Little Women

Little Women

Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. March, sister of Jo, Beth, and Amy, and (eventually) Mr. Brooke’s wife. Meg is considered the beauty of the March clan – she is gentle, plump, delicate, and rosy. Fond of finery, Meg’s greatest challenge is to humble herself to a life that isn’t as grand as she might wish. Meg is sixteen when the story begins.

Margaret "Meg" March Quotes in Little Women

The Little Women quotes below are all either spoken by Margaret "Meg" March or refer to Margaret "Meg" March. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
The Role of Women Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Signet Classics edition of Little Women published in 2012.
Part 1, Chapter 1 Quotes

“Our burdens are here, our road is before us…Now, my little pilgrims, suppose you begin again, not in play, but in earnest, and see how far on you can get before Father comes home.”

Related Characters: Margaret "Marmee" March (speaker), Josephine "Jo" March, Margaret "Meg" March, Elizabeth "Beth" March, Amy Curtis March, Robert March
Page Number: 16
Explanation and Analysis:

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Part 1, Chapter 9 Quotes

“I don’t like fuss and feathers.”

Related Characters: Theodore "Laurie" Laurence (speaker), Margaret "Meg" March
Related Symbols: Birds
Page Number: 98
Explanation and Analysis:

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Part 1, Chapter 20 Quotes

“I knew there was mischief brewing. I felt it, and now it’s worse than I imagined. I just wish I could marry Meg myself, and keep her safe in the famiy.”

Related Characters: Josephine "Jo" March (speaker), Margaret "Meg" March, John Brooke
Page Number: 208
Explanation and Analysis:

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Part 1, Chapter 22 Quotes

“I remember a time when this hand was white and smooth, and your first care was to keep it so. It was very pretty then, but to me it is much prettier now, for in these seeming blemishes I read a little history. A burnt offering has been made to vanity, this hardened palm has earned something better than blisters, and I’m sure the sewing done by these pricked fingers will last a long time, so much good will went into the stitches.”

Related Characters: Robert March (speaker), Margaret "Meg" March
Page Number: 227
Explanation and Analysis:

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Part 2, Chapter 24 Quotes

“Meg and John begin humbly, but I have a feeling that there will be quite as much happiness in the little house as in the big one. It’s a great mistake for young girls like Meg to leave themselves nothing to do but dress, give orders, and gossip.”

Related Characters: Margaret "Marmee" March (speaker), Margaret "Meg" March, John Brooke
Page Number: 248
Explanation and Analysis:

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Part 2, Chapter 25 Quotes

Meg looked very like a rose herself, for all that was best and sweetest in heart and soul seemed to bloom into her face that day, making it fair and tender, with a charm more beautiful than beauty.

Related Characters: Margaret "Meg" March
Related Symbols: Flowers
Page Number: 255
Explanation and Analysis:

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Neither silk, lace, nor orange flowers would she have. “I don’t want a fashionable wedding, but only those about me whom I love, and to them I wish to look and be my familiar self.”

Related Characters: Margaret "Meg" March (speaker)
Related Symbols: Flowers
Page Number: 255
Explanation and Analysis:

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It wasn’t at all the thing, I’m afraid, but the minute she was fairly married, Meg cried,” The first kiss for Marmee!” and turning, gave it with her heart on her lips.

Related Characters: Margaret "Meg" March (speaker), Margaret "Marmee" March
Page Number: 258
Explanation and Analysis:

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Part 2, Chapter 28 Quotes

…Meg learned to love her husband better for his poverty, because it seemed to have made a man of him, given him the strength and courage to fight his own way, and taught him a tender patience with which to bear and comfort the natural longings and failures of those he loved.

Related Characters: Margaret "Meg" March, John Brooke
Page Number: 291
Explanation and Analysis:

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Part 2, Chapter 47 Quotes

Touched to the heart, Mrs. March could only stretch out her arms, as if to gather children and grandchildren to herself, and say, with face and voice full of motherly love, gratitude, and humility…
“Oh, my girls, however long you may live, I never can wish you a greater happiness than this!”

Related Characters: Margaret "Marmee" March (speaker), Josephine "Jo" March, Margaret "Meg" March, Amy Curtis March
Page Number: 499
Explanation and Analysis:

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Margaret "Meg" March Character Timeline in Little Women

The timeline below shows where the character Margaret "Meg" March appears in Little Women. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 1: Playing Pilgrims
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...just a few days before Christmas in the year 1860. The four March girls – Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy - are sitting in their sparsely furnished living room. The March... (full context)
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...the girls decide to buy presents for themselves, given how tirelessly they’ve been working. Sixteen-year-old Meg has been working hard as a governess for the King family, fifteen-year-old Jo serves as... (full context)
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...behavior. Jo scoffs at Amy, putting her hands in her pockets and whistling a tune. Meg scolds them both for quarreling. She tells Jo that she should “remember that [she’s] a... (full context)
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The March girls are described. Meg is beautiful in the Victorian fashion: plump, pale, and blessed with lovely hair and hands.... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 2: A Merry Christmas
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...morning, the March girls awake to find copies of Pilgrim’s Progress tucked under their pillows. Meg suggests that they honor their mother’s gift of the books by studying them every morning,... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 3: The Laurence Boy
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Meg and Jo are invited to a New Year’s Eve party thrown by the Gardiners, a... (full context)
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Meg warns Jo to refrain from dancing and keep her back to the wall during the... (full context)
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Meg comes in search of Jo and reveals that she’s sprained her ankle thanks to her... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 4: Burdens
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...“Oh dear, how hard it does seem to take up our packs and go on,” Meg sighs. Jo and Meg trudge off to work. It’s revealed that the March family was... (full context)
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Jo and Meg return home from work and rehash the day’s events. Jo tells of how she tricked... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5: Being Neighborly
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...armful of offerings for Laurie: a plate of blanc mange (a kind of custard) from Meg and kittens from Beth. Jo straightens up Laurie’s quarters, and offers to read out loud... (full context)
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...that Laurie said he’d been grateful for the “medicine” Mrs. March had sent over, and Meg remarks that Laurie was paying Jo a compliment. Jo is flustered, and chides Meg for... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 6: Beth Finds the Palace Beautiful
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Meg and Amy soon join Jo in feeling welcome at Mr. Laurence’s house. The girls are... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 7: Amy’s Valley of Humiliation
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Amy borrows money from Meg in order to buy some pickled limes. Amy explains that limes are “the fashion” at... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 8: Jo Meets Apollyon
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Amy spies Jo and Meg getting ready to leave the house one Saturday afternoon, and demands to know where they’re... (full context)
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...delightful, but Jo can’t banish her guilt at losing her temper with Amy. Jo and Meg return home and everything seems normal. The next day, however, Jo discovers that her “book”... (full context)
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...resent Jo’s anger. The following day, Amy spies Jo and Laurie departing to go ice-skating. Meg encourages Amy to join them, with the hope that Jo will be in an amenable... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 9: Meg Goes to Vanity Fair
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The King children are sick with the measles, leaving Meg free to spend two weeks with her new friend Annie Moffat, whom she met at... (full context)
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The Moffats are quite fashionable, and “simple Meg” has trouble fitting in. Meg observes that the Moffats aren’t very intelligent or cultivated, but... (full context)
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On the evening of the first party (a small affair), Meg realizes that she will have to wear the dress she’d been saving for the big... (full context)
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Meg enjoys herself at the party. She receives three compliments, including one from the Moffats’ friend... (full context)
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The next day, Meg learns that the Moffats are inviting Laurie to the big party that week. Meg rebuffs... (full context)
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Meg makes quite a sensation at the party. Young men flock to her, and wealthy old... (full context)
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Meg returns home and is relieved that she can just be herself again. She confesses to... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 11: Experiments
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...Aunt March are away on holiday for the next three months. To celebrate Jo and Meg’s newfound freedom, the March girls all decide to try doing absolutely no work for one... (full context)
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...idleness and no work leaves them feeling irritable and fidgety. Jo tires of reading books, Meg ruins some of her clothes in an attempt to fix them up like the Moffats’... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 12: Camp Laurence
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Meg notices that she’s missing a glove. Beth brings in the mail from the P.O. Laurie... (full context)
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...meet up with Mr. Brooke, Sallie Gardiner and Ned Moffat (who came out to see Meg), and the Vaughns: twenty-year-old Kate (who acts as chaperone), twins Fred and Ned, and Grace.... (full context)
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...group makes up a story together and plays a truth-telling game. After this is over, Meg watches Kate draw on her sketchpad. They start talking, and Meg reveals to Kate that... (full context)
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Mr. Brooke asks Meg if she liked the song translation Laurie sent her earlier that day. Kate asks Meg... (full context)
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...when the rest of the group is singing songs, Ned sings a sentimental serenade to Meg, which she finds hysterical. He scolds her for snubbing him. “How can you be so... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 13: Castles in the Air
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...garden. He follows them at a distance, and spies them sitting in a forest glade. Meg is sewing, Jo is knitting, Beth is sorting pinecones, and Amy is sketching ferns. Laurie... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 14: Secrets
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...stories to the local newspaper. Laurie, in turn, reveals that he knows the whereabouts of Meg’s missing glove. Jo is quite displeased when he tells her where it is. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 15: A Telegram
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November. Meg is complaining about how dull and full of drudgery her life is. Amy posits that... (full context)
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...and promises to keep an eye on the girls while Mrs. March goes away. Meanwhile, Meg almost runs into Mr. Brooke as she’s rushing about the house. Mr. Brooke informs her... (full context)
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...regret her decision. Later that night, Jo cries into her pillow about her lost hair. Meg overhears her and comforts her. Jo swears she doesn’t regret her decision. The girls anxiously... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 16: Letters
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...themselves with their work. Hannah gives the girls coffee as a treat, and Jo and Meg take their breakfast turnovers and head out to see to Aunt March and the Kings. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 17: Little Faithful
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...holiday from Aunt March, Amy drops her housework in order to play with clay, and Meg forgets her sewing in lieu of writing letters to Marmee. Beth, however, continues to be... (full context)
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Beth goes to Meg and asks her to see the Hummels, as their baby is sick. Meg feigns fatigue... (full context)
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Laurie and Meg wonder if Mrs. March should be told of Beth’s illness. Hannah (who has experience with... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 18: Dark Days
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...household stays up to keep watch over Beth that night. When midnight strikes, Jo sees Meg kneeling with her face hidden. Jo suddenly fears that Beth has died and Meg cannot... (full context)
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Dawn is breaking. Meg brings Jo the rose that they’d found in the garden. “I thought this would hardly... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 19: Amy’s Will
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...when she felt particularly ill, Beth dictated her own meager last will and testament to Meg, in which Beth (lacking wealth) asked for locks of her hair to be given to... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 20: Confidential
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...Mrs. March and tells her what Laurie told her: that Mr. Brooke took one of Meg’s gloves, and that he likes Meg but worries that the match won’t be approved given... (full context)
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Jo is upset that her mother has taken Mr. Brooke’s side, and fears that Meg will be married off and taken away from the family. Jo expresses a wish that... (full context)
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Jo asks her mother if she wouldn’t rather see Meg married to a rich man. Mrs. March replies that she’d rather see her daughters happily,... (full context)
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Meg walks in at that moment with a letter for Mrs. March to proofread. Mrs. March... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 21: Laurie Makes Mischief, and Jo Makes Peace
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The next day, Jo brings a sealed letter for Meg from the P.O. Meg cries out in embarrassment when she reads the letter, and she... (full context)
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Jo runs to fetch Laurie. While she’s gone, Mrs. March asks Meg if she loves Mr. Brooke. Meg responds that she wants nothing to do with love... (full context)
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After all is said and done, Meg begins to think about Mr. Brooke more than ever. Jo worries that “Laurie’s prank had... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 22: Pleasant Meadows
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The March girls think they’ve gotten everything they could want on Christmas (Mr. Laurence gives Meg her first silk dress; Jo receives a long-desired book) until, that evening, Laurie brings Mr.... (full context)
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...observes how much his daughters have grown since he last saw them. He’s pleased that Meg’s hands, once spotless, are calloused from work. He’s also pleased to see that Jo is... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 23: Aunt March Settles the Question
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...complete now that Mr. March is home – still, they feel like something is missing. Meg (who seems love-struck) is an object of scrutiny, and Jo shakes her fist at the... (full context)
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Jo mentions to Meg that she doesn’t seem like her old self, and asks her how she’d respond to... (full context)
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Mr. Brooke arrives to collect his umbrella just as Meg finishes her speech. Jo, flustered, tells Mr. Brook that she’ll fetch it and jumbles her... (full context)
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Meg and Mr. Brooke are left alone. Mr. Brooke confesses his love to Meg, and asks... (full context)
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...enters the room, and Mr. Brooke slips away. Aunt March realizes that Mr. Brooke is Meg’s suitor, and decides to give Meg a piece of her mind. She informs Meg that... (full context)
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...March storms out. Mr. Brooke rushes in and confesses that he overheard the whole conversation. Meg forgets her coquetry and tells Mr. Brooke that he should stay with her. Jo enters... (full context)
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...of Jo), Mr. Laurence, and Laurie are overjoyed by the news that Mr. Brooke and Meg are in love. Jo confides in Laurie that she feels like she’s lost her dearest... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 24: Gossip
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...Brooke served in the Civil War for one year, and was discharged after being wounded. Meg has grown more beautiful and more “wise in housewifely arts.” Ned Moffat and Sallie Gardiner... (full context)
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We’re then told about the “Dovecote” – the house that “Mr. Brooke had prepared for Meg’s first home.” It is a small and simple house, but the entire family’s contributions to... (full context)
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The wedding is scheduled to happen tomorrow, and Laurie – who has been giving Meg gag housewarming gifts for a while now - arrives at the Dovecote with another silly... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 25: The First Wedding
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It’s Meg’s wedding day, and the roses are out in full bloom at the March residence. Meg... (full context)
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...by how simple the proceedings are. Mr. March marries the couple, and after she’s married Meg declares that the first kiss shall go to Marmee. (full context)
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No wine is served at the simple reception, prompting Laurie and Meg to have a conversation about alcohol. Laurie is pleased that the Marches aren’t serving alcohol,... (full context)
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...spite of its simplicity. The Marches then gather at the Dovecote to say farewell to Meg. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 26: Artistic Attempts
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...on delicacies: cold chicken and tongue, French chocolate, and ice cream. With the help of Meg and Jo (who wonders why Amy should go through such trouble for “a parcel of... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 28: Domestic Experiences
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Meg begins married life determined to be a model housekeeper. Her initial efforts are overzealous –... (full context)
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Meg then takes a notion to fill her pantry with homemade currant preserves. She has her... (full context)
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Mr. Brooke, meanwhile, decides to bring a friend home for supper – something Meg had always encouraged him to do. Upon returning home with his friend, he’s shocked to... (full context)
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That night, when Mr. Brooke returns home, Meg gives Mr. Brooke the cold shoulder until she recalls some advice Mrs. March had given... (full context)
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A few months later, in the autumn, Meg renews her friendship with Sallie Moffat. Meg quickly grows envious of Sallie’s ability to buy... (full context)
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...the end of the week, when she and Mr. Brooke are going over their budget, Meg confesses to buying the dress. Mr. Brooke is bewildered and disappointed. Meg apologizes, but also... (full context)
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...the order for his new winter coat, given that he can no longer afford it. Meg weeps bitterly, and the two end up having a long discussion that helps Meg to... (full context)
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The next day, Meg goes to Sallie and asks her to buy the dress from her as a favor;... (full context)
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The following summer, Meg experiences “the deepest and tenderest” experience “of a woman’s life:” she gives birth to twins,... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 38: On the Shelf
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Meanwhile, back at the Dovecote, Meg is wearing herself thin by devoting all of her time and energy to the twins.... (full context)
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Meg begins to feel abandoned, and she goes to Mrs. March for advice. Marmee explains that... (full context)
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Meg tries this formula, and discovers that Mr. Brooke is far better at disciplining the children... (full context)
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Meg reveals to her husband that she’s trying to take Mrs. March’s advice, and Mr. Brooke... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 42: All Alone
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One day, while sewing with Meg, Jo reflects on how good marriage has been for her sister. Meg suggests to Jo... (full context)