Little Women

Little Women

Theodore "Laurie" Laurence Character Analysis

Grandson of Mr. Laurence and (eventually) Amy’s husband. Laurie is the rich and handsome neighbor boy who befriends the March girls early on in the book. Orphaned at a young age, Laurie has been primarily raised by Mr. Laurence. Laurie is half Italian, which is often cited as the source of his passionate nature. Jo is his first love, but after she refuses to marry him he eventually falls in love with Amy, who suits him far better than Jo would have.

Theodore "Laurie" Laurence Quotes in Little Women

The Little Women quotes below are all either spoken by Theodore "Laurie" Laurence or refer to Theodore "Laurie" Laurence. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
The Role of Women Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Signet Classics edition of Little Women published in 2012.
Part 1, Chapter 9 Quotes

“I don’t like fuss and feathers.”

Related Characters: Theodore "Laurie" Laurence (speaker), Margaret "Meg" March
Related Symbols: Birds
Page Number: 98
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Little Women quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Part 2, Chapter 35 Quotes

“I can’t love anyone else, and I’ll never forget you, Jo, never! Never!” with a stamp to emphasize his passionate words.
“What shall I do with him?” sighed Jo, finding that emotions were more unmanageable than she expected. “You haven’t heard what I wanted to tell you. Sit down and listen, for indeed I want to do right and make you happy,” she said, hoping to soothe him with a little reason, which proved that she knew nothing about love.

Related Characters: Josephine "Jo" March (speaker), Theodore "Laurie" Laurence (speaker)
Page Number: 371
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Get the entire Little Women LitChart as a printable PDF.
Little women.pdf.medium

Theodore "Laurie" Laurence Character Timeline in Little Women

The timeline below shows where the character Theodore "Laurie" Laurence appears in Little Women. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 3: The Laurence Boy
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...dash to hide in a curtained recess, only to run smack into Mr. Laurence’s grandson, Laurie. (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Jo is somewhat nervous to run into Laurie, given that she’s only ever talked to him once before. (Sometime in the recent past,... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
...front of her dress, and ruins Meg’s glove in an attempt to clean it up. Laurie appears and, against Meg’s wishes, puts things to rights. He brings Meg coffee and bonbons,... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5: Being Neighborly
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...– is separated by a low hedge from Mr. Laurence’s large stone mansion.. She spies Laurie sitting near one of the windows on the second floor. “Poor boy! All alone and... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Jo arrives soon after with an armful of offerings for Laurie: a plate of blanc mange (a kind of custard) from Meg and kittens from Beth.... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie steps out momentarily to see his doctor, and while he’s gone Mr. Laurence slips in... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Jo reveals that Laurie said he’d been grateful for the “medicine” Mrs. March had sent over, and Meg remarks... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 6: Beth Finds the Palace Beautiful
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...soon realize that Mr. Laurence feels that they’re doing him a favor by visiting with Laurie. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 7: Amy’s Valley of Humiliation
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
...the rules, and warns Amy that she is becoming conceited. Amy then realizes that although Laurie is quite accomplished and talented, he isn’t conceited, and that his modesty is part of... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 8: Jo Meets Apollyon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...mind her own business, and Amy quickly guesses that they’re going to the theater with Laurie. Meg explains that Mrs. March wants Amy to go another time, given that Amy’s recovering... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
...forgiveness, but soon grows to resent Jo’s anger. The following day, Amy spies Jo and Laurie departing to go ice-skating. Meg encourages Amy to join them, with the hope that Jo... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...falls through the thin ice. Jo hears her cry out and is paralyzed with fear. Laurie rushes by her and hauls Amy out of the river. They rush Amy home, where... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 9: Meg Goes to Vanity Fair
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...Annie’s. As she prepares for the party, a box of roses is delivered. They’re from Laurie, accompanied by a note from Mrs. March. Meg uses the flowers to decorate her dress... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...about her. The women speculate that Mrs. March is planning on marrying Meg off to Laurie, given that he’s rich. They also pity Meg her shabby clothing, and wonder if they’ll... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
The next day, Meg learns that the Moffats are inviting Laurie to the big party that week. Meg rebuffs their attempts to insinuate that she’s romantically... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...flock to her, and wealthy old folks gossip about her. Meg is shocked to see Laurie – she didn’t think he’d come to the party – and Laurie tells Meg that... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...the Moffats’ party, and that she overheard gossip that Mrs. March wanted Meg to marry Laurie. Mrs. March admits that she does have “plans” for her daughters, but that her plans... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 10: The P.C. and P.O.
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Spring arrives. The March girls decide to vote Laurie into the P.C. (The Pickwick Club), their secret society and newsletter-writing club that features articles,... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 11: Experiments
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
...pitch in to make a sub-par breakfast, which they proudly serve to Marmee. Jo invites Laurie over for dinner, and gets in well over her head when she attempts to cook... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 12: Camp Laurence
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Meg notices that she’s missing a glove. Beth brings in the mail from the P.O. Laurie has sent Meg a translation of a German song done by his tutor, Mr. Brooke.... (full context)
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
The March girls set out to Laurie’s house, where they meet up with Mr. Brooke, Sallie Gardiner and Ned Moffat (who came... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke asks Meg if she liked the song translation Laurie sent her earlier that day. Kate asks Meg if she reads German. “Not very well,”... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 13: Castles in the Air
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Laurie has lazed about most of the day. Lying in his hammock, he spies the March... (full context)
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Jo explains to Laurie that the society is part of the girls’ game of acting out Pilgrim’s Progress. “We... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
The girls and Laurie then go on to imagine what it would be like if their “castles in the... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 14: Secrets
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
...slipped a manuscript into her pocket. She goes into town and enters an office building. Laurie, having just stepped out of the gymnasium across the street, spies Jo going into the... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie tells Jo that he has a secret, and that he’ll tell her his secret if... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...the Marches think Jo is acting odd. She’s rude to Mr. Brooke, and she and Laurie seem to be plotting something (in actuality, they’re secretly chattering about Jo’s newspaper venture). Finally... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 15: A Telegram
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...fortune for the Marches through their art, but Meg remains skeptical. Meanwhile, Mrs. March and Laurie come home. All is normal until Hannah bursts in with news of a telegram. Mrs.... (full context)
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...for most afflictions”) encourages Mrs. March to get ready to leave for Washington right away. Laurie rushes off to send a telegram to Washington, and Mrs. March makes plans to leave... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 16: Letters
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
The girls, Hannah, Laurie, and Mr. Laurence all write letters to Mrs. March. In their letters, the March girls... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 17: Little Faithful
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
...cold as an excuse not to go (even though she’d been well enough to see Laurie earlier). Beth implores them to go – she would do it herself, but her head... (full context)
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
...Beth’s illness, Jo resolves to be Beth’s primary nurse, and Amy (after some coaxing from Laurie, who promises to visit her every day) is made to stay with Aunt March in... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie and Meg wonder if Mrs. March should be told of Beth’s illness. Hannah (who has... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 18: Dark Days
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...be sent for. Jo runs out the door to send a telegram. She bumps into Laurie when she returns, and she tells him that she’s sent for Marmee, and about Beth’s... (full context)
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...so Beth can see it when she wakes. Outside, the girls hear sleigh bells, and Laurie calls from outside to announce Mrs. March’s arrival. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 19: Amy’s Will
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...chores, coupled with her schoolwork, leave her with little free time. Thankfully, Amy has allies. Laurie comes by every day to take her out, and the French maid Esther has taken... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Amy asks Esther and Laurie to sign the will as witnesses. Laurie reads the document and asks Amy if she... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 20: Confidential
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie goes to Aunt March’s house to tell Amy the good news. Mrs. March bursts in... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
That evening, Jo goes to Mrs. March and tells her what Laurie told her: that Mr. Brooke took one of Meg’s gloves, and that he likes Meg... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...into money out of a sense of duty. Jo asks why Meg can’t just marry Laurie, and her mother replies that Laurie is far too young and undependable. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 21: Laurie Makes Mischief, and Jo Makes Peace
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...twittery and cross, doesn’t eat, lies awake, and mopes in corners.” Meanwhile, after much teasing, Laurie soon learns Jo’s secret about Meg and Mr. Brooke. He feels slighted that he wasn’t... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...to Meg, in which he declares his undying love. Jo knows instantly that this is Laurie’s work, and she vows to make him pay. Meg reveals that she had secretly responded... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Jo runs to fetch Laurie. While she’s gone, Mrs. March asks Meg if she loves Mr. Brooke. Meg responds that... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
After Laurie has gone home, Jo feels ashamed that she wasn’t more forgiving. She goes to his... (full context)
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Jo tries to reason with Laurie, but he refuses to leave his room until his grandfather apologizes. Laurie briefly fantasizes about... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...looking for a new volume, Mr. Laurence turns to her and demands to know what Laurie did wrong. The two engage in a verbal tug-of-war. Jo convinces Mr. Laurence that he’s... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...and done, Meg begins to think about Mr. Brooke more than ever. Jo worries that “Laurie’s prank had hastened the evil day for her.” (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 22: Pleasant Meadows
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...Mr. March’s return after the New Year fills the March girls with hope. Jo and Laurie surprise Beth with a snow maiden decorated with modest Christmas gifts, accompanied by a poem... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
...Laurence gives Meg her first silk dress; Jo receives a long-desired book) until, that evening, Laurie brings Mr. March into the parlor. Mrs. March and her daughters are ecstatic. Later that... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 23: Aunt March Settles the Question
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
The Marches (with the exception of Jo), Mr. Laurence, and Laurie are overjoyed by the news that Mr. Brooke and Meg are in love. Jo confides... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 24: Gossip
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...free to write for the newspaper and to tend to Beth (who is still delicate). Laurie, meanwhile, is in college, and has become a bit of a dandy. (full context)
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
The wedding is scheduled to happen tomorrow, and Laurie – who has been giving Meg gag housewarming gifts for a while now - arrives... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie mentions that a friend from his at college is quite stricken with Amy, and Jo... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 25: The First Wedding
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
No wine is served at the simple reception, prompting Laurie and Meg to have a conversation about alcohol. Laurie is pleased that the Marches aren’t... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 30: Consequences
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
...of her flowers wilt, and she sells few things. After supper, however, the tide turns: Laurie sends in a new shipment of flowers from his conservatory, and brings a group of... (full context)
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...pleasure trip” for her, given that she hopes to seriously study art while in Rome. Laurie sees Amy off at the docks, and promises her that he will go to Europe... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 32: Tender Troubles
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...March. After observing Beth in secret, Jo concludes that she has fallen in love with Laurie. This leads Jo to daydream about love and marriage. She considers, briefly, her family’s speculation... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
That night, Jo watches Laurie talk to Beth in the Marches’ parlor. Jo retreats to the sofa, so as to... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie and Jo banter about flirtation. Jo scolds Laurie for flirting with girls who don’t care... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...bed, Jo overhears Beth weeping into her pillow. She assumes that Beth is crying about Laurie. (full context)
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Several days later, prompted by both Beth and Laurie’s behavior, Jo tells Mrs. March that she thinks it would be best if she left... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
On the day of her departure, Jo asks Beth to take care of Laurie for her while she’s away. As she says goodbye to Laurie, he leans in and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 34: Friend
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...June. Before she leaves, she invites Professor Bhaer to visit her in a month, when Laurie graduates. Professor Bhaer seems troubled by the mention of Laurie, and he politely turns down... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 35: Heartache
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie has worked hard during Jo’s absence, and he has graduated with honors. After his graduation... (full context)
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Jo meets with Laurie the following day. While they walk through the woods and fields near Laurie’s house, he... (full context)
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie bitterly speculates that Jo is in love with Professor Bhaer. Jo denies it, and then... (full context)
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Jo goes to Mr. Laurence and tells him about Laurie. Later that day, Mr. Laurence confronts a distraught Laurie. Mr. Laurence reveals that he has... (full context)
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
As Laurie says his goodbyes, he embraces Jo and begs her to reconsider. “Teddy, I wish I... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 37: New Impressions
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
It’s Christmas Day, in Nice, France. While strolling up the Promenade des Anglais, Laurie unexpectedly runs into Amy, who’s driving a little carriage. She’s overjoyed to see him, and... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Amy sweeps into the ball and greets Laurie, who has brought her flowers. The ball is filled with minor aristocrats (including a Russian... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie and Amy flirt – they dance together, and then Amy coquettishly pushes him away in... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 39: Lazy Laurence
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie remains in Nice for a month. He seems to have become quite lazy, and Amy... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Amy asks Laurie when he’s going back to Mr. Laurence – she’s asked him this before, and each... (full context)
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie continues to lounge indolently, and Amy grows frustrated. She tells him that she and her... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Amy feels bad for Laurie, but continues to scold him for being lazy. She tells him that Jo wouldn’t have... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
The next day, Amy receives a note from Laurie, stating that he’s returning to London to be with Mr. Laurence. He sends his regards... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 41: Learning to Forget
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie works to forget Jo. At first, he tries to bury his sadness in music, attempting... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie realizes that his pain is subsiding far more quickly than he thought it would. He... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie shakes himself from his growing contentment and writes one last letter to Jo, begging her... (full context)
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Genuineness, Simplicity, and Natural Beauty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...society now half so much as she did to be a lovable woman.” She and Laurie take up a lively correspondence, and Amy starts to show signs of lovesickness (she becomes... (full context)
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...stay in Europe, and Amy resolves to bear the pain as well as she can. Laurie receives a letter about Beth the same day; he makes preparations to be with Amy... (full context)
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie finds Amy sitting by the shore of the lake, and the minute he sees her... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Aunt Carrol realizes that Amy had been pining for Laurie, and she invites him to stay with them. One day, as Amy and Laurie are... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 42: All Alone
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Amy writes to tell her family about her betrothal to Laurie. Jo is grave when she reads the news, but soon reveals that she’s happy. Jo... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 43: Surprises
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Jo awakens soon after to find Laurie standing before her. Laurie reveals that he and Amy eloped while they were in Europe.... (full context)
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...parlor. Amy’s European airs are noted by the Marches, and Jo notes that she and Laurie look wonderful together. The party goes upstairs, leaving Jo alone. She feels sorry for herself... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 44: My Lord and Lady
Christianity, Morality, and Goodness Theme Icon
Work and Social Class Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Laurie and Amy have a private conversation. Laurie exclaims that Professor Bhaer is going to marry... (full context)