looking as I any day, Phoebe.”

Related Symbols: Lady Audley’s Golden Curls
Page Number: 54-55
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 1, Chapter 8 Quotes

No one but a pre-Raphaelite would have painted, hair by hair, those feathery masses of ringlets with every glimmer of gold, and every shadow of pale brown. No one but a pre-Raphaelite would have so exaggerated every attribute of that delicate face as to give a lurid lightness to the blonde complexion and a stranger, sinister light to the deep blue eyes. No one but a pre-Raphaelite could have given to that pretty pouting mouth the hard and almost wicked look it had in the portrait.

Related Symbols: Lady Audley’s Golden Curls
Page Number: 65
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 1, Chapter 15 Quotes

“Lady Audley,” answered the young man gravely. “I have never practiced as a barrister…I have shrunk from those responsibilities and duties, as I have from all the fatigues of this troublesome life: but we are sometimes forced in the very position we have most avoided, and I have found myself lately compelled to think of these things. Lady Audley, did you ever study the theory of circumstantial evidence?”

Page Number: 106-107
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 2, Chapter 6 Quotes

“I hate women…They’re bold, brazen, abominable creatures, invented for the annoyance and destruction of their superiors. Look at this business of poor George’s! It’s all woman’s work from one end to the other. He marries a woman, and his father casts him off, penniless and professionless. He hears of the woman’s death and he breaks his heart…He goes to a woman’s house and he is never seen alive again.”

Related Symbols: Audley Court
Page Number: 178
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 2, Chapter 7 Quotes

Lucy Audley looked up from her occupation amongst the fragile china cups, and watched Robert rather anxiously, as he walked softly to his uncle’s room, and back again to the boudoir. She looked very pretty and innocent, seated behind the graceful group of delicate opal china and glittering silver. Surely a pretty woman never looks prettier than when making tea. The most feminine and most domestic of all occupations imparts a magic harmony to her every movement, a witchery to her every glance.

Related Symbols: Audley Court
Page Number: 190
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 2, Chapter 9 Quotes

“I am weary of my life here, and wish, if I can, to find a new one. I go out into the world, dissevered from every link which binds me to the hateful past, to seek another home and another fortune. Forgive me if I have been fretful, capricious, changeable. You should forgive me, for you know why I have been so. You know the secret which is the key to my life.”

Page Number: 213
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 2, Chapter 11 Quotes

“A conspiracy concocted by an artful woman, who had speculated upon the chances of her husband’s death, and had secured a splendid position at the risk of committing a crime…but a foolish woman, who looked at life as a game of chance, in which the best player was likely to hold the winning cards, forgetting that there is a Providence about the pitiful speculators, and that wicked secrets are never permitted to remain long hidden.”

Page Number: 228-229
Explanation and Analysis:

“Mr. Audley may be as you say, merely eccentric; but he has talked to me this evening in a manner that has filled me with absolute terror, and I believe that he is going mad. I shall speak very seriously to Sir Michael this very night…I shall only put him on his guard, my dear Alicia.”

“But he’ll never believe you,” said Miss Audley, “He will laugh at such an idea.”

“No, Alicia; he will believe anything that I tell him.”

Page Number: 238
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 2, Chapter 13 Quotes

Perhaps in that retrospective reverie she recalled the early time in which she had first looked in the glass and discovered that she was beautiful: that fatal early time in which she had first begun to look upon her loveliness as a right divine…Did she remember the day in which that fairy dower of beauty had first taught her to be selfish and cruel?

Page Number: 252
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 3, Chapter 3 Quotes

“I killed him because I AM MAD! because my intellect is a little way upon the wrong side of that narrow boundary-line between sanity and insanity; because when George Talboys goaded me, as you have goaded me; and reproached me, and threatened me; my mind, never properly balanced, utterly lost its balance; and I was mad!

Page Number: 294
Explanation and Analysis:

“The place was indeed select. I had not been there a month before I discovered that even the prettiest girl might wait a long time for a rich husband. I wish to hurry over this part of my life: I dare say I was very despicable. You and your nephew, Sir Michael, have been rich all your lives, and can well afford to despise me; but I knew how far poverty can affect a life, and I looked forward with a sick terror to a life so affected.”

Page Number: 299
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 3, Chapter 5 Quotes

“Because there is no evidence of madness in anything that she has done. She ran away from her home, because her home was not a pleasant one, and she left it in the hope of finding a better. There is no madness in that. She committed the crime of bigamy, because by that crime she obtained fortune and position. There is no madness there. When she found herself in a desperate position, she did not grow desperate. She employed intelligent means, and she carried out a conspiracy which required coolness and deliberation in its execution. There is no madness in that.”

Page Number: 321
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Lady Audley’s Secret LitChart as a printable PDF.
Lady Audley’s Secret PDF

Lady Audley / Lucy Graham / Helen Maldon Talboys Character Timeline in Lady Audley’s Secret

The timeline below shows where the character Lady Audley / Lucy Graham / Helen Maldon Talboys appears in Lady Audley’s Secret. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Volume 1, Chapter 1
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...to stroll up and down the lime-tree walk in the evening with his “pretty young wife.” Afterward the couple relaxes in the drawing-room, where Lady Audley plays music until her husband... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Sir Michael is 56 years old and married Lady Audley, his second wife, a year ago. He had been a widower for 17 years, during which time his... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Lady Audley used to be a governess for a surgeon’s family in a village near Audley Court.... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Lucy Graham, as Lady Audley was then known, seemed completely content with her modest position as... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
As he courted Lucy, Sir Michael didn’t think his status and wealth would influence her attitude towards him because... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Lucy was so used to being adored that she barely noticed Sir Michael’s attention. Mrs. Dawson,... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Sir Michael told Lucy she should only marry him if she loved him. She said he asked for too... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Lucy remarked to herself how this marriage would mean “no more dependence, no more drudgery, no... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 2
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
A young man stands upon a ship, muttering “‘Poor little girl, how pleased she’ll be...how surprised!” He is George Talboys, a handsome 25-year-old man sailing from Sydney to Liverpool.... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...Miss Morley he used to be a cavalryman in the army, when he met his wife. His wife’s father was an alcoholic scammer who used his daughter to ensnare a rich... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
His wife’s misery drove George almost mad with grief and he fled their home, intending to never... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Motivated by his love for his wife and son, George worked hard and made a fortune prospecting gold. Only a week before... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 3
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...Even her dress is a “sickly grey” that matches her skin. Despite her humble appearance, she has “something of the grace and carriage of a gentlewoman.” (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...and sweetheart from childhood. They remark on how much money Lady Audley has now that she’s married Sir Michael and how wonderful it would be if they too had wealth. (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Phoebe remarks on how just three months ago, Lady Audley was a servant like her. Luke tells her not to worry because they could buy... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Since Lady Audley and Sir Michael are away, Luke proposes that he and Phoebe look at all Lady... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...Luke finds a secret drawer containing a baby’s shoe and lock of hair. Phoebe says she prefers this find to the diamond bracelet, and that Luke shall get his public house. (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 4
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...or fortunes. When he receives a letter from Alicia detailing her hatred of her new stepmother, Lady Audley, his only thought concerns whether or not their fighting will ruin his stay... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...he is going to a coffee-house where he expects to find a letter from his wife. Robert accompanies him. George eagerly describes his plans for his wealthy new life with his... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
At the coffee shop, Robert and George find no letter from George’s wife. With George disappointed, they sit down in silence. George picks up a newspaper and discovers... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 5
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...says that George should stay with him while he’s in town. George remembers that his wife is dead and is distraught again. Robert tries to convince him it might be someone... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
George wants to go immediately to Ventnor, where the newspaper said Helen was buried, but Robert convinces him to wait till the next day. They take the... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
George and Robert find the cabin of Captain Maldon (Helen’s father), where they learn Maldon is out with his grandson. In the cabin, they see... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
George asks the landlady if Helen spoke of him in her last days. The landlady said that Helen only cried out... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
George and Robert go to see Helen’s grave. George stands by the grave unmoving for a longtime, and then purchases a headstone... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 6
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...but when Maldon realizes it’s George, he seems frightened. George yells at Maldon for letting his daughter die. Robert suspects Maldon had a history of mistreating his daughter. (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Maldon tells George how after George abandoned the family, they moved to Southampton, where Helen taught piano until her health declined. (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
George asks the landlady more questions about his wife. She says Helen didn’t die in poverty and George wonders where Maldon got the money,... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...asking them to buy a pair of sable fur coats for her “childish and silly” stepmother. (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 7
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...George and Robert are back at Fig-tree Court. George still feels intense sorrow over his wife. He remarks to Robert about how, unlike physical injuries, one cannot tell a person’s emotional... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...does not like hunting but wants to enjoy his uncle’s company and meet his new aunt. George passively agrees to go with him, as he agrees to everything his friend says. (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...if he and George can visit. Alicia writes back saying that Lady Audley claims that she is too sick to have “great rough men” visit. Robert says they can go to... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...Michael has transformed the interior of the mansion with luxurious decorations to compliment his pretty wife. Alicia’s contempt for Lady Audley’s “childishness and frivolity” grows. Everyone else in the neighborhood adores... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...greet them while George hangs back. Alicia wants to meet George, but Lady Audley says she is tired and wants to go home. Sir Michael invites the men to dinner the... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
...Robert about falling in love with Lady Audley just like everyone else does, even though she thinks he’s ultimately too frivolous to really fall in love. Robert returns to George proclaiming... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...Court, Phoebe attends to Lady Audley. Lady Audley is much friendlier with her maid than she is with more upper-class ladies. Lady Audley tells Phoebe that some people say that the... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...telegram states that Mrs. Vincent is very ill and wants to see Lady Audley before she dies. Sir Michael says he will go with her. (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 8
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
George mentions that ever since Helen’s death, he feels as if he is standing on a shore with waves creeping up... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...them a letter from Lady Audley, asking if George and Robert will leave Essex before she gets a chance to properly meet them. Robert remarks on how pretty Lady Audley’s handwriting... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...decide to visit Alicia at Audley Court. Alicia shows them around the house, but when she asks Phoebe if they could see Lady Audley’s rooms, Phoebe says that Lady Audley locked... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Alicia then remembers a secret passageway that leads to Lady Audley ’s chambers. Robert and George climb through to Lady Audley’s dressing-room, which is filled with... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert and George move to a room that contains portraits by famous artists. An unfinished portrait of Lady Audley sits on an easel. George spends a long time looking at... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
As George and Robert leave Audley Court, they pass Lady Audley ’s covered carriage. Lady Audley sticks her head out, unable to tell who they are... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 9
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
At Audley Court, Lady Audley has been up all night, claiming she was afraid of lightning and worrying her husband greatly. She seems much more energetic in... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...and goes to Audley Court. Sir Michael and Alicia are out of the house and Lady Audley is on the lime-walk. George meets a servant at the front door of the house... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...Phoebe to take it away, then quickly changes her tone and tells Phoebe how much she appreciates her. (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 11
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...asks why, Robert states that George has seemed troubled ever since the death of his wife. Lady Audley says she didn’t know a man could form such strong attachments to a... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Lady Audley says, “It seems almost cruel of Mrs. Talboys to die, and grieve her poor husband... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Over dinner, Lady Audley tells Robert about how when she and Sir Michael went to find Mrs. Vincent in London, they could not locate her.... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...dinner, Robert chats with Lady Audley, but all he can think about is George. He wishes George was never his friend so that he would not have to care about another... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Lady Audley plays the piano and Robert turns her sheet music for her. He is mesmerized by her beautiful hands covered in jewelry, but then... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert says goodbye to Sir Michael, Lady Audley , and Alicia, telling them that he will go back to London to look for... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 13
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...to strange places to uncover the secrets of the telegram, and that he goes to Helen Talboys’ grave to find her headstone gone. (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 14
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...move on from the subject. Sir Michael scolds Alicia for being disrespectful to her sensitive stepmother. Alicia says she doesn’t like Lady Audley and is sorry her stepmother has come between... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Lady Audley asks Alicia to promise that, even if she cannot love her, she at least promise not to try to harm her. Alicia says... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Phoebe is just educated enough to hold a conversation with Lady Audley . They mainly talk about the scandalous stories of French novels. Lady Audley mentions a... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...a groom at Audley Court and whom Lady Audley considers to be ugly. Phoebe says she does not love Luke and is only marrying him because she is afraid of refusing... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Lady Audley says Phoebe shouldn’t marry Luke if she’s afraid of him, but if she insists on marrying him, Lady Audley will help them... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Lady Audley meets with Luke and Phoebe and promises them 50 pounds. Luke demands 100 pounds. Lady... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 15
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
...for his passiveness and carelessness. She compares him to another guest, Sir Harry Towers, whom she believes “would go through fire and water for the girl he loves,” unlike Robert. (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
While Lady Audley draws, she and Robert chat about the increase in her fortunes and how she is wealthier now... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
A week after Robert arrives at Audley Court, Lady Audley asks if Robert has heard anything from George. She listens intently while Robert recounts all... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Robert tells Lady Audley that, while he never cared for his profession as a barrister, he now feels compelled... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 16
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...Robert will be staying with him. She implies that Robert’s attentions toward such a young aunt are inappropriate. Sir Michael says that Robert shall leave that night if she is uncomfortable.... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 17
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...and his dogs to keep him company. Robert asks Phoebe to take a letter to Lady Audley for him. (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 18
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...him. Lady Audley comes in looking as youthful and beautiful as ever. She states that she has come to apologize for the silly ideas her husband had about his youthful wife... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...man…a man in whose power I should not like to be.” Lady Audley asks what she has done that would make Robert hate her so much. Robert says that since he... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Lady Audley asks if Robert is referring to George, and he says yes. Lady Audley asks why... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...that if he does not hear back from George, he will act upon his fears. Lady Audley asks him what he will do. Robert admits that he is powerless. George might have... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...that George is dead and will examine the possessions he left, including the letters from Helen Talboys. He doesn’t expect to deduce much from Helen’s letters, since few women write in... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Lady Audley says she assumes that Robert does not accept her apology and won’t be coming back to Audley... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...The driver says that he actually took the lady to the railroad station, so that she could take a train to London. Robert realizes he must go back to London immediately,... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 19
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...wretched, helpless appearance, very different from her usually pleasant, cheerful demeanor. Lady Audley explains that she came to town to settle a large bill she did not want her husband to... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 1
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...that belonged to George. There, he finds George’s letters but cannot find the ones from Helen. He knows they exist because George previously referenced his wife’s letters. In the trunk, he... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...that the book belongs to Miss Bince. The second, written by Miss Bince, states that she is giving the book to her friend, Helen Maldon. The third, written by Helen, states... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 4
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...of George’s marriage, and George knew better than to try to ask for forgiveness. When Helen suggested that George ask his father for help, he said it would be easier to... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...emotion during his story, and Robert specifically leaves out the names of Sir Michael and Lady Audley . He then asks Harcourt if his opinion has changed. Harcourt says no. Robert asks... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 5
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Clara explains that she loved her brother but knew she would not be successful in trying to sway her... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert notes that unlike his pretty cousin or his lovely aunt, Clara is truly beautiful because her appearance is enhanced by her intense passion. Even her... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 6
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...for the annoyance and destruction of their superiors.” Take George for an example. He married a woman and lost his inheritance. He goes to a woman’s house and disappears. Robert also thinks... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...letters from George. One, written right after his marriage, contains every minute detail of his wife. Robert states that George couldn’t have known how this description would later be a clue... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 7
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...over Sir Michael’s house and wonders when his uncle’s life will be inevitably ruined. He wishes that “she” would take his warning and run away. (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...the thought of his inaction allowing Sir Michael to die in the arms of a wicked woman . (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...portraits. Lady Audley’s portrait, with a mocking smile and “tangled glitter of golden hair,” is finished. Robert finds Sir Michael in his bedroom, with Alicia and Lady Audley sitting by his... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...attempting to detect her trickery. He mentions that Lady Audley must be very anxious since she depends on Sir Michael for her safety. Lady Audley says, “Those who strike me must... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Sir Michael awakes and tells Robert that he must get along with his aunt. Robert assures him that he is now immune to her charms. Lady Audley explains that... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...intentions, but Robert says he suspects that Lady Audley is not worthy to be the wife of a noble man such as Sir Michael, and that he hopes to clear her... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Mr. Dawson says that Lucy Graham became his family’s governess in May of 1856, after answering an ad he put... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Robert returns to Lady Audley and Alicia to find them having tea in Lady Audley’s room. Robert observes how innocent... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Lady Audley asks Robert what he talked to Mr. Dawson about. Robert says that it was a... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 8
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
As Robert goes to Mrs. Vincent’s new home, he imagines Sir Michael lying asleep while Lady Audley plays music. He thinks it would be a pleasant image, if he didn’t know that... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...finds Mrs. Vincent in a shabby house filled with broken furniture. Robert asks her if she remembers Lucy Graham, and Mrs. Vincent says yes. Mrs. Vincent knows very little about Lucy’s... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert asks what date Lucy first came to Mrs. Vincent’s school. Mrs. Vincent says that she doesn’t remember, but Tonks... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert asks Mrs. Vincent and Miss Tonks where Lucy came from. Mrs. Vincent says somewhere by the sea, but she’s not sure where. Miss... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Mrs. Vincent admits that she didn’t question Lucy because she was “perfect.” Miss Tonks accuses her of being blind to... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert asks if Lucy left any possession behind. Miss Tonks goes to fetch an empty box that used to... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...to himself that what he has found today is enough to convince Sir Michael that Lady Audley is a “designing and infamous woman.” (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 9
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert contemplates how he now has the evidence to connect Helen Talboys to Lady Audley. He knows he must eventually bring this evidence to Audley Court,... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert writes to Clara asking the name of the town where George met Helen and Mr. Maldon, since George never talked to Robert about Helen after her supposed death.... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert asks the landlord how long Helen and Mr. Maldon stayed in Wildernsea after George left. The landlord says that he does... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...peaceful countryside of Essex to the northern sea shore. As waves roll towards the mansion, Lady Audley emerges from the water, looking like a mermaid, beckoning Sir Michael toward destruction. Dark clouds... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...town under a gray and cold sky. He sees the pier where George first met Helen. He thinks how the “sweet delusion” of George’s love turned into a “fatal infatuation.” He... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Robert goes to Mrs. Barkamb’s house and asks her for the exact date when Helen left Wildernsea. Mrs. Barkamb says Helen left abruptly. She says that Helen attempted to support... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Mrs. Barkamb remembers she has a letter Captain Maldon wrote to her on the day Helen left. She also... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
In her letter to Captain Maldon, Helen writes that she has grown weary of her life in Wildernsea and is leaving to... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...fact that Mr. Maldon’s letter is dated August 16th, 1854 and Miss Tonks said that Lucy Graham arrived at the school on the 17th or 18th of August 1854. Mrs. Barkamb... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 10
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...at Audley Court. Robert laments that Lady Audley seems nervous about his investigation and yet she does not run away. Robert states that he wants to do his duty to George,... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert decides that he must confront Lady Audley at Audley Court. When he arrives at the mansion, however, the lady is away shopping.... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...him about George’s death is all he doesn’t know about it. He thinks about how Lady Audley is now out living the life of a normal upper-class woman, hiding her wicked ways. (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...troubled. He wonders if Clara is suspicious of his attempts to hide Sir Michael and Lady Audley ’s identities. He thinks that he and Clara are unequally matched because of her beauty... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...tell her who those people are until he confirms that the person who lies in Helen’s grave is not Helen. (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...poor young governess. Clara asks for the maiden name of this young governess and what she looks like. The friends tell her about Lady Audley’s childish beauty and golden curls. Clara... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 11
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...was in the town George lived in while married. Lady Audley’s face grows pale, but she keeps smiling. She excuses herself to get dressed for dinner but Robert requests to talk... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Robert and Lady Audley walk along the lime-walk. Lady Audley keeps making excuses to leave. Robert persists, saying he... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Robert says George’s ghost haunts Audley Court. Lady Audley says Robert must be suffering from monomania since he keeps talking... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Robert says Helen faked her own death because she used George’s absence to “win a richer husband.” Lady... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Robert says Helen and Captain Maldon created a conspiracy. He states that this is a conspiracy made by... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...that this woman is also an “infamous assassin.” Lady Audley asks him how he knows Helen is not buried in the grave bearing her name. Robert says that there are only... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...to listen to these crazy ramblings. She argues that George had acted strangely since his wife’s death and Robert has no actual reason to believe Helen isn’t dead. (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert says he has circumstantial evidence. He has the letter Helen wrote to Captain Maldon. He asks Lady Audley if she would like to know whose... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...again. Robert says he will not be fooled by her feminine ploys. He states that Helen deserted her poor father to start a new life. On August 16th 1854, she dropped... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Robert asks her to deny that she is Helen and provide evidence to prove her statement. She says she will not, because... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert envisions Clara’s face, serious and honest in comparison to Lady Audley ’s, and he is filled with determination to save Audley Court from Lady Audley’s evil. (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...search to find his body. Lady Audley throws her arms up and cries out that she will kill Robert first. She says that Robert is driving her to madness. She draws... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert says that since Lady Audley refused to accept his mercy, he will expose her. On their way back to the... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...was also odd. Alicia says Robert’s mother always seems reasonable, except for the fact that she married for love. She says Robert’s father was also a little odd but generally a... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Lady Audley says, “madness is more often transmitted from father to son than from father to daughter,... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 12
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...loves her purely and generously. Sir Michael asks what Lady Audley has been doing since she came home an hour ago. She says that Robert was talking to her but then... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...to cry, worrying Sir Michael. The very real anguish Lady Audley feels overcomes her and she cannot speak. Her agony moves Sir Michael to the point where he would do anything... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Lady Audley argues that Robert must have lived alone for too long and read too many novels.... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...Audley says usually a stranger identifies the first signs of madness in a person. Then she says Sir Michael must not go because he was recently ill. (full context)
Madness Theme Icon
...tragedies that fall upon others. He says Lady Audley doesn’t have to see Robert if she doesn’t want to. (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...Lady Audley makes Sir Michael promise that he will never be influenced against his own wife. She leaves the room, certain that she has turned the tables on Robert. (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 13
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...time outdoors. Sir Michael and Alicia’s relationship suffers because of the animosity between stepdaughter and stepmother. Lonely Alicia cannot even confide in her careless cousin Robert. (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...indoors. She cares for him until bedtime and then returns to her own chambers, where she finds her piano, her drawings, and her embroideries. She sits down to think. If an... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
The narrator argues that Lady Audley cannot take any enjoyment in the art around her because her soul is no longer... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...broods as the fire casts a red light over her face. The narrator speculates that she is remembering her childhood. She could be remembering the first time she looked in the... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Lady Audley twirls her golden hair around her fingers and makes “as if she would have torn them from her head.” But even in her despair, she can’t bring... (full context)
Madness Theme Icon
Lady Audley continues her monologue by stating that she knows the “signs and tokens” of madness, snf therefore Robert is mad. Lady Audley begins... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...are similar in both their looks and their wicked personalities. She confesses to Phoebe that she is deeply troubled, and Phoebe guesses it’s about the secret. (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Phoebe reveals that Robert is at the Castle Inn right now. Lady Audley suspects Robert is interrogating Luke. Phoebe says Luke forced her to come ask Lady Audley... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...Luke in the same place. She knows the drunken Luke will only become cruel if she doesn’t pay. Phoebe says this should be the last payment, since she wants Luke to... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...Audley thinks her life would be better if Luke did die in a fire. Then she admits that it wouldn’t matter, because her most dangerous enemy would still be alive. (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Phoebe hands Lady Audley a letter from Robert. The letter states that if Helen is still alive, Mrs. Barkamb would be able to recognize her. Lady Audley sinks into... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 1
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...feels a brief moment of pity for him. But her pity is mostly selfish, because she knows he will be destroyed if Robert exposes her secrets. Then Lady Audley thinks about... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...fears that Robert will expose her unless some calamity silences him. She stops suddenly. Then she walks to her dressing table and composes herself in the mirror. She tells Phoebe they... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Lady Audley sends Phoebe on ahead and goes to get dresses to go out. An “unnatural colour... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...goes to sneak out through a window in the breakfast-room. In the cheerfully decorated room, she passes Alicia’s drawing supplies. Lady Audley thinks how happy Alicia would be at her stepmother’s... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Outside, Lady Audley feels as if she is running away. She thinks she could run away, like George did, but she has... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Lady Audley walks with an intense courage “born out of her great despair.” She notices a light... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...his speech. With mechanical gestures, Lady Audley enters the room with Phoebe and announces that she has come to settle the debts herself. Luke rudely tells her that she could have... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...pays Luke and Phoebe offers to walk her home. Lady Audley agrees but says that she feels faint and needs water. She then asks Phoebe where Robert’s room is. Phoebe says... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...She finds Room #3 and sees the key in the door. Almost in a trance, she turns the key twice, double locking the door. She goes into Phoebe’s room next door... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...is waiting by the inn’s front door when Lady Audley arrives. Phoebe is alarmed when she realizes Lady Audley doesn’t have the candle, but Lady Audley says the wind blew it... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...is horrified, certain it’s the Castle Inn. She fears for Luke and Robert inside. Then she remembers Lady Audley’s quarrels with Luke and Robert and begs Lady Audley to say that... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 2
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...today. Lady Audley is startled at the casual mention of the name of a man she knows is dead. (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Sir Michael contemplates how his beloved wife told him about Robert’s sanity while she was in a state of agitation. He begins... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
After breakfast, Lady Audley locks herself in her room. From her cabinet, she takes out a bottle labeled “Opium–Poison” but decides she doesn’t need to use it now.... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...in the house is knocking on her door to tell her about the fire. When she awakens, she dresses herself in her best silk, despite her misery. She finds Sir Michael... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...mind, Lady Audley’s appearance is completely composed. She asked Alicia to walk with her because she could not bear to wait inside any longer. She wishes time would stand still. She... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...Night begins to fall, casting shadows over Audley Court. Lady Audley is completely alone until she hears a footstep. She runs to see who it is. She stumbles back and falls... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 3
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...couch in the sitting-room. Robert knows Lady Audley set the fire, not caring who else she killed in the process. He says he will not show any mercy to her, only... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...Luke, but not before Luke was horribly burned. Afterwards, Luke and Phoebe told Robert that Lady Audley had visited the inn that night. (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...he doesn’t wonder now. He knows Lady Audley is capable of any evil deed. Unless she confesses, he will gather witnesses who can reveal her identity and will see her punished... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...a delicate balancing act and when George distressed her, as Robert is distressing her now, she killed him. She asks again for Sir Michael so that she may tell him her... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Robert goes to Sir Michael, telling him that Lady Audley has deceived him and now wishes to make her confession. Sir Michael goes into the library, saying, “‘Tell me that this... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...She grew up without her mother. She lived in a lonely village with a caretaker she hated. She rarely saw her father and learned early on “what it was to be... (full context)
Madness Theme Icon
As a child, Lady Audley kept asking where her mother was, but only heard that she was ill and away. In a moment of anger, her caretaker told her that her... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...Lady Audley was 10 years old, her father returned to take her to school, but she had already felt “the bitterness of poverty.” Sir Michael listens to this story in shock,... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Lady Audley says she told her father she knew about her mother. Captain Maldon loved his wife dearly and... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Lady Audley continues to tell the story of her past. Before she went to school, Captain Maldon took Lady Audley to see her mother. Instead of a... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...keep her mother’s madness a secret, and that secret made her selfish and heartless. As she got older, others told her she was beautiful. Even though she had been cursed with... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
At seventeen, Lady Audley moved in with her now retired father in a remote town. She grew impatient while... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...Talboys (at this name, Sir Michael starts). George fell in love with Lady Audley and she loved him as much as someone like her could. She loved Sir Michael more, however,... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Sir Michael’s romantic image of courting his wife shatters with this story. He remembers the “vague feeling of loss and disappointment which had... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Lady Audley says that after she and George married, they traveled Europe together. When they came back to live with her... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...of violence and despair” indicative of madness. She saw that her father recognized the madness she was feeling. She decided to run away from “this wretched home which [her] slavery supported”... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...advertisement for a teacher in the newspaper. She came up with the fake name of Lucy Graham. When she came to Essex and Sir Michael proposed, she felt she had fulfilled... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Lady Audley says she delighted in her new status and was grateful to Sir Michael. She donated to the... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...announcement in the paper saying George was coming home. She realized that unless George believed she was dead, he would never stop searching for her. Again, Lady Audley felt herself sink... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Captain Maldon broke down in tears due to his anxiety over George. Lady Audley sat down to play with her son, who viewed her as a stranger. When the... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Lady Audley visited Matilda and confirmed she bore a passing resemblance to herself. Lady Audley bribed Mrs. Plowson and then instructed Maldon... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 4
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...must accompany Sir Michael when he leaves Audley Court because he is separated from his wife forever. Robert urges Alicia to never mention Lady Audley’s name to her father. He hopes... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert goes to tell Sir Michael that Alicia will accompany him. At first, Sir Michael wishes to go alone, but then he realizes he should go with Alicia. He regrets allowing... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...the floor. He tells her maid to take the lady up to her room because she is sick. As the maid leads her away, Lady Audley asks if Sir Michael is... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...say goodbye. Robert promises Sir Michael he will do what needs to be done about Lady Audley . (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Alone again, Robert thinks the responsibility to deal with Lady Audley must be God’s punishment for his previously idle life. God must be teaching him that... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 5
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...but now the burden of her secrets is gone. She doesn’t care about the pain she caused others. The next morning, she eats breakfast like a resigned prisoner. She looks around... (full context)
Madness Theme Icon
...the story Lady Audley told last night and Mosgrave listens calmly. Mosgrave asks if Robert wishes to “prove that this lady is mad, and therefore irresponsible for her actions.” Robert says... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Dr. Mosgrave says he will examine Lady Audley but he doesn’t believe she is mad. All her actions came from a desperate situation and she showed intelligence and... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Dr. Mosgrave returns from examining Lady Audley and declares she suffers from “latent insanity,” meaning that, in times of stress, she suffers from mania. He... (full context)
Madness Theme Icon
...letter to his colleague, Monsieur Val, who runs an asylum abroad, asking him to admit Lady Audley for life. Mosgrave says this is the best way to separate Lady Audley from society,... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 6
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...the asylum. He writes to her, telling her to prepare for a journey from which she won’t return. Lady Audley delights in packing up her expensive possessions, knowing wherever she goes... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...Audley sits comfortably in her cabin surrounded by the luxurious tea cups, vases, and clothing she hoarded. Robert anxiously awaits the completion of his task. He thinks about George with regret... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert and Lady Audley travel to an ancient, remote Belgian town. Lady Audley has not spoken during the journey.... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...Audley asks where they are going. Robert answers they are going to a place where she can repent. As they pull up to the asylum, Lady Audley screams. She tells Robert... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Robert says they are in a maison de santé. Lady Audley says that is just the French phrase for a madhouse. The attendant at the asylum... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Robert and Monsieur Val talk privately. Robert says Lady Audley’s name is Mrs. Taylor and she is a distant relative of his who inherited madness from her mother. He says she... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...that her name is Madame Taylor now. Monsieur Val comes in and assures Madame Taylor she shall have every comfort she wants, within reason. Lady Audley hisses at Val to leave... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...been merciful and asks that, in exchange, Lady Audley repent her sins. Lady Audley says she will not, asking, “‘Has my beauty brought me to this?’” (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
...lies at the bottom of the well at the end of the lime-walk. She says she planned on bribing or begging George into letting her keep her new rich life, but... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Lady Audley told George she would convince Sir Michael that George was a madman and a liar. She tried to... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Lady Audley says she is making this confession now because she knows Robert would not put Sir Michael through... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 7
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
...to his apartment and finds letters from Sir Michael, Alicia, and Clara. Alicia’s letter says she called a doctor to examine her unusually quiet father, and the doctor suggested they take... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...ease his mind is to give George a proper burial, even if it means bringing Lady Audley back to England for a criminal trial. Robert thinks the late-night journey is dreary, but... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Through the cottage window, Robert sees Luke’s wife and mother watching over him. Robert waits while Mr. Dawson tends to Luke. He listens... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...better inn. She asks if Lady Audley is gone from Audley Court forever, and if she will be treated well wherever she is now. Robert answers yes. Phoebe says she still... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...man who disappeared at Court. Robert tells him not to speak anymore of George because Lady Audley already told him what happened. Luke asks what exactly Lady Audley said. Robert tells him... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 8
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Robert’s thoughts wander until Luke asks his mother if she remembers the 7th of last September (the date of George’s disappearance). Luke’s mother says her... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...that something awful has happened and he must leave England forever. The second is to Helen from George, saying he forgives her for what she has done and that she will... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...train station with Luke. He gave Luke the letters, telling him to deliver them to Lady Audley and Robert. Then the man left. Luke went to the Sun Inn looking for Robert,... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...tried to sit on the well, Phoebe yelled at him not to. Phoebe told Luke she was feeling off because something had frightened her yesterday. She then said Lady Audley would... (full context)
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Phoebe started crying and told Luke she was sitting by a window yesterday when she saw Lady Audley and a gentleman on... (full context)
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
...wakes up, the landlord tells him Luke has died peacefully. Robert writes a letter to Lady Audley , telling her George is alive. (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 9
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
...about his son. Harcourt laments Robert’s smuggling of Lady Audley out of England, because Harcourt wishes to punish her. (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 10
Appearances and Deception Theme Icon
A year before, Robert Audley received a letter announcing the death of Madame Taylor after a long illness. Sir Harry Towers also comes to visit the cottage, and everyone... (full context)
Poverty and Wealth Theme Icon
Audley Court is empty except for a “grim old housekeeper” in place of Lady Audley . A curtain has been hung over Lady Audley’s portrait. The housekeeper shows visitors through... (full context)