Lady Macbeth

Lady Macbeth

by

Susan King

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People in England of German descent. Often used in contrast to the inhabitants of Scotland, who are ethnically Celtic.

Saxon Quotes in Lady Macbeth

The Lady Macbeth quotes below are all either spoken by Saxon or refer to Saxon. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
History, Memory, and Storytelling  Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Three Rivers Press edition of Lady Macbeth published in 2008.
Chapter 9  Quotes

At one point, King Malcolm himself carried his great-grandson and held him out to King Cnut. The prince, at two years old a sturdy handful, set up a lusty caterwauling, so that both men looked annoyed. Still, the message was clear: young Malcolm mac Duncan of Scotland had made a symbolic homage to the ruler of England.

And it was clear to those watching that in making his great-grandson pledge to England, old Malcolm was declaring that his line, grandson to son, would be kings hereafter. […]

The child’s mother, Lady Sybilla, stepped forward to take her boy from her father-by-law. I was among the retinue of women who walked with her, and she turned to give the squalling child to me. He struggled to get down, and I set him on his feet, taking his hand. He pulled me along rather like a ram dragging its shepherd. Others were amused, but I felt a strange sense, like a weight on my shoulders, on my soul.

And then, with a shudder, I knew it for an omen of the future—myself, and all of us gathered that day were linked to this moment as if by the tug of a heavy chain.

Page Number: 79
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Lady Macbeth LitChart as a printable PDF.
Lady Macbeth PDF

Saxon Term Timeline in Lady Macbeth

The timeline below shows where the term Saxon appears in Lady Macbeth. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 9 
Gender Roles  Theme Icon
Fate, Family, and Ambition  Theme Icon
...and Bodhe ride to witness a meeting of kings on the border between Lothian and Saxon Northumbria. King Malcolm of Scotland has planned to meet the Saxon King Cnut and wants... (full context)
Chapter 20 
History, Memory, and Storytelling  Theme Icon
Magic, Tradition, and Religion  Theme Icon
...life is less brutal than it was. Gruadh worries Scotland will become too Roman, or Saxon, or Viking, and hopes they remain Celts.   (full context)
Chapter 22 
Magic, Tradition, and Religion  Theme Icon
Fate, Family, and Ambition  Theme Icon
...at Dunsinnan. Gruadh reflects on Lady Sybilla, who is “effectively queen,” although because she is Saxon can never be a fully Celtic queen. Gruadh wonders if she will also have the... (full context)
Magic, Tradition, and Religion  Theme Icon
Fate, Family, and Ambition  Theme Icon
Macbeth anticipates that Duncan will dispute the southern Saxon border, although King Malcolm had hashed it out years earlier with King Cnut. Gruadh complains... (full context)
Chapter 25 
Fate, Family, and Ambition  Theme Icon
...between Duncan and Macbeth. Duncan wants Macbeth to raise thousands of men to attack the Saxons. Macbeth refuses, even though without his help Duncan will not have enough soldiers. Two weeks... (full context)
Chapter 29 
Magic, Tradition, and Religion  Theme Icon
Fate, Family, and Ambition  Theme Icon
Violence, Justice, and Revenge  Theme Icon
...Gruadh discusses politics with her friends and guards. Angus believes Malcolm mac Duncan has the Saxon king Edward’s support, and has spent his whole life nursing resentment for Macbeth. (full context)
Magic, Tradition, and Religion  Theme Icon
Fate, Family, and Ambition  Theme Icon
Violence, Justice, and Revenge  Theme Icon
...as a child. He tells her they have since made a truce and warns her Saxon ships approach, intending to sink Macbeth’s ship. Malcolm mac Duncan knows if he “should sink... (full context)
Gender Roles  Theme Icon
Fate, Family, and Ambition  Theme Icon
Violence, Justice, and Revenge  Theme Icon
...the shoreline. Gruadh then watches Macbeth’s merchant vessel slowly make its way towards shore, and Saxon ships approach from the south, hoping to attack and trap Macbeth. Gruadh orders her troops... (full context)
Chapter 31
Magic, Tradition, and Religion  Theme Icon
Fate, Family, and Ambition  Theme Icon
...worked to blend Celtic traditions with the “the ways of the Church and even the Saxons.” Gruadh protested that giving up any Celtic traditions was threatening Scotland’s soul, but Macbeth argued... (full context)