Love's Labor's Lost

Holofernes Character Analysis

Read our modern English translation.
A pedant, or schoolteacher. He mixes in a good deal of Latin phrases into his everyday conversation, and is rather arrogant in his ostentatious learning. He exemplifies traditional education and book-learning, and though he considers himself to be probably the most intelligent person in the play, he is easily outwitted by the supposedly simple page Mote.

Holofernes Quotes in Love's Labor's Lost

The Love's Labor's Lost quotes below are all either spoken by Holofernes or refer to Holofernes. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Love Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Simon & Schuster edition of Love's Labor's Lost published in 2005.
Act 5, Scene 1 Quotes

The very all of all is—but sweetheart, I do implore secrecy—that the King would have me present the Princess, sweet chuck, with some delightful ostentation, or show, or pageant, or antic, or firework.
. . .
Sir, you shall present before her the Nine Worthies.
. . .
Where will you find men worthy enough to present them?

Related Characters: Armado (speaker), Holofernes (speaker), Nathaniel (speaker), The Princess of France
Related Symbols: The Nine Worthies
Page Number: 5.1.109-125
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint ocLorem ipsum dolor sLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.LoreLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, con

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Love's Labor's Lost quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Act 5, Scene 2 Quotes

Judas I am—

A Judas!

Not Iscariot, sir.
Judas I am, yclept Maccabaeus.

Judas Maccabaeus clipped is plain Judas.

A kissing traitor.—How art thou proved Judas?

Judas I am—

The more shame for you, Judas.

Related Characters: Berowne (speaker), Dumaine (speaker), Holofernes (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Nine Worthies
Page Number: 5.2.662-670
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat null

Get the entire Love's... LitChart as a printable PDF.
Love s labor s lost.pdf.medium

Holofernes Character Timeline in Love's Labor's Lost

The timeline below shows where the character Holofernes appears in Love's Labor's Lost. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 4, Scene 2
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
A schoolmaster named Holofernes, a curate named Nathaniel, and Dull discuss the princess’ recent hunt. Nathaniel and Holofernes intersperse... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Holofernes tries to explain that haud credo is not a kind of deer, but continues to... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
...Cain’s birth that’s not five weeks old as yet?” The answer is the moon, and Holofernes gives the answer “Dictynna,” an obscure name for the Roman goddess of the moon. Dull... (full context)
Intelligence Theme Icon
Holofernes shares with Nathaniel a short poem he composed about the princess’ hunt. Nathaniel compliments it,... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
...that is supposedly from Armado, and asks Nathaniel to read it. Quoting lines of Latin, Holofernes looks at the letter and exclaims that it contains verses of poetry. Nathaniel reads the... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Holofernes says that Nathaniel read the poem’s meter wrong, and examines it. He reads the top... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Holofernes asks Nathaniel what he thought of the poem. He says it had good handwriting. He... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 1
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Holofernes, Nathaniel, and Dull have just come from dinner. Nathaniel compliments Holofernes’ wit, and mentions that... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Mote pokes fun at Holofernes and Nathaniel, saying “they have been at a great feast of languages and stolen the... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
Armado asks Holofernes if he is a teacher, and then explains that the king is entertaining the princess... (full context)
Men and Women Theme Icon
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
Armado asks Holofernes what he should perform, and Holofernes suggests “the Nine Worthies,” a pageant of nine famous... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 2
Men and Women Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
...enters as Alexander the Great. Berowne and Boyet again heckle the performer. Nathaniel leaves and Holofernes enters as Judas Maccabaeus along with Mote as the young Hercules. Holofernes announces Mote’s character,... (full context)
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
Boyet, Dumaine, and Berowne continue to wittily tease Holofernes, until he leaves. Armado now enters, as the Greek hero Hector. The audience teases and... (full context)
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
Holofernes, Nathaniel, Mote, and Costard return to the stage. Everyone divides into two groups, one representing... (full context)