Long Day’s Journey into Night

by

Eugene O’Neill

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Mary Tyrone Character Analysis

The matriarch of the Tyrone family. A recovering morphine addict, Mary is “restless” at the beginning of the play because she has recently returned from rehab and is trying hard to stay clean. However, everything around her seems to put her on edge, especially the foghorn that bleats throughout the night and keeps her awake. At the same time, this is perhaps only an excuse to return to her old ways of taking morphine. Before she relapses, her family members all notice the tell-tale signs, suggesting that this has happened many times before. Even so, Mary shames them all into giving her privacy, framing their concern as intrusive and distrustful. In turn, they give her the benefit of the doubt by granting her independence. Still, they’re relatively unsurprised when she starts using morphine again. Unfortunately, her drug use only encourages her to guilt-trip her family members even more, so that she starts blaming them for her own troubles and shortcomings. Indeed, she chastises James for never buying her a proper home, suggests that Jamie purposefully infected Eugene—her second-born who died as a baby—with measles, and blames James for hiring the doctor who first got her addicted to morphine. As she spirals back into full-fledged drug use, she also spends more and more time romanticizing her past life, when she lived as a young girl in a convent and wanted to be either a nun or a concert pianist. Unwilling to confront her bleak present reality, she plunges into a kind of nostalgia that not only blinds her to what’s going on in her life, but also isolates her from her family.

Mary Tyrone Quotes in Long Day’s Journey into Night

The Long Day’s Journey into Night quotes below are all either spoken by Mary Tyrone or refer to Mary Tyrone. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Yale edition of Long Day’s Journey into Night published in 1987.
Act One Quotes

What strikes one immediately is her extreme nervousness. Her hands are never still. They were once beautiful hands, with long, tapering fingers, but rheumatism has knotted the joints and warped the fingers, so that now they have an ugly crippled look. One avoids looking at them, the more so because one is conscious she is sensitive about their appearance and humiliated by her inability to control the nervousness which draws attention to them.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone
Page Number: 12
Explanation and Analysis:

TYRONE
You’re a fine lunkhead! Haven’t you any sense? The one thing to avoid is saying anything that would get her more upset over Edmund.

JAMIE
Shrugging his shoulders.
All right. Have it your way. I think it’s the wrong idea to let Mama go on kidding herself. It will only make the shock worse when she has to face it. Anyway, you can see she’s deliberately fooling herself with that summer cold talk. She knows better.

Page Number: 29
Explanation and Analysis:

Yes, this time you can see how strong and sure of herself she is. She’s a different woman entirely from the other times. She has control of her nerves—or she had until Edmund got sick. Now you can feel her growing tense and frightened underneath. I wish to God we could keep the truth from her, but we can’t if he has to be sent to a sanatorium. What makes it worse is her father died of consumption. She worshiped him and she’s never forgotten. Yes, it will be hard for her. But she can do it! She has the will power now! We must help her, Jamie, in every way we can!

Related Characters: James Tyrone (speaker), Mary Tyrone, Edmund Tyrone, Jamie Tyrone
Page Number: 37
Explanation and Analysis:

Still […] people like them stand for something. I mean they have decent, presentable homes they don’t have to be ashamed of. They have friends who entertain them and whom they entertain. They’re not cut off from everyone.

She turns back from the window.

Not that I want anything to do with them. I’ve always hated this town and everyone in it. You know that. I never wanted to live here in the first place, but your father liked it and insisted on building this house, and I’ve had to come here every summer.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone (speaker), James Tyrone, Edmund Tyrone
Page Number: 44
Explanation and Analysis:

EDMUND
Anyway, you’ve got to be fair, Mama. It may have been all his fault in the beginning, but you know that later on, even if he’d wanted to, we couldn’t have had people here—
He flounders guiltily.
I mean, you wouldn’t have wanted them.

MARY
Wincing—her lips quivering pitifully.
Don’t. I can’t bear having you remind me.

EDMUND
Don’t take it that way! Please, Mama! I’m trying to help. Because it’s bad for you to forget. The right way is to remember. So you’ll always be on your guard. You know what’s happened before.
Miserably.
God, Mama, you know I hate to remind you. I’m doing it because it’s been so wonderful having you home the way you’ve been, and it would be terrible—

Related Characters: James Tyrone, Mary Tyrone, Edmund Tyrone
Page Number: 46
Explanation and Analysis:

MARY
Her hands fluttering.

It makes it so much harder, living in this atmosphere of constant suspicion, knowing everyone is spying on me, and none of you be­lieve in me, or trust me.

EDMUND
That’s crazy, Mama. We do trust you.

MARY
If there was only some place I could go to get away for a day, or even an afternoon, some woman friend I could talk to—not about anything serious, simply laugh and gossip and forget for a while—someone besides the servants—that stupid Cathleen!

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone, Edmund Tyrone, Cathleen
Page Number: 47
Explanation and Analysis:
Act Two, Scene One Quotes

Because he’s always sneering at someone else, always looking for the worst weakness in everyone.

Then with a strange, abrupt change to a detached, impersonal tone.

But I suppose life has made him like that, and he can’t help it. None of us can help the things life has done to us. They’re done before you realize it, and once they’re done they make you do other things until at last everything comes between you and what you’d like to be, and you’ve lost your true self forever.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone (speaker), James Tyrone, Edmund Tyrone, Jamie Tyrone
Page Number: 63
Explanation and Analysis:

Oh, I’m so sick and tired of pretending this is a home! You won’t help me! You won’t put yourself out the least bit! You don’t know how to act in a home! You don’t really want one! You never have wanted one—never since the day we were married! You should have remained a bachelor and lived in second-rate hotels and entertained your friends in barrooms!

She adds strangely, as if she were now talking aloud to herself rather than to Tyrone.

Then nothing would ever have happened.

They stare at her. Tyrone knows now. He suddenly looks a tired, bitterly sad old man.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone (speaker), James Tyrone, Edmund Tyrone, Jamie Tyrone
Page Number: 69
Explanation and Analysis:

You’re to blame, James. How could you let him? Do you want to kill him? Don’t you remember my father? He wouldn’t stop after he was stricken. He said doctors were fools! He thought, like you, that whiskey is a good tonic!

A look of terror comes into her eyes and she stammers.

But, of course, there’s no comparison at all. I don’t know why I—Forgive me for scolding you, James. One small drink won’t hurt Edmund. It might be good for him, if it gives him an appetite.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone (speaker), James Tyrone, Edmund Tyrone, Jamie Tyrone
Page Number: 70
Explanation and Analysis:
Act Two, Scene Two Quotes

The family are returning from lunch as the curtain rises. Mary is the first to enter from the back par­lor. Her husband follows. He is not with her as he was in the similar entrance after breakfast at the opening of Act One. He avoids touching her or looking at her. There is condemnation in his face, mingled now with the beginning of an old weary, helpless resignation. Jamie and Edmund follow their father. Jamie’s face is hard with defensive cyni­cism. Edmund tries to copy this defense but without success. He plainly shows he is heartsick as well as physically ill.

Page Number: 73
Explanation and Analysis:

TYRONE
You ought to be kicked out in the gutter! But if I did it, you know damned well who’d weep and plead for you, and excuse you and complain till I let you come back.

JAMIE
A spasm of pain crosses his face.
Christ, don’t I know that? No pity? I have all the pity in the world for her. I understand what a hard game to beat she’s up against— which is more than you ever have! My lingo didn’t mean I had no feeling. I was merely putting bluntly what we all know, and have to live with now, again.

Bitterly.

The cures are no damned good except for a while. The truth is there is no cure and we’ve been saps to hope—

Cynically

They never come back!

Page Number: 78
Explanation and Analysis:

It was my fault. I should have insisted on staying with Eugene and not have let you persuade me to join you, just because I loved you. Above all, I shouldn’t have let you insist I have another baby to take Eugene’s place, because you thought that would make me forget his death. I knew from experience by then that children should have homes to be born in, if they are to be good children, and women need homes, if they are to be good mothers. I was afraid all the time I carried Edmund. I knew something terrible would happen. I knew I’d proved by the way I’d left Eugene that I wasn’t worthy to have another baby, and that God would punish me if I did. I never should have borne Edmund.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone (speaker), James Tyrone, Edmund Tyrone, Eugene Tyrone
Page Number: 91
Explanation and Analysis:

But some day, dear, I will find it again—some day when you’re all well, and I see you healthy and happy and successful, and I don’t have to feel guilty any more—some day when the Blessed Virgin Mary forgives me and gives me back the faith in Her love and pity I used to have in my convent days, and I can pray to Her again— when She sees no one in the world can believe in me even for a moment any more, then She will believe in me, and with Her help it will be so easy. I will hear myself scream with agony, and at the same time I will laugh because I will be so sure of myself.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone (speaker), Edmund Tyrone
Page Number: 96
Explanation and Analysis:
Act Three Quotes

Mary is paler than before and her eyes shine with unnatural brilliance. The strange detachment in her manner has intensified. She has hidden deeper within herself and found refuge and release in a dream where present reality is but an appearance to be accepted and dismissed un­feelingly—even with a hard cynicism—or entirely ignored. There is at times an uncanny gay, free youthfulness in her manner, as if in spirit she were released to become again, simply and without self-consciousness, the naive, happy, chattering schoolgirl of her convent days.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone
Page Number: 99
Explanation and Analysis:

Dreamily.
It wasn’t the fog I minded, Cathleen. I really love fog.

[…]

It hides you from the world and the world from you. You feel that everything has changed, and nothing is what it seemed to be. No one can find or touch you anymore.

[…]

It’s the foghorn I hate. It won’t let you alone. It keeps reminding you, and warning you, and calling you back.

She smiles strangely.

But it can’t tonight.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone (speaker), Cathleen
Related Symbols: The Fog
Page Number: 100
Explanation and Analysis:

You’re a sentimental fool. What is so wonderful about that first meeting between a silly romantic schoolgirl and a matinee idol? You were much happier before you knew he existed, in the Convent when you used to pray to the Blessed Virgin.

Longingly.

If I could only find the faith I lost, so I could pray again!

She pauses—then begins to recite the Hail Mary in a flat, empty tone.

“Hail, Mary, full of grace! The Lord is with Thee; blessed art Thou among women.”

Sneeringly.

You expect the Blessed Virgin to be fooled by a lying dope fiend re­citing words! You can’t hide from her!

She springs to her feet. Her hands fly up to pat her hair distractedly.

I must go upstairs. I haven’t taken enough. When you start again you never know exactly how much you need.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone (speaker), James Tyrone, Cathleen
Page Number: 99
Explanation and Analysis:

But I forgive. I always forgive you. So don’t look so guilty. I’m sorry I remembered out loud. I don’t want to be sad, or to make you sad. I want to remember only the happy part of the past.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone (speaker), James Tyrone
Related Symbols: Mary’s Wedding Dress
Page Number: 116
Explanation and Analysis:
Act Four Quotes

The fog was where I wanted to be. Halfway down the path you can’t see this house. You’d never know it was here. Or any of the other places down the avenue. I couldn’t see but a few feet ahead. I didn’t meet a soul. Everything looked and sounded unreal. Noth­ing was what it is. That’s what I wanted—to be alone with myself in another world where truth is untrue and life can hide from itself. Out beyond the harbor, where the road runs along the beach, I even lost the feeling of being on land. The fog and the sea seemed part of each other. It was like walking on the bottom of the sea. As if I had drowned long ago. As if I was a ghost belonging to the fog, and the fog was the ghost of the sea. It felt damned peaceful to be nothing more than a ghost within a ghost.

He sees his father staring at him with mingled worry and irritated disapproval. He grins mockingly.

Don’t look at me as if I’d gone nutty. I’m talking sense. Who wants

to see life as it is, if they can help it?

Related Characters: Edmund Tyrone (speaker), James Tyrone, Mary Tyrone
Related Symbols: The Fog
Page Number: 133
Explanation and Analysis:

Did it on purpose to make a bum of you. Or part of me did. A big part. That part that’s been dead so long. That hates life. My putting you wise so you’d learn from my mistakes. Believed that myself at times, but it’s a fake. Made my mistakes look good. Made getting drunk romantic. Made whores fascinating vampires instead of poor, stupid, diseased slobs they really are. Made fun of work as sucker’s game. Never wanted you succeed and make me look even worse by comparison. Wanted you to fail. Always jealous of you. Mama’s baby, Papa’s pet!

He stares at Edmund with increasing enmity.

And it was your being born that started Mama on dope. I know that’s not your fault, but all the same, God damn you, I can’t help hating your guts — !

Related Characters: Jamie Tyrone (speaker), James Tyrone, Mary Tyrone, Edmund Tyrone
Page Number: 169
Explanation and Analysis:

MARY
Looking around her.
Something I need terribly. I remember when I had it I was never lonely nor afraid. I can’t have lost it forever, I would die if I thought that. Because then there would be no hope.
She moves like a sleepwalker, around the back of Jamie's chair, then forward toward left front, passing behind Edmund.

EDMUND
Turns impulsively and grabs her arm. As he pleads he has the quality of a bewilderedly hurt little boy.
Mama! It isn’t a summer cold! I’ve got consumption!

MARY
For a second he seems to have broken through to her. She trembles and her expression becomes terrified. She calls distractedly, as if giving a command to herself.
No!
And instantly she is far away again. She murmurs gently but imperson­ally.
You must not try to touch me. You must not try to hold me. It isn’t right, when I am hoping to be a nun.
He lets his hand drop from her arm.

Related Characters: Mary Tyrone, Edmund Tyrone
Related Symbols: Mary’s Wedding Dress
Page Number: 177
Explanation and Analysis:
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Mary Tyrone Character Timeline in Long Day’s Journey into Night

The timeline below shows where the character Mary Tyrone appears in Long Day’s Journey into Night. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act One
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
One morning in August of 1912, James and Mary Tyrone walk into the parlor of their summer home after breakfast. The house is filled... (full context)
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
Love and Forgiveness Theme Icon
...smoke after breakfast. “It was McGuire put me on to them,” he says, to which Mary bitterly replies, “I hope he didn’t put you on to any new piece of property... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
Love and Forgiveness Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
The sound of coughing comes from the next room, and Mary tells James that he ought to be worried about the fact that Edmund isn’t eating... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
Defensively, Mary says she isn’t “upset,” and asks James what would make him think otherwise. “Why, nothing,... (full context)
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
Mary tells James she’ll “keep up the good work,” then admits she does feel “out of... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
Again, Mary and James hear their sons laughing in the next room, and James grouchily assumes the... (full context)
Love and Forgiveness Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
...a stronger likeness to his mother, mostly because of his visible nervousness. As they enter, Mary asks why Jamie is staring at her. “Is my hair coming down?” she asks. “Your... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
Love and Forgiveness Theme Icon
Edmund and Mary talk about the fact that James is a loud snorer, and Jamie agrees, saying, “The... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
Love and Forgiveness Theme Icon
...a convenient philosophy if you’ve no ambition in life except to—” Before he can finish, Mary cuts him off and changes the subject by asking her sons what they were laughing... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
...to stop criticizing Jamie. Edmund, for his part, stomps upstairs to read a book, and Mary tells James not to “mind” him because he “isn’t well,” though she quickly adds, “A... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
...Doctor Hardy thinks Edmund might have malarial fever from working in the tropics. “Doctor Hardy!” Mary scoffs. “I wouldn’t believe a thing he said, if he swore on a stack of... (full context)
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“You’re a fine lunkhead!” James says to Jamie when Mary leaves. “The one thing to avoid is saying anything that would get her more upset... (full context)
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The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
...the two months since she came home.” He goes on to say that “this time” Mary’s strength and confidence is evident. “She’s a different woman entirely from the other times,” he... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
James points out that the situation with Edmund is made worse by the fact that Mary’s father died of consumption. Nonetheless, he states his belief that Mary can find the willpower... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
Love and Forgiveness Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
...considers the story Jamie has just told him, saying, “It would be like a curse [Mary] can’t escape if worry over Edmund—It was in her long sickness after bringing him into... (full context)
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
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Love and Forgiveness Theme Icon
Suddenly, Jamie shushes his father because Mary has entered the room. “Well,” he says as a cover-up, “if we’re going to cut... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
On his way out, Jamie apologizes for telling Mary to be careful, and then he and James exit. Once alone, Mary sits in a... (full context)
Loneliness, Isolation, and Belonging Theme Icon
Looking out the window, Mary comments on their neighbors, whom she sees passing in a Mercedes. “People like them stand... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
Love and Forgiveness Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
“It was wrong from the start,” Mary says about the family’s summer house. “Everything was done in the cheapest way. Your father... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
“God, Mama, you know I hate to remind you,” Edmund says to Mary, maintaining that he’s only doing it for her own good. In response, she says she... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
Edmund tells Mary that he, Jamie, and James do trust her, but that they worry about her. Still,... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
Once more, Edmund insists he doesn’t suspect Mary, but she ignores him, saying she can’t blame him. “How can any one of us... (full context)
Act Two, Scene One
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
...suggest it,” he says, turning to the bottle. He then tells Cathleen to wake up Mary, but the housekeeper tells him his mother hasn’t been sleeping, but “lying down in the... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
“Where’s Mama?” Jamie asks, suddenly looking about himself. When Edmund tells him that Mary is upstairs, Jamie is visibly unsettled. “Is she coming down to lunch?” he asks, to... (full context)
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
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...that he hopes he’s wrong, but that he has good reason to be suspicious of Mary. At this point, the two brothers hear their mother coming downstairs, and Jamie takes this... (full context)
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Edmund, for his part, doesn’t notice that Mary is less nervous and that her eyes are brighter. In fact, he doesn’t even notice... (full context)
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Jamie makes a joke at his father’s expense, and Mary chastises him for not respecting James enough. “Stop sneering at your father! I won’t have... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
Loneliness, Isolation, and Belonging Theme Icon
As Edmund, Jamie, and Mary wait for James, they grow impatient. Mary, for her part, goes on a rant about... (full context)
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Edmund gets up and goes to summon James. Meanwhile, Jamie stares resentfully at Mary, who asks him why he’s looking at her so menacingly. “Oh, for God’s sake, do... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
...Edmund says, “He’s a liar! It’s a lie, isn’t it, Mama?” “What is a lie?” Mary responds. “Now you’re talking in riddles like Jamie.” Then, when she looks up at him,... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
Loneliness, Isolation, and Belonging Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
...asks Jamie, who says, “You won’t be singing a song yourself soon.” At this moment, Mary—who had momentarily stepped out to speak with the cook—comes in and speaks in a distant,... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
Seeing Edmund’s empty glass, Mary tells her son he shouldn’t be drinking. She then blames James for letting their son... (full context)
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After a moment, Mary notices that the Tyrone men are staring at her. “Please stop staring!” she says. “One... (full context)
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
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“James! I tried so hard! I tried so hard!” Mary says. “I suppose you did,” he answers, rather moved despite his anger and disappointment. “For... (full context)
Act Two, Scene Two
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It is half an hour later, and the Tyrone family has just finished lunch. Mary is once again incredibly nervous, “as if the strain of sitting through lunch with [her... (full context)
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
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Switching tracks, Mary tells Edmund she’s worried about him because he didn’t eat lunch, and he sullenly promises... (full context)
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Mary uses this opportunity to say she doesn’t trust Doctor Hardy because he’s so cheap, suggesting... (full context)
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
...comparison to religious devotion, though he himself is a bad Catholic. Still, he upholds that Mary might have been able to beat her addiction if she hadn’t “denied her faith.” “But... (full context)
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
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...Edmund takes issue with his family members’ pessimism, suggesting that they shouldn’t give up on Mary. “She can still stop,” he says. “I’m going to talk to her.” “You can’t talk... (full context)
Fatalism and Resignation Theme Icon
...he doesn’t have money to spend at a bar, Jamie leaves to get dressed, and Mary enters once more and asks her husband if he’s seen her glasses. O’Neill’s stage note... (full context)
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When James starts to leave for his “appointment at the Club,” Mary tries to stop him, saying she doesn’t want to be alone. She then says she’s... (full context)
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Mary tells James that she doesn’t like driving around in the car, making it clear that... (full context)
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In another reversal, Mary suddenly says, “James! We’ve loved each other! We always will! Let’s remember only that, and... (full context)
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Changing the subject, Mary remarks how lonely she is, maintaining that taking a drive in the car will do... (full context)
Denial, Blame, and Guilt Theme Icon
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...you to have some of the stuff hidden, and prescriptions for more!” James says to Mary. “I hope you’ll lay in a good stock ahead so we’ll never have another night... (full context)
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“I was so healthy before Edmund was born,” Mary continues. “You remember, James. There wasn’t a nerve in my body. Even traveling with you... (full context)
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Still reminiscing about the past, Mary thinks about her and James’s second son, Eugene, who died as a baby. “I swore... (full context)
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Edmund tries to level with Mary, reminding her that she’s “only just started” again, and saying, “You can still stop. You’ve... (full context)
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“I’ve become such a liar,” Mary admits. “I never lied about anything once upon a time. Now I have to lie,... (full context)
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Before Edmund leaves, Mary tells him not to give any of the money James lent him to Jamie, who... (full context)
Act Three
Loneliness, Isolation, and Belonging Theme Icon
It is almost dinner, and Mary is spending time with Cathleen, whom she has given considerable amounts of whiskey because she... (full context)
Loneliness, Isolation, and Belonging Theme Icon
Throughout their conversation, Cathleen rambles about random matters, but Mary doesn’t seem to notice. Instead, she focuses on voicing her own thoughts, using Cathleen as... (full context)
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Indulging her mistress, Cathleen accepts the drink and starts asking Mary questions. This encourages Mary to rehash her life as a young girl living in a... (full context)
Love and Forgiveness Theme Icon
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Mary tells Cathleen a story about the first time she met James. At the time, he... (full context)
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After Mary finishes her story, Cathleen retreats to the kitchen. Lounging in a chair, Mary speaks to... (full context)
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As Edmund and James enter, Mary gives them a warm welcome, urging her husband to have some whiskey and generally babbling... (full context)
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Ignoring James and Edmund, Mary talks about how Jamie has grown up to “disgrace” the family. At the same time,... (full context)
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The Past, Nostalgia, and Regret Theme Icon
“Do you know what I was telling [Cathleen], dear?” Mary asks James. “About the night my father took me to your dressing room and I... (full context)
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Once again reverting to nostalgia and sweetness, Mary reminisces about the beauty of her wedding dress, remembering how “particular” she was about how... (full context)
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When James is gone, Mary tells Edmund about his past, saying he’s stingy because of the way he was raised.... (full context)
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...says, “What I’ve got is serious, Mama. Doc Hardy knows for sure now.” Just as Mary begins to disparage Hardy, he pushes on, saying that the doctor had a specialist examine... (full context)
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Speaking honestly with Mary, Edmund informs her that people do die of what he has. He even begins to... (full context)
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Before Mary can go upstairs to take more morphine, James returns with a new bottle of whiskey,... (full context)
Act Four
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...son’s taste, saying that he should focus on Shakespeare. Pausing in their conversation, they hear Mary moving around upstairs. “I hope to God she doesn’t come down,” James admits. “Yes. She’ll... (full context)
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Edmund says that the hardest thing to witness regarding Mary’s addiction is “the blank wall she builds around herself.” “Or it’s more like a bank... (full context)
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James points out that part of the reason Mary relapsed has to do with how worried she is about Edmund, but Edmund rejects this... (full context)
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Edmund and James hear Mary moving around again upstairs, and Edmund says, “Yes, she moves above and beyond us, a... (full context)
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...a large drink. Head lolling, he launches into a tawdry song with disparaging lyrics about Mary. “Shut up!” Edmund threatens, but Jamie simply says, “Where’s the hophead? Gone to sleep?” Leaping... (full context)
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Jamie hypothesizes that the only reason he spoke so insultingly about Mary is because he’s so disappointed that she has relapsed. He really thought she would stay... (full context)
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...Tyrone men to attention. The song is stilted and awkward, and abruptly ceases. Moments later, Mary materializes in the doorway. Over one arm, her wedding dress is draped so that it... (full context)
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As Mary advances upon her family members, she “seems aware of them merely as she is aware... (full context)
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As if to herself, Mary speaks over Jamie’s sobs, saying, “I play so badly now. I’m all out of practice.... (full context)
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“It’s a wedding gown,” Mary explains as James takes the dress from her. “But I don’t know what I wanted... (full context)
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Unable to watch this display any longer, Edmund grabs Mary’s arm, turns her around, and yells, “Mama! It isn’t a summer cold! I’ve got consumption!”... (full context)
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...glass. When James raises his glass for a toast, his two sons follow suit, but Mary speaks before they have a chance to bring their glasses to their lips. As she... (full context)
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“I had a talk with Mother Elizabeth,” Mary says, speaking about the convent once again. “She is so sweet and good. A saint... (full context)
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Mary explains that Mother Elizabeth told her if she still wanted to be a nun after... (full context)