Lady Audley’s Secret

Lady Audley’s Secret

by

Mary Elizabeth Braddon

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Robert Audley is the nephew of Sir Michael, the cousin of Alicia Audley, the friend of George Talboys, and eventual husband of Clara Talboys. At the beginning of the novel, Robert embodies the distracted idleness of the upper class, taking no interest in his career as a barrister and instead spending his time reading French novels and smoking German pipes. He develops a purpose in life, however, when George goes missing. Believing his friend to have been murdered, Robert feels compelled to avenge George by solving his disappearance. His investigation leads him to Clara Talboys, whose passion encourages Robert when he wishes to abandon the increasingly dark investigation. Upon eventually discovering that George’s wife, Helen, is in fact also his uncle Sir Michael’s wife, Lady Audley, Robert attempts to spare his uncle public embarrassment by getting Lady Audley to flee before he must expose her. Though she refuses, this action reveals Robert to be considerate and merciful in his pursuit of justice. Robert is ultimately the one who commits Lady Audley to an asylum abroad. By the end of the novel Robert has matured from a lazy, passive young man into a husband and father, forged by his determination to help his friend. One could interpret Robert as the protagonist of the novel, given his dedication to uncovering the truth of Lady Audley’s secrets. One could also view Robert as an antagonist, however, in that he is a member of the upper class who looks down upon the lower-class Lady Audley for her social climbing. He also at times expresses disdain for women and upholds patriarchal ideals by punishing Lady Audley for violating Victorian expectations of female behavior.

Robert Audley Quotes in Lady Audley’s Secret

The Lady Audley’s Secret quotes below are all either spoken by Robert Audley or refer to Robert Audley. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Women and Power in Victorian England Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Oxford University Press edition of Lady Audley’s Secret published in 1987.
Volume 1, Chapter 4 Quotes

Robert Audley was supposed to be a barrister…He was a handsome, lazy, care-for-nothing fellow, of about seven-and-twenty…Sometimes, when the weather was very hot, and he had exhausted himself with the exertion of smoking his German pipe and reading French novels, he would stroll into the Temple Gardens.

Related Characters: Robert Audley
Page Number: 32-33
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 1, Chapter 15 Quotes

“How charmingly she sits her horse! What a pretty figure, too, and a fine, candid, brown, rosy face; but to fly at a fellow like that, without the least provocation! That’s the consequence of letting a girl follow the hounds…If ever I marry, and have daughters…they shall never go beyond the gates till they are marriageable, when I will take them straight across Fleet Street to St Dunstan’s Church, and deliver them into the hands of their husbands.”

Related Characters: Robert Audley (speaker), Alicia Audley
Page Number: 104
Explanation and Analysis:

“Lady Audley,” answered the young man gravely. “I have never practiced as a barrister…I have shrunk from those responsibilities and duties, as I have from all the fatigues of this troublesome life: but we are sometimes forced in the very position we have most avoided, and I have found myself lately compelled to think of these things. Lady Audley, did you ever study the theory of circumstantial evidence?”

Page Number: 106-107
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 2, Chapter 6 Quotes

“What a wonderful solution to life’s enigma there is in the petticoat government! A man might lie in the sunshine and eat lotuses…if his wife would let him! But she won’t, bless her impulsive heart and active mind! She knows better than that…She drags her husband on to the woolsack, or pushes him into Parliament.”

Related Characters: Robert Audley (speaker)
Page Number: 177
Explanation and Analysis:

“I hate women…They’re bold, brazen, abominable creatures, invented for the annoyance and destruction of their superiors. Look at this business of poor George’s! It’s all woman’s work from one end to the other. He marries a woman, and his father casts him off, penniless and professionless. He hears of the woman’s death and he breaks his heart…He goes to a woman’s house and he is never seen alive again.”

Related Symbols: Audley Court
Page Number: 178
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 2, Chapter 7 Quotes

Lucy Audley looked up from her occupation amongst the fragile china cups, and watched Robert rather anxiously, as he walked softly to his uncle’s room, and back again to the boudoir. She looked very pretty and innocent, seated behind the graceful group of delicate opal china and glittering silver. Surely a pretty woman never looks prettier than when making tea. The most feminine and most domestic of all occupations imparts a magic harmony to her every movement, a witchery to her every glance.

Related Symbols: Audley Court
Page Number: 190
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 2, Chapter 11 Quotes

“A conspiracy concocted by an artful woman, who had speculated upon the chances of her husband’s death, and had secured a splendid position at the risk of committing a crime…but a foolish woman, who looked at life as a game of chance, in which the best player was likely to hold the winning cards, forgetting that there is a Providence about the pitiful speculators, and that wicked secrets are never permitted to remain long hidden.”

Page Number: 228-229
Explanation and Analysis:

“Mr. Audley may be as you say, merely eccentric; but he has talked to me this evening in a manner that has filled me with absolute terror, and I believe that he is going mad. I shall speak very seriously to Sir Michael this very night…I shall only put him on his guard, my dear Alicia.”

“But he’ll never believe you,” said Miss Audley, “He will laugh at such an idea.”

“No, Alicia; he will believe anything that I tell him.”

Page Number: 238
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 3, Chapter 3 Quotes

“I killed him because I AM MAD! because my intellect is a little way upon the wrong side of that narrow boundary-line between sanity and insanity; because when George Talboys goaded me, as you have goaded me; and reproached me, and threatened me; my mind, never properly balanced, utterly lost its balance; and I was mad!

Page Number: 294
Explanation and Analysis:

“The place was indeed select. I had not been there a month before I discovered that even the prettiest girl might wait a long time for a rich husband. I wish to hurry over this part of my life: I dare say I was very despicable. You and your nephew, Sir Michael, have been rich all your lives, and can well afford to despise me; but I knew how far poverty can affect a life, and I looked forward with a sick terror to a life so affected.”

Page Number: 299
Explanation and Analysis:
Volume 3, Chapter 10 Quotes

Two years have passed since the May twilight in which Robert found his old friend; and Mr Audley’s dream of a fairy cottage had been realized…Here amongst the lilies and the rushes on the sloping bank, a brave boy of eight years old plays with a toddling baby…

Mr Audley is a rising man upon the home circuit by this time, and has distinguished himself in the great breach of promise case of Hobbs v. Nobbs.

Related Characters: Robert Audley, George Talboys, Georgey
Page Number: 378
Explanation and Analysis:

I hope no one will take objection to my story because the end of it leaves the good people all happy and at peace. If my experience of life has not been very long, it has at least been manifold; and I can safely subscribe to that which a mighty king and a great philosopher declared, when he said that neither the experience of his youth nor of his age had ever shown him ‘righteous forsaken, nor his seed begging their bread.’

Page Number: 380
Explanation and Analysis:
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Robert Audley Character Timeline in Lady Audley’s Secret

The timeline below shows where the character Robert Audley appears in Lady Audley’s Secret. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Volume 1, Chapter 4
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Robert Audley enjoys all the privileges of being a barrister (lawyer) but has never actually done... (full context)
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Robert is beloved by his uncle Sir Michael and his cousin Alicia. While Alicia, as the... (full context)
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Robert is walking around London when he bumps into a man he does not recognize. The... (full context)
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At the coffee shop, Robert and George find no letter from George’s wife. With George disappointed, they sit down in... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 5
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Shocked and horrified, George passes out in the coffee-house. He wakes up in Robert’s apartment, Fig-tree Court, with Robert sitting by his bedside, smoking a pipe. The room is... (full context)
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George wants to go immediately to Ventnor, where the newspaper said Helen was buried, but Robert convinces him to wait till the next day. They take the train together, discussing how... (full context)
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George and Robert find the cabin of Captain Maldon (Helen’s father), where they learn Maldon is out with... (full context)
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George and Robert go to see Helen’s grave. George stands by the grave unmoving for a longtime, and... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 6
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George and Robert go to the beach to find Maldon. Maldon does not seem to recognize George at... (full context)
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...will return to Australia as soon as possible. Maldon seems eager for him to leave. Robert thinks George should stay. (full context)
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...got the money, but is too weary with grief to ask more questions. He and Robert leave, and George makes Robert the legal guardian of Georgey. (full context)
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...that the next ship to Australia does not leave for another month.  In the meantime, Robert hatches a plan for them to vacation in Russia together. Before leaving, Robert writes to... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 7
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A year later, George and Robert are back at Fig-tree Court. George still feels intense sorrow over his wife. He remarks... (full context)
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Robert suggests he and George go hunting at Audley Court. Robert admits that he does not... (full context)
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Robert writes to Alicia asking if he and George can visit. Alicia writes back saying that... (full context)
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George and Robert go to the decaying village of Audley, three-quarters of a mile away from Audley Court.... (full context)
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George and Robert lounge in the peaceful countryside, but the narrator reminds the reader that people in the... (full context)
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Alicia teases Robert about falling in love with Lady Audley just like everyone else does, even though she... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 8
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Alicia is in love with Robert and intends to use George to make him jealous. According to the narrator, she won’t... (full context)
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...shore with waves creeping up on him, as if his own demise is approaching him. Robert says he has been eating too many heavy suppers and smoking strange cigars. (full context)
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Before leaving Essex, George and Robert run into Alicia. Alicia shows them a letter from Lady Audley, asking if George and... (full context)
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George and Robert miss their train because Robert has a headache, so they decide to visit Alicia at... (full context)
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Alicia then remembers a secret passageway that leads to Lady Audley’s chambers. Robert and George climb through to Lady Audley’s dressing-room, which is filled with expensive cosmetics, flowers,... (full context)
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Robert and George move to a room that contains portraits by famous artists. An unfinished portrait... (full context)
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As George and Robert leave Audley Court, they pass Lady Audley’s covered carriage. Lady Audley sticks her head out,... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 9
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The storm actually does come to Audley Court and the nearby village that night. Robert spends the storm in his usual laziness, while George seems highly agitated. Robert believes that... (full context)
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...and everything except for her husband. She then tells Alicia that she knows George and Robert were in her rooms because George left a glove behind. (full context)
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George and Robert go fishing. Robert falls asleep next to the stream. While he is asleep, George abandons... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 10
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Robert wakes up to find George missing. When he cannot find George near the stream, he... (full context)
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At Audley Court, a servant tells Robert that George was there at two o’clock but has not been seen since. Robert begins... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 11
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Robert joins Sir Michael, Lady Audley, and Alicia in the drawing room, announcing that George has... (full context)
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...seems almost cruel of Mrs. Talboys to die, and grieve her poor husband so much.” Robert thinks that Alicia is right: Lady Audley is childish. (full context)
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Over dinner, Lady Audley tells Robert about how when she and Sir Michael went to find Mrs. Vincent in London, they... (full context)
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After dinner, Robert chats with Lady Audley, but all he can think about is George. He wishes George... (full context)
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Lady Audley plays the piano and Robert turns her sheet music for her. He is mesmerized by her beautiful hands covered in... (full context)
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Robert says goodbye to Sir Michael, Lady Audley, and Alicia, telling them that he will go... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 12
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Robert returns to Fig-tree Court to find no trace of George. He then goes to Southampton,... (full context)
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Maldon tells Robert that George stopped by late the previous evening but left after an hour. According to... (full context)
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Robert asks Georgey if he saw George last night. The little boy says he didn’t. Maldon... (full context)
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Maldon reveals to Robert that he pawned the watch because he needed the money. He says that George and... (full context)
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Left alone in the living room, Robert goes to light his cigar on the fireplace. There, he finds a half-burned scrap of... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 13
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Robert returns to Fig-tree Court to find no letters from George. Exhausted and worried, Robert falls... (full context)
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Robert wakes to knocking at the door of his apartment. He assumes it is his incompetent... (full context)
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Robert thinks about the mystery of the telegraph, questioning if Maldon purposely separated Robert from George... (full context)
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Robert goes to Liverpool but does not find George’s name on the passenger list for the... (full context)
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Having concluded that George did not leave England, Robert returns to London and begins making a “Journal of Facts Connected with the Disappearance of... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 14
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Sir Michael reads aloud to Lady Audley and Alicia from an ad Robert has put in the newspaper asking for information regarding George, but they soon move on... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 15
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Christmastime brings many visitors to Audley Court, mainly young men there for hunting season. Robert is one such visitor. While the other young men are experienced hunters with fine horses... (full context)
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Robert prefers to stay inside chatting with Lady Audley. Alicia, who spends her days hunting, teases... (full context)
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Robert thinks to himself about how Alicia is beautiful and has a troublesome temper. He says... (full context)
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While Lady Audley draws, she and Robert chat about the increase in her fortunes and how she is wealthier now than the... (full context)
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A week after Robert arrives at Audley Court, Lady Audley asks if Robert has heard anything from George. She... (full context)
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Robert tells Lady Audley that, while he never cared for his profession as a barrister, he... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 16
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Christmastime ends and the visitors gradually begin to leave Audley Court. Robert does not leave, however, and Sir Michael says he can stay as long as he... (full context)
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After the conversation, Robert says that by studying Harry’s demeaner, he has learned that Harry proposed to Alicia. He... (full context)
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...he and Sir Michael spoke briefly of Alicia’s complicated situation with her cousin, given that Robert seems not to care about her. (full context)
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Lady Audley asks Sir Michael how long Robert will be staying with him. She implies that Robert’s attentions toward such a young aunt... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 17
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Phoebe shows Robert through the Castle Inn, which has cheaply made, thin plaster walls. It is a dramatic... (full context)
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Phoebe still dresses modestly, unlike what one would expect from a wealthy innkeeper’s wife. Robert thinks that she looks like someone who could keep a secret, and asks her several... (full context)
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Robert hears Luke through the thin walls and decides that the inn-keeper sounds like a fool... (full context)
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Robert remarks on how Luke seems to have powerful secrets on someone, or more likely, Luke’s... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 18
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The next morning, Robert is lounging at the breakfast table when Phoebe announces that Lady Audley has come to... (full context)
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Lady Audley asks Robert why he is staying at the Castle Inn. He says he is doing so out... (full context)
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Lady Audley asks if Robert is referring to George, and he says yes. Lady Audley asks why Robert does not... (full context)
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Robert says that if he does not hear back from George, he will act upon his... (full context)
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Robert tells Lady Audley that if he receives no answer from George, he will conclude that... (full context)
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Lady Audley says she assumes that Robert does not accept her apology and won’t be coming back to Audley Court. Robert says... (full context)
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Robert later runs into Lady Audley’s carriage driver at the inn’s bar. Robert asks the driver... (full context)
Volume 1, Chapter 19
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Robert arrives in London but has to wait a long time to get his luggage. When... (full context)
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Robert returns to his apartment to find everything in order, with no dust on his portmanteau... (full context)
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Robert goes to see the blacksmith, who appears to be having a celebration with his family,... (full context)
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Robert returns home while contemplating how the mystery of George’s disappearance seems to be circling closer... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 1
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After dinner, Robert adds more information to his document on George’s case. Then he opens the trunk that... (full context)
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Robert tries to read his usual French novels and contemplates giving up on his investigation. He... (full context)
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Robert studies George’s books. In one, he finds a lock of hair, which has a similar... (full context)
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Robert closes the book, stating that he “thought it would be so.” He “prepared for the... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 2
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In the trunk, Robert finds a letter from George’s father, Mr. Harcourt Talboys. Robert had written to Harcourt right... (full context)
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On the train to Southampton, Robert feels lonely without George and thinks that he would give up his wealth and privilege... (full context)
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Robert arrives at Southampton and is appalled by the poverty he sees around him. He sees... (full context)
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Mrs. Plowson remains fidgety and seems to know who Robert is. Georgey babbles on about his watch given to him by the pretty lady. Robert... (full context)
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Mrs. Plowson tries to hush Georgey, saying he might be annoying Robert. Georgey rambles on about Mrs. Plowson’s daughter, who was sick. Before he can continue, a... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 3
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Robert tells Maldon that he intends to take Georgey away. Maldon admits that he always knew... (full context)
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Robert confronts Maldon and tells him that George never left for Australia, and that Maldon only... (full context)
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Maldon breaks down sobbing. Because of this, and the incredible poverty surrounding him, Robert takes pity on him. Robert tells him that he wishes he did not have to... (full context)
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...saying that he can have the watch. Mrs. Plowson asks why Maldon is so upset. Robert says it is because George died a year and a half after Helen did. Mrs.... (full context)
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Maldon agrees to let Robert take Georgey away. Robert assures him that he will take Georgey to a good school... (full context)
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Robert finds a good school in Southampton and meets with the headmaster. He tells the headmaster... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 4
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...Harcourt is described as being Roman-like in his strict adherence to justice and punishment, reminding Robert of the historical figure Junius Brutus. (full context)
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Robert travels to Harcourt Talboys’ mansion. Outside, the landscape is sharp and cold, surrounded by snow.... (full context)
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Mr. Harcourt Talboys sits at the table dressed in grey, perfectly ironed clothes. Robert sees no resemblance between Harcourt and George. When Robert sees Harcourt, he understands how such... (full context)
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A woman also sits across the room from Robert and all he can tell about her is that she “was young, and that she... (full context)
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Clara stands up to greet Robert, dropping her needlework. Harcourt tells her to sit down without even looking at her, as... (full context)
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Harcourt says that he no longer has a son. Robert says that he believes that George is dead. Harcourt tells him that he must be... (full context)
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Robert tells Harcourt that he has evidence that George is dead, but he does not want... (full context)
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Robert states that if George had died of a broken heart, Robert would have grieved far... (full context)
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Robert recounts the details of George’s disappearance. Neither Harcourt nor Clara show any emotion during his... (full context)
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Robert looks one last time at Clara, whose expression has still not changed. Robert says that... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 5
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Robert looks out on the harsh grounds of the Talboys’ mansion and wonders how someone as... (full context)
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Robert then sees Clara running toward him. He notices that Clara is “very handsome,” with eyes... (full context)
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Clara begs Robert to tell her the name of the woman he alluded to being involved in George’s... (full context)
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Robert says Clara surely cannot be asking him to continue on in this miserable business of... (full context)
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Robert notes that unlike his pretty cousin or his lovely aunt, Clara is truly beautiful because... (full context)
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Robert asks if Clara has any old letters from George. Clara says that she will send... (full context)
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Robert tells Clara she should go inside because of the cold. She says cold is nothing... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 6
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Robert walks alone and contemplates the nature of happiness. He remarks on how little time one... (full context)
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Robert thinks how life is often cruelly indifferent to the plight of humans. He wonders why... (full context)
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Robert admits that he submits completely to Clara’s will. He expands his musings by stating that... (full context)
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Robert then states that he hates women, calling them “bold, brazen, abominable creatures, invented for the... (full context)
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Robert returns to Fig-tree Court to find his delivery of French novels, which he has no... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 7
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In the dreariness of winter, Robert wanders around London, lonely and disinterested in the decadent hobbies of his barrister friends. He... (full context)
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Alicia writes to Robert telling him Sir Michael is sick (though not deathly ill) and would like to see... (full context)
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Robert rushes to Audley Court. He notices that the bare trees surrounding Audley Court look like... (full context)
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At Audley Court, Robert walks through the room with the portraits. Lady Audley’s portrait, with a mocking smile and... (full context)
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 Alicia and Lady Audley greet Robert while Sir Michael is still asleep. Robert studies Lady Audley’s face, attempting to detect her... (full context)
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Sir Michael awakes and tells Robert that he must get along with his aunt. Robert assures him that he is now... (full context)
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Mr. Dawson arrives and examines Sir Michael. As he leaves, Robert follows him out and asks him about Lady Audley’s past. Mr. Dawson is suspicious of... (full context)
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...a strong recommendation from Mrs. Vincent, a proprietress of a school in London. He gives Robert the address of Mrs. Vincent. Robert tells Mr. Dawson that he still has three years... (full context)
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Robert returns to Lady Audley and Alicia to find them having tea in Lady Audley’s room.... (full context)
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Robert mentions to Alicia that she doesn’t look well. She says it doesn’t matter if she... (full context)
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Lady Audley asks Robert what he talked to Mr. Dawson about. Robert says that it was a legal matter... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 8
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Robert returns to London and goes to Mrs. Vincent’s address. He finds her neighborhood under construction... (full context)
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As Robert goes to Mrs. Vincent’s new home, he imagines Sir Michael lying asleep while Lady Audley... (full context)
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Robert finds Mrs. Vincent in a shabby house filled with broken furniture. Robert asks her if... (full context)
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Robert asks what date Lucy first came to Mrs. Vincent’s school. Mrs. Vincent says that she... (full context)
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Robert asks Mrs. Vincent and Miss Tonks where Lucy came from. Mrs. Vincent says somewhere by... (full context)
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...to the faults of her favorites and that Lucy was only “ornamental” to the school. Robert asks Miss Tonks if she has any more information. She doesn’t, other than that Lucy... (full context)
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Robert asks if Lucy left any possession behind. Miss Tonks goes to fetch an empty box... (full context)
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Robert bids Miss Tonks and Mrs. Vincent goodbye and takes the two labels with him. He... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 9
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Robert contemplates how he now has the evidence to connect Helen Talboys to Lady Audley. He... (full context)
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Robert writes to Clara asking the name of the town where George met Helen and Mr.... (full context)
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...train ride to Wildernsea is dismal and lonely, made even worse by the purpose of Robert’s journey. When he arrives that night, he is the only one at the station. Robert... (full context)
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Robert asks the landlord how long Helen and Mr. Maldon stayed in Wildernsea after George left.... (full context)
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That night, Robert dreams of Audley Court being transported from the peaceful countryside of Essex to the northern... (full context)
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The next day, Robert walks through the town under a gray and cold sky. He sees the pier where... (full context)
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Robert goes to Mrs. Barkamb’s house and asks her for the exact date when Helen left... (full context)
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...like that. Helen writes, “You know the secret which is the key to my life.” Robert recognizes the handwriting of this letter. (full context)
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Robert connects the fact that Mr. Maldon’s letter is dated August 16th, 1854 and Miss Tonks... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 10
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Robert receives a letter Alicia stating that Sir Michael is feeling better and both he and... (full context)
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Robert is again overcome with worry about Sir Michael’s ruin, fearing that he himself will be... (full context)
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Robert decides that he must confront Lady Audley at Audley Court. When he arrives at the... (full context)
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Robert strolls to a nearby, lonely church. He listens to an unknown organist playing and thinks... (full context)
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When Robert goes to greet the organist, he discovers that Clara is the one playing the organ.... (full context)
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Before Clara can discover more, Robert says goodbye. Clara reminds him he promised to write her if he discovers any new... (full context)
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As Clara leaves, she states that she knows Robert will do his duty to George and solve the mystery of his disappearance. Robert says... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 11
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Back at Audley Court, Robert runs into Lady Audley and Alicia. Robert finds Alicia more annoying than usual. Lady Audley... (full context)
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Robert and Lady Audley walk along the lime-walk. Lady Audley keeps making excuses to leave. Robert... (full context)
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Robert says George’s ghost haunts Audley Court. Lady Audley says Robert must be suffering from monomania... (full context)
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Robert says Helen faked her own death because she used George’s absence to “win a richer... (full context)
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Robert says Helen and Captain Maldon created a conspiracy. He states that this is a conspiracy... (full context)
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Robert says whoever did this is also a foolish woman, since “Providence” brings down the wicked.... (full context)
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Robert says he will uncover the truth. He will not be fooled by “womanly trickery.” He... (full context)
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Robert says he will expose the truth unless the woman at the center of these secrets... (full context)
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Robert says he has circumstantial evidence. He has the letter Helen wrote to Captain Maldon. He... (full context)
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Lady Audley tries to leave again. Robert says he will not be fooled by her feminine ploys. He states that Helen deserted... (full context)
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Robert asks her to deny that she is Helen and provide evidence to prove her statement.... (full context)
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Robert envisions Clara’s face, serious and honest in comparison to Lady Audley’s, and he is filled... (full context)
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Robert remembers that Lady Audley met George somewhere in this garden on the day he disappeared.... (full context)
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Robert says that since Lady Audley refused to accept his mercy, he will expose her. On... (full context)
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After Robert leaves, Alicia remarks how strange her cousin has been acting. Lady Audley remarks that he... (full context)
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...daughter, and from mother to daughter than from mother to son.” She tells Alicia that Robert is mad. Alicia doesn’t believe her, but Lady Audley says Sir Michael will. (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 12
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...Lady Audley has been doing since she came home an hour ago. She says that Robert was talking to her but then he suddenly ran off. Sir Michael remarks that Robert... (full context)
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...the point where he would do anything for her. With much difficulty, Lady Audley says Robert talked to her about horrible subjects and must have inherited madness. Sir Michael says Robert’s... (full context)
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Lady Audley argues that Robert must have lived alone for too long and read too many novels. She says people... (full context)
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...is shocked and says he will go to Mount Stanning to determine whether or not Robert is mad. Lady Audley says usually a stranger identifies the first signs of madness in... (full context)
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Sir Michael says Robert will come visit tomorrow. He adds that he really doesn’t believe that Robert is mad.... (full context)
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Lady Audley says Robert accused her of being involved in George’s disappearance. Sir Michael finally agrees that Robert must... (full context)
Volume 2, Chapter 13
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...the animosity between stepdaughter and stepmother. Lonely Alicia cannot even confide in her careless cousin Robert. (full context)
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...her monologue by stating that she knows the “signs and tokens” of madness, snf therefore Robert is mad. Lady Audley begins to wonder if anything will stop Robert but death. She... (full context)
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Phoebe reveals that Robert is at the Castle Inn right now. Lady Audley suspects Robert is interrogating Luke. Phoebe... (full context)
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Lady Audley contemplates the situation, with Robert and Luke in the same place. She knows the drunken Luke will only become cruel... (full context)
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Phoebe hands Lady Audley a letter from Robert. The letter states that if Helen is still alive, Mrs. Barkamb would be able to... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 1
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...him. But her pity is mostly selfish, because she knows he will be destroyed if Robert exposes her secrets. Then Lady Audley thinks about “her lovely face, her bewitching manner, her... (full context)
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Despite her confidence in Sir Michael, Lady Audley still fears that Robert will expose her unless some calamity silences him. She stops suddenly. Then she walks to... (full context)
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...one window of the Castle Inn, where Luke must be still awake. Lady Audley assumes Robert is asleep in one of the unlit rooms. Lady Audley confirms with Phoebe that Robert... (full context)
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...agrees but says that she feels faint and needs water. She then asks Phoebe where Robert’s room is. Phoebe says he is in Room #3, which is next to their own.... (full context)
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...the distance. Phoebe is horrified, certain it’s the Castle Inn. She fears for Luke and Robert inside. Then she remembers Lady Audley’s quarrels with Luke and Robert and begs Lady Audley... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 2
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...a pale face and dark-circles beneath her eyes. At the breakfast table, Alicia wonders if Robert will come visit today. Lady Audley is startled at the casual mention of the name... (full context)
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Alicia rambles on about Robert’s poor manners. Sir Michael listens thoughtfully, understanding that Alicia insults Robert because she loves him.... (full context)
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Sir Michael contemplates how his beloved wife told him about Robert’s sanity while she was in a state of agitation. He begins to think he has... (full context)
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The more Sir Michael thinks, the more he becomes convinced Robert must be mad not to love the pretty, affectionate Alicia, when so many suitors seem... (full context)
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Robert does not love Alicia. He appreciates her pretty looks and her affection for him, but... (full context)
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...agony would be over. She continues wishing someone would come and tell Sir Michael that Robert is dead. (full context)
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Alicia imagines catching a cold on the walk and Robert coming to take care of her in her dying state. Alicia leaves Lady Audley to... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 3
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Robert asks to speak to Lady Audley alone, and they go to the library. Robert tells... (full context)
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No one died in the fire. Robert slept lightly because of his worries. He woke up in time to save Luke, but... (full context)
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Robert says while before he wondered how such a beautiful woman could murder George, he doesn’t... (full context)
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Lady Audley tells Robert to bring Sir Michael in, because Robert has won. She then says that he has... (full context)
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Robert goes to Sir Michael, telling him that Lady Audley has deceived him and now wishes... (full context)
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...in a remote town. She grew impatient while waiting for a rich husband. She says Robert and Sir Michael have been rich their whole lives, so they cannot know how poverty... (full context)
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Sir Michael says he cannot listen anymore. He tells Robert to arrange to provide for the woman he once loved. He cannot bear to say... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 4
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Robert worries about Sir Michael’s quiet devastation. He fears Sir Michael in his old age might... (full context)
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Robert tells Alicia he loves her as a brother, not as Sir Harry loves her. Alicia... (full context)
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Robert goes to tell Sir Michael that Alicia will accompany him. At first, Sir Michael wishes... (full context)
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Robert returns to the library to find Lady Audley still lying on the floor. He tells... (full context)
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Robert sits down in front of the fireplace, wondering at how such a pleasant place as... (full context)
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Alone again, Robert thinks the responsibility to deal with Lady Audley must be God’s punishment for his previously... (full context)
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...what has happened based on the few scraps of gossip they could gather. They suspect Robert told Sir Michael of the death of a relative or a loss of family funds.... (full context)
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Robert sits exhausted in front of the fireplace, remembering that just that morning he woke up... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 5
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Dr. Mosgrave arrives at Audley Court. Robert ensures the doctor’s findings will remain confidential and that the doctor’s specialty is treating insanity.... (full context)
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...that Lady Audley is not mad. He adds that she is still dangerous, and that Robert wouldn’t succeed in a criminal case because there’s no evidence that George is dead. Robert... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 6
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Robert contemplates how he has become the judge and now the “gaoler” for Lady Audley. His... (full context)
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Robert and Lady Audley take a steamship to the Continent. Lady Audley sits comfortably in her... (full context)
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Robert and Lady Audley travel to an ancient, remote Belgian town. Lady Audley has not spoken... (full context)
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Finally, Lady Audley asks where they are going. Robert answers they are going to a place where she can repent. As they pull up... (full context)
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Robert says they are in a maison de santé. Lady Audley says that is just the... (full context)
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Robert and Monsieur Val talk privately. Robert says Lady Audley’s name is Mrs. Taylor and she... (full context)
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Robert returns to Lady Audley and explains that her name is Madame Taylor now. Monsieur Val... (full context)
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Lady Audley tells Robert that he has brought her to her “grave” and used his “power basely and cruelly.”... (full context)
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Lady Audley tells Robert that George’s body lies at the bottom of the well at the end of the... (full context)
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Lady Audley says she is making this confession now because she knows Robert would not put Sir Michael through a criminal trial, and no trial could sentence her... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 7
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Bewildered, Robert travels back to England. He wonders if and how he will tell Sir Michael that... (full context)
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Robert arrives in London and goes to the hotel Sir Michael and Alicia were staying at,... (full context)
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...states that Luke is in failing health and both he and Phoebe wish to see Robert before Luke dies. Robert smokes his pipe and has pleasant dreams of Clara, but when... (full context)
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While he waits for the next train to Essex, Robert contemplates how much his life has changed in a year and a half. He used... (full context)
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Robert paces back and forth. He has no interest in smoking alone and feels alienated from... (full context)
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Robert takes a carriage to the train station but still feels pursued by George’s ghost. He... (full context)
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Robert arrives in Mount Stanning, where the wind blows on the charred remains of the Castle... (full context)
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Through the cottage window, Robert sees Luke’s wife and mother watching over him. Robert waits while Mr. Dawson tends to... (full context)
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...made the room around the dying man neat and orderly. Phoebe tries to speak to Robert alone but Luke objects, saying he wants to undo any trouble he’s caused. (full context)
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Phoebe takes Robert aside and says Luke doesn’t remember anything of the night of the fire, but resents... (full context)
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Luke demands to speak to Robert alone. Phoebe agrees, but tells him not to say anything against “those that have been... (full context)
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Luke mentions he heard from the Audleys’ servants that Robert was very fond of the man who disappeared at Court. Robert tells him not to... (full context)
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Luke pauses, clearly suffering from a fever. Robert thinks about what he will do now that he knows George is dead. He knows... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 8
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Robert’s thoughts wander until Luke asks his mother if she remembers the 7th of last September... (full context)
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Robert realizes who Luke is talking about and exclaims, “George Talboys is alive!” Luke asks his... (full context)
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...Luke. He gave Luke the letters, telling him to deliver them to Lady Audley and Robert. Then the man left. Luke went to the Sun Inn looking for Robert, but Robert... (full context)
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Robert sits by sleeping Luke’s bedside until daybreak. He thinks about how he can now tell... (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 9
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Robert wonders when George will return to England and questions why he didn’t respond to the... (full context)
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It is now springtime, and Robert strolls through the grounds where he met Clara that winter. Though the mansion is still... (full context)
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Other friends come to visit the Talboys and Robert feels jealous of the young men who undoubtedly also fall in love with Clara. While... (full context)
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Robert asks Clara if she thinks he will never tire of his privileged hobbies. He is... (full context)
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Robert cannot summon the courage to express his love to Clara, so after five weeks at... (full context)
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Robert dreads being away from Clara and is gloomy on his last day at the mansion.... (full context)
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Clara says she has no right to allow Robert to make such a sacrifice for her. Robert says she does have the right because... (full context)
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Later, Harcourt comes into the room and finds Robert sitting alone. Robert tells him what has happened. Robert says their honeymoon trip will be... (full context)
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Feeling like a new man with a new life ahead of him, Robert returns to London to arrange for the trip to Australia. When he returns to Fig-tree... (full context)
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...changed vessels and went to New York. He lived in exile there but longed for Robert, his friend who guided him through the darkest period of his life. (full context)
Volume 3, Chapter 10
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Two years pass. Mr. Audley has built his rustic cottage upon a river, on whose banks an eight-year-old boy now... (full context)
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A year before, Robert Audley received a letter announcing the death of Madame Taylor after a long illness. Sir... (full context)
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...Mr. Audley and may even find someone to ease the pain of his first marriage. Robert has given away his novels. (full context)