Lady Windermere’s Fan

by

Oscar Wilde

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Augustus (nicknamed Tuppy) is an older gentleman and the brother of the Duchess of Berwick. It’s implied that he’s likeable but buffoonish; he’s been married and divorced multiple times and quickly falls in love with Mrs. Erlynne, despite the fact that she’s clearly manipulating him in order to gain social status by marrying him. Though he is initially preoccupied with Mrs. Erlynne’s lack of family relations, he is reassured by Lady Windermere’s acceptance of her, and he proposes to Mrs. Erlynne at the party. The other men tease Augustus for his naivety, but he eagerly pursues Mrs. Erlynne regardless. Augustus is dismayed to discover Mrs. Erlynne hiding in Lord Darlington’s rooms, but he readily accepts her explanation, and Augusts and Mrs. Erlynne get engaged at the play’s conclusion.

Augustus Quotes in Lady Windermere’s Fan

The Lady Windermere’s Fan quotes below are all either spoken by Augustus or refer to Augustus. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Oxford University Press edition of Lady Windermere’s Fan published in 2008.
Act II Quotes

LORD AUGUSTUS: (coming up to Lord Windermere) Want to speak to you particularly, dear boy. I’m worn to a shadow. Know I don’t look it. None of us men do look what we really are. Demmed good thing, too. What I want to know is this. Who is she? Where does she come from? Why hasn’t she got any demmed relations? Demmed nuisance, relations! But they make one so demmed respectable.

Related Characters: Augustus (speaker), Lord Windermere, Mrs. Erlynne
Page Number: 23
Explanation and Analysis:

MRS. ERLYNNE: (laughing) Then we will talk of it on the terrace. Even business should have a picturesque background. Should it not, Windermere? With a proper background women can do anything.

Related Characters: Mrs. Erlynne (speaker), Lord Windermere, Augustus
Page Number: 32
Explanation and Analysis:
Act III Quotes

LORD AUGUSTUS: You want to make her out a wicked woman. She is not!

CECIL GRAHAM: Oh! Wicked women bother one. Good women bore one. That is the only difference between them.

LORD AUGUSTUS: (puffing a cigar) Mrs. Erlynne has a future before her.

DUMBY: Mrs. Erlynne has a past before her.

LORD AUGUSTUS: I prefer women with a past. They’re always so demmed amusing to talk to.

Related Characters: Augustus (speaker), Cecil Graham (speaker), Dumby (speaker), Mrs. Erlynne
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:

CECIL GRAHAM: Now, my dear Tuppy, don’t be led astray into the paths of virtue. Reformed, you would be perfectly tedious. That is the worst of women. They always want one to be good. And if we are good, when they meet us, they don’t love us at all. They like to find us quite irretrievably bad, and to leave us quite unattractively good.

Related Characters: Cecil Graham (speaker), Mrs. Erlynne, Augustus
Page Number: 43-44
Explanation and Analysis:

CECIL GRAHAM: That is a great error. Experience is a question of instinct about life. I have got it. Tuppy hasn’t. Experience is the name Tuppy gives to his mistakes. That is all. (Lord Augustus looks around indignantly)

DUMBY: Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes.

CECIL GRAHAM: (standing with his back to the fireplace) One shouldn’t commit any.

Related Characters: Cecil Graham (speaker), Dumby (speaker), Augustus
Page Number: 45
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Lady Windermere’s Fan LitChart as a printable PDF.
Lady Windermere’s Fan PDF

Augustus Character Timeline in Lady Windermere’s Fan

The timeline below shows where the character Augustus appears in Lady Windermere’s Fan. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act I
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
Language and Truth Theme Icon
Gender, Performance, and Femininity Theme Icon
...scandalous woman named Mrs. Erlynne. The Duchess claims that many men (including her own brother Augustus) are enamored of Mrs. Erlynne, and that the Duchess’s own nieces have seen Lord Windermere... (full context)
Act II
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
Gender, Performance, and Femininity Theme Icon
Family and Friendship Theme Icon
Augustus, the Duchess’s brother, arrives and takes Lord Windermere aside to discuss Mrs. Erlynne. Augustus is... (full context)
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
Gender, Performance, and Femininity Theme Icon
Family and Friendship Theme Icon
Cecil Graham enters, saying that he’s exhausted from having dinner with his family. He teases Augustus about his past divorces and the two join the party. Lady Plymdale attempts to get... (full context)
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
Gender, Performance, and Femininity Theme Icon
...women at the party, whom she finds more intimidating than the men. She turns to Augustus and draws him into flirtatious conversation. (full context)
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
Gender, Performance, and Femininity Theme Icon
Mrs. Erlynne dances with Lord Windermere in order to make Augustus jealous, while telling Augustus that she would much rather dance with him. In passing, she... (full context)
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
Language and Truth Theme Icon
...Windermere and Mrs. Erlynne talk together, with Mrs. Erlynne happily announcing her intention to accept Augustus’s proposal. She reminds Lord Windermere that he has said he’ll give her money with which... (full context)
Gender, Performance, and Femininity Theme Icon
Family and Friendship Theme Icon
...he leaves, she exclaims that she must find a way to save her child. When Augustus enters, carrying a bouquet, Mrs. Erlynne sternly tells him that he must take Lord Windermere... (full context)
Act III
Family and Friendship Theme Icon
...a curtain, which she does. It becomes clear that one of the voices belongs to Augustus, at which point Mrs. Erlynne also hides in another room. Lord Darlington, Lord Windermere, Augustus,... (full context)
Language and Truth Theme Icon
Family and Friendship Theme Icon
...early. Lord Windermere thanks Lord Darlington for his hospitality but says he can’t stay long. Augustus replies that Windermere must stay because there’s still so much to talk about. Cecil Graham... (full context)
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
...sit at his desk, saying he needs to write letters before leaving in the morning. Augustus calls Mrs. Erlynne clever and expresses his happiness that she truly understands what a fool... (full context)
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
Language and Truth Theme Icon
Gender, Performance, and Femininity Theme Icon
...“gossip” and not “scandal” because scandal involves morality, which makes it tedious. Lord Windermere and Augustus both decline to play cards, which makes Dumby comment that marriage “ruins a man.” For... (full context)
Gender, Performance, and Femininity Theme Icon
Family and Friendship Theme Icon
...is faithful to the woman he loves. When he confirms that he is, Cecil takes Augustus aside and points out the fan. The two men laugh over the contrast between Darlington’s... (full context)
Act IV
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
Gender, Performance, and Femininity Theme Icon
Parker announces that the carriage has arrived and that Augustus has come to call. Augustus greets Mrs. Erlynne coldly, but she asks him to see... (full context)
Morality and Ambiguity Theme Icon
Gender, Performance, and Femininity Theme Icon
Augustus reenters and says that Mrs. Erlynne explained everything, which startles both Lord Windermere and Lady... (full context)