Mansfield Park

Mansfield Park

Fanny Price Character Analysis

Fanny Price is the protagonist of Mansfield Park, though much has been made of the fact that, to many modern readers, she is not especially likeable. Fanny is a physically delicate, uptight, morally righteous, and easily-upset girl and later young woman, the niece of Sir Thomas and Lady Bertram and the cousin and later wife of Edmund. Fanny moves to Mansfield Park as a child in order to relieve her impoverished mother of a financial burden. At Mansfield, Fanny learns proper manners and improves her health through walking and riding. Fanny struggles with intense feelings of guilt thanks to her vicious aunt Mrs. Norris, who verbally abuses Fanny, constantly belittling her and calling her ungrateful. Fanny maintains a close relationship via letters with her brother William, and of the Bertrams she is closest with Edmund, with whom she is deeply and secretly in love. Over the course of the novel, Fanny’s strong moral compass serves her well, keeping her out of trouble and making her trustworthy to other characters. Henry Crawford attempts to woo Fanny and falls in love with her, but she refuses him time and time again because of her sense of their incompatibility and her love for Edmund. Ultimately, after Edmund fails to secure a marriage with Mary Crawford, Edmund and Fanny marry each other.

Fanny Price Quotes in Mansfield Park

The Mansfield Park quotes below are all either spoken by Fanny Price or refer to Fanny Price. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dover Publications edition of Mansfield Park published in 2001.
Chapter 1 Quotes

There will be some difficulty in our way, Mrs. Norris…as to the distinction proper to be made between the girls as they grow up… how, without depressing her spirits too far, to make her remember that she is not a Miss Bertram… they cannot be equals. Their rank, fortune, rights, and expectations will always be different.

Related Characters: Sir Thomas Bertram (speaker), Fanny Price, Mrs. Norris
Page Number: 6
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 5 Quotes

Manners as well as appearance are…so totally different…A girl not out has always the same sort of dress: a close bonnet, for instance; looks very demure, and never says a word… The most objectionable part is, that the alteration of manners on being introduced into company is frequently too sudden. They sometimes pass in such very little time from reserve to quite the opposite— to confidence!

Related Characters: Mary Crawford (speaker), Fanny Price, Edmund Bertram, Tom Bertram
Page Number: 33
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 6 Quotes

What strange creatures brothers are! You would not write to each other but upon the most urgent necessity in the world; and when obliged to take up the pen…it is done in the fewest possible words. You have but one style among you…‘Dear Mary, I am just arrived. Bath seems full, and everything as usual. Yours sincerely.’ That is the true manly style; that is a complete brother’s letter.

Related Characters: Mary Crawford (speaker), Fanny Price, Henry Crawford
Page Number: 40
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 10 Quotes

“Your prospects…are too fair to justify want of spirits. You have a very smiling scene before you.”
“Do you mean literally or figuratively? Literally, I conclude. Yes, certainly, the sun shines, and the park looks very cheerful. But unluckily that iron gate, that ha-ha, give me a feeling of restraint and hardship. ‘I cannot get out,’ as the starling said.”

Related Characters: Maria Bertram (speaker), Henry Crawford (speaker), Fanny Price, Mr. Rushworth
Related Symbols: The Gate at Sotherton
Page Number: 67-68
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 15 Quotes

“I am quite ashamed of you, Fanny, to make such a difficulty of obliging your cousins in a trifle of this sort— so kind as they are to you! Take the part with a good grace, and let us hear no more of the matter, I entreat.”
“Do not urge her, madam,” said Edmund…
“I am not going to urge her,” replied Mrs. Norris sharply; “but I shall think her a very obstinate, ungrateful girl, if she does not do what her aunt and cousins wish her— very ungrateful, indeed, considering who and what she is.”

Related Characters: Mrs. Norris (speaker), Edmund Bertram (speaker), Fanny Price
Page Number: 100
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 17 Quotes

Fanny saw and pitied much of this in Julia; but there was no outward fellowship between them. Julia made no communication, and Fanny took no liberties. They were two solitary sufferers, or connected only by Fanny’s consciousness.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Julia Bertram
Page Number: 111
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 22 Quotes

“I am so glad your eldest cousin is gone that he may be Mr. Bertram again. There is something in the sound of Mr. Edmund Bertram so formal, so pitiful, so younger-brother-like, that I detest it.”
“How differently we feel!” cried Fanny. “To me, the sound of Mr. Bertram is so cold and nothing-meaning–so entirely without warmth or character!–It just stands for a gentleman, and that’s all.”

Related Characters: Fanny Price (speaker), Mary Crawford (speaker), Edmund Bertram
Page Number: 142
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 27 Quotes

Two lines more prized had never fallen from the pen of the most distinguished author— never more completely blessed the researches of the fondest biographer. The enthusiasm of a woman’s love is even beyond the biographer’s. To her, the handwriting itself, independent of anything it may convey, is a blessedness. Never were such characters cut by any other human being as Edmund’s commonest handwriting gave! This specimen, written in haste as it was, had not a fault; and there was a felicity in the flow of the first four words, in the arrangement of “My very dear Fanny,” which she could have looked at for ever.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Edmund Bertram
Related Symbols: Gold Chains
Page Number: 179
Explanation and Analysis:

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Yes, that uncle and aunt! They have injured the finest mind; for sometimes, Fanny, I own to you, it does appear more than manner: it appears as if the mind itself was tainted.

Related Characters: Fanny Price (speaker), Edmund Bertram (speaker), Mary Crawford, The Admiral
Page Number: 182
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 28 Quotes

Having…a general prevailing desire of recommending herself to [Sir Thomas], [Mary] took an opportunity of stepping aside to say something agreeable of Fanny.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Sir Thomas Bertram, Mary Crawford
Page Number: 187-188
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 31 Quotes

She took the letters as he gave them. The first was from the Admiral to inform his nephew…of his having succeeded in the object he had undertaken, the promotion of young Price…Sir Charles was much delighted in having such an opportunity of proving his regard for Admiral Crawford, and…William Price’s commission as second Lieutenant of H.M. sloop Thrush… was spreading joy through a wide circle of great people.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, William Price, Henry Crawford, The Admiral
Page Number: 202-203
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 34 Quotes

His reading was capital, and her pleasure in good reading extreme. To good reading, however, she had been long used; her uncle read well— her cousins all—Edmund very well; but in Mr. Crawford’s reading there was a variety of excellence beyond what she had ever met with…His acting had first taught Fanny what pleasure a play might give, and his reading brought all his acting before her again.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Edmund Bertram, Henry Crawford
Page Number: 228
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 35 Quotes

I should have thought…that every woman must have felt the possibility of a man’s not being approved, not being loved by some one of her sex, at least, let him be every so generally agreeable. Let him have all the perfections in the world, I think it ought not be set down as certain, that a man must be acceptable to every woman he may happen to like himself.

Related Characters: Fanny Price (speaker), Edmund Bertram, Henry Crawford
Page Number: 239
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 38 Quotes

Fanny was in the narrow entrance-passage of the house, and in her mother’s arms, who met her there with looks of true kindness, and with features which Fanny loved the more, because they brought her aunt Bertram’s before her, and there were her two sisters…both glad to see her in their way, though with no advantage of manner in receiving her. But manner Fanny did not want. Would they but love her, she should be satisfied.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Mrs. Frances Price
Page Number: 256
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 39 Quotes

She could think of nothing but Mansfield…Every thing where she now was in full contrast to it. The elegance, propriety, regularity, harmony, and perhaps, above all, the peace and tranquillity of Mansfield, were brought to her remembrance every hour of the day, by the prevalence of everything opposite to them here… If tenderness could be ever supposed wanting, good sense and good breeding supplied its place…Here everybody was noisy, every voice was loud…The doors were in constant banging, the stairs were never at rest, nothing was done without a clatter, nobody sat still, and nobody could command attention when they spoke.

Related Characters: Fanny Price
Page Number: 266
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 42 Quotes

We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.

Related Characters: Fanny Price (speaker), Henry Crawford
Page Number: 280
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 46 Quotes

She dared not indulge in the hope of the paragraph being false. Miss Crawford’s letter, which she had read so often as to make every line her own, was in frightful conformity with it. Her eager defence of her brother, her hope of its being hushed up, her evident agitation, were all of a piece with something very bad; and if there was a woman of character in existence, who could treat as a trifle this sin of the first magnitude, who could try to gloss it over, and desire to have it unpunished, she could believe Miss Crawford to be the woman!

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Henry Crawford, Mary Crawford
Page Number: 299
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 48 Quotes

I purposefully abstain from dates on this occasion, that every one may be at liberty to fix their own, aware that the cure of unconquerable passions, and the transfer of unchanging attachments, must vary much as to time in different people. I only entreat everybody to believe that exactly at the time when it was quite natural that it should be so, and not a week earlier, Edmund did cease to care about Miss Crawford, and became as anxious to marry Fanny as Fanny herself could desire.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Edmund Bertram, Mary Crawford
Page Number: 319-321
Explanation and Analysis:

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In [Susan’s] usefulness, in Fanny’s excellence, in William’s continued good conduct and rising fame, and in the general well-doing and success of the other members of the family…Sir Thomas saw repeated, and forever repeated reason to rejoice in what he had done for them all, and acknowledge the advantages of early hardship and discipline, and the consciousness of being born to struggle and endure.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, William Price, Sir Thomas Bertram, Susan Price
Page Number: 321
Explanation and Analysis:

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Fanny Price Character Timeline in Mansfield Park

The timeline below shows where the character Fanny Price appears in Mansfield Park. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Letters and Character Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
...Mrs. Price the next day, and arranges to have her servant, Nanny, fetch the daughter: Fanny Price. Mrs. Price accepts the offer and attests to her daughter’s good graces, writing that... (full context)
Chapter 2
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
The child, named Fanny like her mother, travels safely to Mansfield Park (the home of the Bertrams). The narrator... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Fanny meets the Bertram children: two teenaged sons, Edmund and Tom, aged sixteen and seventeen, and... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Fanny, who is frightened, homesick, and tired, is quiet and avoids eye contact. Mrs. Norris scolds... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
The following day, Julia and Maria are perplexed by Fanny’s lack of knowledge of French, her limited amount of clothing, and other differences that arise... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Letters and Character Theme Icon
After one week of Fanny’s severe discomfort, her cousin Edmund finds her crying on the stairs. Edmund consoles Fanny, and... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Fanny begins to feel more comfortable in her new home and with her new companions. She... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Sir Thomas and Mrs. Norris are satisfied with their scheme to adopt Fanny. However, Fanny’s education is somewhat difficult, because she is so far behind her cousins. The... (full context)
Letters and Character Theme Icon
...“spent her days in sitting, nicely dressed, on a sofa.” Lady Bertram expresses sympathy for Fanny, however—she likes her because Fanny fetches her letters. (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...before William, now a sailor, sets out on a journey. William’s new career path worries Fanny, but Edmund sets her mind at ease by telling stories of sailing adventures. (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Edmund continues to be especially kind to Fanny. He gives her attention and books that she loves. Because of his affection toward her,... (full context)
Chapter 3
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Mr. Norris dies when Fanny is fifteen, and, as a result, Mrs. Norris moves to a smaller house. She is... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Now that Mr. Norris is dead, Sir Thomas expects that Mrs. Norris will take Fanny into her household, desiring company. Lady Bertram, hearing Sir Thomas’s musings, tells Fanny. Fanny finds... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Ultimately, Fanny’s fears turn out to be unnecessary, because Mrs. Norris intends to do everything she can... (full context)
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...his children that she saves an inheritance, and is content to continue hosting his niece. Fanny learns that plans to move her to the White House are off, much to her... (full context)
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Fanny, likewise, is happy that Sir Thomas is leaving, but feels bad about then. Then Sir... (full context)
Chapter 4
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...a great interest in the girls’ social engagements, Lady Bertram is too lazy to socialize. Fanny stays in and keeps Lady Bertram company when the other girls go out. She loves... (full context)
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Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
In the spring, Fanny’s beloved pony dies. As a result, Fanny feels her health suffering from lack of exercise.... (full context)
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Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
When Edmund returns to Mansfield and sees that Fanny has no opportunities to ride, he insists that Fanny get a horse. Mrs. Norris, ever... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...that point, and so he exchanges one of his own horses for one suitable for Fanny, and lets Fanny use it whenever she wants. Fanny is thrilled and extremely touched by... (full context)
Chapter 5
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Mary is puzzled by Fanny’s reserve and lack of interest in Henry, commenting to Tom and Edmund that she does... (full context)
Chapter 6
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...the grounds at Sotherton, comparing them to other estates in the area. As they talk, Fanny tells Edmund she wishes she could see Sotherton before Mr. Rushworth makes the improvements. Edmund,... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Edmund says that the harp is his favorite instrument, and Fanny says that she has never heard the harp, but would like to very much. Mary... (full context)
Letters and Character Theme Icon
...that there is a “manly” style to writing these letters that is curt and unemotional. Fanny, who has a long, fulfilling correspondence with William, pushes back on this idea, and Edmund... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Mary asks questions about William, making Fanny uncomfortable. Mary and Edmund discuss the navy men they know. Mary, having lived with her... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...go, saying they can either dine at Sotherton or back at Mansfield Park afterward, and Fanny will stay home with Lady Bertram. Everyone agrees except Edmund, who is quiet. (full context)
Chapter 7
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
The next day, Edmund asks Fanny what she thinks of Mary. Fanny says she enjoys Mary’s engaging way of speaking and... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...totally in love. Mary, who previous was uninterested in Edmund, begins to find him intriguing. Fanny is surprised by Edmund’s tolerance of Mary’s company more generally, despite the faults they already... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...attention towards Mary becomes especially hurtful when he starts using the mare he acquired for Fanny to teach Mary to ride. The first time, this does not bother Fanny, nor does... (full context)
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Fanny, afraid of being noticed by the party and seeming impatient for her turn, walks over... (full context)
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Fanny is lifted on to her horse and starts her ride, watching with sadness as the... (full context)
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As everyone goes to bed that night, Edmund asks Fanny if she plans on riding tomorrow, because he would like to take Mary to the... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...the atmosphere of the drawing room, clouded by Maria’s bad mood, is sullen. Edmund finds Fanny lying on the sofa at the other end of the room. Mrs. Norris then scolds... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mrs. Norris explains that Fanny went out to cut roses for Lady Bertram while Lady Bertram sat outside, and she... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...she makes the same walk all the time. Edmund responds by pointing out that, unlike Fanny, Mrs. Norris is in good health. Mrs. Norris then points out that Fanny would be... (full context)
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Edmund does not respond to these comments, and instead brings Fanny a glass of wine. Fanny has started to cry. Edmund is annoyed at his mother... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Fanny goes to bed, and though she has been feeling very sad and her head hurts,... (full context)
Chapter 8
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Fanny begins riding again the next morning. While she is out, Mr. Rushworth and his mother... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...overwhelming for Lady Bertram. She tells her that Lady Bertram will stay home and that Fanny will keep her company, while Edmund will join them at Sotherton. Mrs. Rushworth concedes Lady... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...that, since there is so much room in the carriage they chose, they should take Fanny with them. Edmund asks if Lady Bertram would let Fanny go to Sotherton if she... (full context)
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Edmund offers to stay at home in Fanny’s place, prompting an outcry from the others. Mrs. Norris objects that she has already told... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
During the carriage ride, Fanny admires the scenery and looks forward to talking about it with Edmund, who is riding... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Mary, bragging about his property. Mrs. Norris also delights in Mr. Rushworth’s wealth, and even Fanny compliments it. Maria is giddy with pride as they pull up to the house. (full context)
Chapter 9
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...furniture. Mary, who is used to these kinds of houses, is not especially impressed, but Fanny thinks it is breathtaking, and listens attentively to Mrs. Rushworth’s explanations. (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
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...a day before the practice was discontinued. Mary jokes that “every generation has its improvements.” Fanny exclaims that she thinks it’s a shame that the family no longer gathers for daily... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...daughters bored at church, with an unattractive chaplain, and thinking only of men. Edmund and Fanny do not respond to her right away. Fanny is extremely angry, but Edmund collects himself... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...then. Mary, who did not realize that Edmund intended to join the clergy, looks aghast. Fanny feels bad for her, since Mary just said so many flippant things about religion. Mary... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Henry heading to the terrace first, then Maria, and Mr. Rushworth following. Edmund, Mary, and Fanny show up close to the gate, sticking together in a group. Lastly, Mrs. Rushworth, Mrs.... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mary, Edmund, and Fanny go into the woods, where the temperature will be cooler. Mary brings up Edmund’s choice... (full context)
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
...know how the clergyman acts in his daily life, so he can lead by example. Fanny agrees. Mary, however, thinks Edmund should go into law instead. (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
They are quiet for a while. Fanny breaks the silence by saying she would like to sit down for a while. Edmund... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
The trio arrives at a bench and they all sit down. Edmund observes that Fanny is very tired. Fanny says she will soon be rested, but Mary gets up and... (full context)
Chapter 10
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Twenty minutes go by and Fanny is still sitting on the bench, surprised to be left for so long. Maria, Mr.... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Maria agrees. Henry says that even if they are out of sight before he returns, Fanny can tell him where they’ve gone. Fanny protests that Maria will hurt herself climbing the... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Fanny, alone again, is annoyed that Henry and Maria would do something so bold. She thinks... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Fanny suggests that Julia should wait for Mr. Rushworth to arrive with the key, but Julia... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Five minutes after Julia leaves, Mr. Rushworth shows up, and when Fanny explains that the others have not waited for him, he is upset. He stands before... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Mr. Rushworth asks Fanny if she likes Henry as much as everyone else seems to, saying that he does... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Fanny turns her thoughts back to Mary and Edmund, and decides to go look for them.... (full context)
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Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
As they drive away, Mrs. Norris comments that it was a good day for Fanny, and that she expects her to be grateful as a result. Maria makes a snarky... (full context)
Chapter 11
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mary, Edmund, and Fanny engage in a long discussion of Edmund’s choice to be a clergyman, after Mary suggests... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Julia then invite Mary to play instruments with them, and so she leaves Edmund and Fanny. As she walks away, Edmund articulates lots of admiring thoughts about Mary’s good nature to... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Fanny looks out the window, and says to Edmund that she thinks people would be happier... (full context)
Chapter 12
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Fanny, however, continues to dislike Henry. She tries to hint at her feelings to Edmund, but... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Fanny overhears Mrs. Rushworth and Mrs. Norris discussing Julia and Henry one night at a ball,... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Tom appears. Fanny hopes he will ask her to dance, but instead he pulls up a chair to... (full context)
Chapter 13
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Fanny, who overheard the quibble, tries to comfort Edmund by suggesting that they may not find... (full context)
Chapter 14
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...They vet various options, but find all of them imperfect for one reason or another. Fanny, meanwhile, listens and observes these discussions. She finds the objections to various plays petty, but... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...the comedic part of Amelia. Julia then leaves the room, making everyone else feel awkward. Fanny feels bad for Julia and pities her feelings of jealousy. (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...go to the Parsonage to tell Mary she has been cast as Amelia, and suddenly Fanny is alone. She picks up the play script, which is on the table, and reads.... (full context)
Chapter 15
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Agatha and Mary is Amelia. Edmund turns to sit near Mrs. Norris, Lady Bertram, and Fanny at the fire. Mr. Rushworth tells him that he has forty-two speeches in the play,... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...Bertram, who seems to not care very much, tells Maria to be proper and tells Fanny to order her dinner. Edmund tells Lady Bertram that Sir Thomas would not like Maria... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...is sure that Lady Bertram is tired of all their discussion, along with Mrs. Norris, Fanny, and Edmund. Lady Bertram says something pleasant in response, but Edmund says nothing. (full context)
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Mary returns to Lady Bertram, Fanny, and Edmund, and asks Edmund what he thinks they should do about Anhalt. Edmund suggests... (full context)
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Tom tells Fanny that they need her to play the Cottager’s Wife. Fanny is shocked and says she... (full context)
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Mary moves her chair over towards Fanny’s and tries to soothe her, giving the others a look to indicate that they should... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Meanwhile, the others continue discussing the play. Eventually, Tom calls Mary away from Fanny to discuss the problematic lack of an Anhalt. Tom proposes finding someone from the surrounding... (full context)
Chapter 16
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
When Fanny wakes up the next morning, she is still unhappy about everything that happened the previous... (full context)
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In the East Room, there is no fire in the grate, but Fanny still spends her time there, since she can go there to be alone and read... (full context)
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Edmund knocks on the door and enters the room, asking Fanny for her opinion. He tells her that the theatre scheme is even worse now that... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Edmund mentions how kind Mary was to Fanny the night before. Fanny agrees, but not enthusiastically. He tells Fanny he will leave her... (full context)
Chapter 17
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Mary is likewise happy that Edmund will be playing her love interest. Fanny learns that Mrs. Grant has offered to play the Cottager’s Wife at Mary’s suggestion, so... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...love with her. She is angry at Maria, with whom she is normally very close. Fanny feels bad for Julia because of this messy situation, but they do not discuss the... (full context)
Chapter 18
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...play, with no shortage of mishaps. They are frustrated with each other and complain often. Fanny enjoys the goings-on, and likes to slip into the theatre to watch their rehearsals. She... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Fanny helps Mrs. Norris with the needlework as well, and Mrs. Norris, as usual, criticizes her... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
The next day, the day of the three-act rehearsal, Fanny is sitting in the East Room when there is a knock at her door and... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
No longer having an excuse to use Fanny instead of each other, Edmund and Mary practice together while Fanny prompts them if they... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...are all disappointed, as this means they cannot rehearse. Several people, including Edmund, suggest that Fanny should read the part instead. Fanny hesitates, but finally agrees—when suddenly Julia announces that Sir... (full context)
Chapter 19
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...sudden arrival. Julia, Edmund, Tom, Maria, and Mr. Rushworth go to meet their father, while Fanny stays with the guests. The Crawfords soon leave, but Mr. Yates sticks around. (full context)
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Fanny goes to greet her uncle once the Crawfords leave. Sir Thomas greets her much more... (full context)
Chapter 20
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...father about the play debacle, apologize, and say they are all at fault except for Fanny. Sir Thomas accepts his apology. Sir Thomas is, however extremely vexed that Mrs. Norris allowed... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...is happy when he leaves, now bitter about the love triangle in which she “lost.” Fanny is also happy to hear that Henry is gone. (full context)
Chapter 21
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
...Grants, and says that he thinks Sir Thomas would like Mary if he knew her. Fanny disagrees. (full context)
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Fanny says she doesn’t mind the quiet evenings, and then self-deprecatingly suggests that it is because... (full context)
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Fanny mentions the fact that Edmund, Tom, and Sir Thomas are going to eat at Sotherton... (full context)
Chapter 22
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Fanny, now the only young woman in the house, becomes more sought after company for her... (full context)
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Fanny goes to the Parsonage every few days, often walking with Mary in Mrs. Grant’s garden,... (full context)
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...and discussing Mr. Rushworth and Maria’s marriage when Edmund appears with Mrs. Grant. Mary tells Fanny she is glad that Tom is gone so she can call Edmund “Mr. Bertram” again,... (full context)
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The flirtation between Mary and Edmund distracts Fanny, and she resolves to leave. They all go back into the Parsonage, where they find... (full context)
Chapter 23
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Back at the house, Lady Bertram asks why Mrs. Grant has invited Fanny. They discuss the fact that Sir Thomas will keep Lady Bertram company. When Sir Thomas... (full context)
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Fanny is very glad, but also worries about the pain of having to watch the flirtation... (full context)
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Mrs. Norris adds that, if it rains that night, Fanny should not expect them to send the carriage for her. Sir Thomas, however, sends Fanny... (full context)
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In the carriage, Edmund compliments Fanny’s appearance. When they pass the stable yard of the Parsonage, Edmund spots Henry’s barouche, and... (full context)
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At dinner, conversation flows easily, so Fanny can sit back and relax without having to say too much. The men discuss hunting... (full context)
Chapter 24
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...in Mansfield for two weeks. Henry tells Mary that he intends to try to seduce Fanny for fun, and Mary says that it is only because he has no one else... (full context)
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Letters and Character Theme Icon
As Henry flirts with Fanny, Fanny does not forget what Henry did to Maria and Julia, but feels his charms... (full context)
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William comes to Mansfield to see Fanny, and they are both extremely happy to be reunited. Their conversation is at first awkward... (full context)
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Henry is struck by the intimacy that William and Fanny share, and by how much he likes William. Henry also begins to genuinely admire Fanny,... (full context)
Chapter 25
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...Even Sir Thomas opens up to the Grants. He notices, also, Henry’s increasing attention to Fanny. One night, Sir Thomas goes so far as to accept an invitation to dine at... (full context)
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...Lady Bertram, who is in the game, cannot make decisions by herself, and so asks Fanny. Fanny does not know how to play either, and so Henry offers to teach them... (full context)
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As Henry directs Fanny in playing her hand, he asks her if she has ever seen Thornton Lacey, and... (full context)
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Sir Thomas continues to notice Henry’s attention to Fanny. Henry tells them of his plans to rent a house near Mansfield that winter, and... (full context)
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Mary and Fanny have been listening to the conversation. Fanny laments that soon Edmund will move and she... (full context)
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The group moves to sit around the fire, except for William and Fanny, who stay at the card table while Henry watches them from the hearth. The siblings... (full context)
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William tells Fanny he would like to see her dance at a ball, and asks Sir Thomas, who... (full context)
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...Norris. As they are leaving, Henry seizes the shawl Edmund was about to put around Fanny’s shoulders and does so in his place. (full context)
Chapter 26
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Sir Thomas, inspired by William’s comment that he has never seen Fanny dance, decides to throw a ball before William leaves. Mrs. Norris suggests instead a ball... (full context)
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Fanny worries over her dress. William has bought her a cross that she would like to... (full context)
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The day before the ball, Fanny decides to go to the Parsonage to consult Mrs. Grant and Mary about her dress.... (full context)
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Mary, however, insists, and Fanny at last chooses the gold chain that she thinks is the plainest and least expensive.... (full context)
Chapter 27
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Fanny returns home to put the necklace in her box in the East Room, where she... (full context)
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Fanny then tells Edmund that Mary has just gifted her a gold chain, and she asks... (full context)
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Fanny is unsure of whether to be happy or sad that she is one of Edmund’s... (full context)
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Fanny is excited but nervous for the ball, which will be Fanny’s first big debut. She... (full context)
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Fanny, now alone and dressing for the ball, is thrilled about Edmund’s bad news which, along... (full context)
Chapter 28
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Fanny arrives in the drawing room, where everyone is waiting for the guests to arrive. Everyone... (full context)
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The guest’s carriages begin to pull up to the house. Fanny finds herself being introduced and making small talk. The Grants and the Crawfords arrive. Fanny... (full context)
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As everyone moves into the ballroom, Fanny ends up near Mary, and explains to her that she is not wearing her chain... (full context)
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Sir Thomas tells Fanny that she and Henry are to open the ball, much to Fanny’s surprise and happiness.... (full context)
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When Mary tries to endear herself to Fanny, however, she missteps by trying to suggest Henry’s interest in Fanny, only to embarrass and... (full context)
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After dancing with Edmund, Fanny is out of breath and must sit down. William, Henry, and Sir Thomas keep her... (full context)
Chapter 29
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Fanny sees William off in the morning and cries afterward. Edmund also leaves for his ordainment... (full context)
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The next day, Fanny is in better spirits. She enjoyably discusses the ball with Mrs. Grant and Mary. The... (full context)
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Fanny and Mary experience Edmund’s absence differently. Fanny is relieved by it, but it makes Mary... (full context)
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Mary and Fanny discuss Edmund’s absence, and Mary asks if she has any news of when he will... (full context)
Chapter 30
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Henry returns to the Parsonage from London. Henry tells Mary that he wants to marry Fanny, to Mary’s complete surprise. Mary says Fanny is very lucky, and that she approves of... (full context)
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They then discuss all of Fanny’s charms and virtues. Mary comments that Henry’s cruel project of trying to make Fanny fall... (full context)
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...Admiral, and Henry tells her not to let her negative opinion of the Admiral influence Fanny’s. Mary tells Henry that she has no worries about how Henry will treat Fanny, despite... (full context)
Chapter 31
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Henry goes to Mansfield Park the next morning. Lady Bertram leaves Fanny alone with Henry. Henry announces to Fanny that William has been made a lieutenant, thanks... (full context)
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Fanny is then about to leave to tell Sir Thomas when Henry stops her, and tells... (full context)
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Fanny goes to the East Room and thinks over the events that just occurred, from William’s... (full context)
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At dinner, Henry gives Fanny a note from Mary, which Fanny opens and reads immediately. The note expresses Mary’s approval... (full context)
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...thoughts are money-focused as usual, and Lady Bertram self-centered and flighty as usual as well. Fanny, meanwhile, continues to ponder Henry’s declaration and Mary’s note. She debates the possibility that Henry’s... (full context)
Chapter 32
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The next morning, Fanny has not forgotten the previous day’s events, and she wishes Henry would go away and... (full context)
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Sir Thomas then tells Fanny that Henry came to talk to him about his love for her, and that Henry... (full context)
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Sir Thomas presses Fanny about why she does not like Henry, and Fanny wants to tell him about how... (full context)
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Sir Thomas returns a half hour later to tell Fanny that Henry is gone. Sir Thomas promises not to tell anyone want happened, and tells... (full context)
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When Fanny sees Mrs. Norris at dinner, Mrs. Norris criticizes her for not telling her she was... (full context)
Chapter 33
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Henry reiterates his passionate love for Fanny, saying he will never give up. Fanny repeats that she does not and cannot love... (full context)
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...their meeting. He meets with Henry, who is disappointed but certain he will eventually win Fanny over. Sir Thomas totally supports Henry in his efforts, and they leave each other on... (full context)
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Sir Thomas tells Fanny that he spoke with Henry, and thinks he is an exceptional man. Fanny begins to... (full context)
Chapter 34
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...to dinner. Later that night, Edmund and Henry walk into the drawing room to find Fanny reading Shakespeare aloud to Lady Bertram. Henry takes up the book and begins to read,... (full context)
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...at his estate, and Henry replies that there will be no theatre there, implying that Fanny, as its mistress, would not allow it. They move on to discussing Edmund’s preaching, the... (full context)
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...comments that he could only preach once or twice a season rather than every Sunday, Fanny shakes her head, and he privately implores her to tell him what she means. Fanny... (full context)
Chapter 35
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...for London, and Sir Thomas determines to try once more to help Henry win over Fanny before he goes. Edmund, who had intended to let Fanny bring up the matter if... (full context)
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Edmund asks Fanny if she is the only one who will not tell him about Henry’s proposal, upsetting... (full context)
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Edmund goes on to tell Fanny, however, that she should try to let Henry succeed in winning her over. When Fanny... (full context)
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Edmund then describes his conversation with Mary about Henry’s affection for Fanny, saying that Mary loves Fanny and approves of the match. Fanny notes that she has... (full context)
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Edmund, recognizing this, changes the subject, telling Fanny that the Crawfords are leaving Mansfield on Monday, and that Edmund almost missed seeing them.... (full context)
Chapter 36
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Edmund and Sir Thomas discuss Fanny and Henry once again, with both agreeing that Fanny will be convinced to love Henry... (full context)
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...practicing their lines, and she reminisces about the play. Mary then collects herself and tells Fanny that she had intended to express her anger, but that she didn’t have the heart... (full context)
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Fanny then says that Mary should not be sad, since Mary is going to stay with... (full context)
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Mary tries many tactics to convince Fanny of the authenticity of Henry’s affection, starting by pointing out his attention to her at... (full context)
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The two hug. Mary asks Fanny to write her letters and to look after Mrs. Grant. Fanny agrees, though not too... (full context)
Chapter 37
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Sir Thomas looks out for signs that Fanny seems sad that Henry is gone. He asks Edmund to look as well, but Edmund... (full context)
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William, who has a leave of absence, heads to Mansfield to spend time with Fanny. Sir Thomas wishes to organize for Fanny to return with William to Portsmouth after his... (full context)
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...one hang-up in the plan is concern that Lady Bertram, who is so dependent on Fanny, will not be able to function without her. Sir Thomas, however, tells Lady Bertram that... (full context)
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Fanny then writes to her family, asking to come stay with them. Mrs. Price responds kindly... (full context)
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...on the trip as well, to see her supposedly beloved sister, much to William and Fanny’s horror. Ultimately, though, she decides against it, not wanting to pay for her own trip... (full context)
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...to London, delays his trip and stays home to keep his parents company. He tells Fanny that he intends to propose to Mary when he finally gets to London. He tells... (full context)
Chapter 38
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Fanny and William enjoy their travels together, talking and laughing. They do not discuss Henry’s proposal,... (full context)
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Fanny and William stay overnight in Newbury, and then set off again the next day. They... (full context)
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No tea materializes, but two of Fanny’s brothers, Tom (Price) and Charles, do. They greet her and then return to causing a... (full context)
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William emerges from another room wearing his lieutenant costume, and Fanny hugs him and cries that she is so proud. All day long people come and... (full context)
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Fanny looks at Betsey, and remembers another one of her sisters, Mary Price, who died after... (full context)
Chapter 39
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Fanny’s first week at the Price home in Portsmouth ends up being disappointing. She does not... (full context)
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Fanny is hurt by this total lack of interest on her mother’s part, but still tries... (full context)
Chapter 40
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Fanny receives Mary’s next letter, which arrives later than the previous ones, and she reads it... (full context)
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In Portsmouth, Fanny fails to attach herself to her mother and father’s social circle because she carries herself... (full context)
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Fanny decides to buy a silver knife for Betsey so that she will stop stealing the... (full context)
Chapter 41
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After Edmund has been in London for a week, Fanny still has not received a letter from him. She does, however, receive a visitor—one day,... (full context)
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Henry talks with Fanny’s mother as Fanny recovers from the shock of his appearance. Once Fanny is a little... (full context)
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Henry tells Fanny he came to Portsmouth only for her, which Fanny is not happy to hear. Despite... (full context)
Chapter 42
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...the family, all dressed in their Sunday best, for church. After the service, Henry and Fanny join Mrs. Price on her weekly walk around town. The weather is very good, and... (full context)
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They discuss the fact that Fanny has been in Portsmouth for one month, and intends to stay for two. They also... (full context)
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When their walk is over, Henry says goodbye to Fanny. He asks if she needs anything from London, and Fanny tells him to send her... (full context)
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Fanny eats her unappealing dinner, and then spends the rest of the day sad that Henry... (full context)
Chapter 43
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Henry travels back to London the next day, and a few days later Fanny receives a letter from Mary saying that Henry told her of his visit. Mary then... (full context)
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Fanny is gratified to learn that Edmund has not yet proposed to Mary, but dislikes that... (full context)
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In the days following, Fanny waits for a letter from Edmund, but receives none. Eventually she gives up waiting and... (full context)
Chapter 44
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At last, Edmund’s long-awaited letter arrives. Fanny reads it warily, afraid it will carry the news that he and Mary are engaged.... (full context)
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Edmund then tells Fanny about seeing Henry and Maria interact at a recent party. He describes the coolness between... (full context)
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A few days later, Fanny receives a letter from Lady Bertram. She tells her that Tom has fallen gravely ill... (full context)
Chapter 45
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By the end of the week, Fanny receives news from Lady Bertram that Tom’s fever breaks, but that the doctors continue to... (full context)
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As Fanny’s time at Portsmouth reaches three months, she longs to be taken back to Mansfield and... (full context)
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After a long silence, Fanny receives a letter from Mary, saying that she hears that Tom may be dying, and... (full context)
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Mary’s unsavory hope that Tom will die disgusts Fanny. Likewise, she is skeptical of Henry’s relationship with Maria, which she suspects is a flirtation.... (full context)
Chapter 46
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Fanny receives another letter from Mary over a week later. Mary writes to tell Fanny that... (full context)
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Having heard no such rumor, Fanny is confused and concerned. She is surprised by the implication that Henry has done something... (full context)
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Mr. Price, who is reading the newspaper, asks Fanny if one of the society page articles is referring to her cousin. Fanny reads the... (full context)
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Two days later Fanny receives a letter from Edmund, confirming that they do not know where Maria and Henry... (full context)
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Fanny is thrilled to be soon leaving Portsmouth and to take Susan with her. She is... (full context)
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...The family matters weigh heavily on him, and he is also distressed by how ill Fanny looks after months of being in Portsmouth. Susan enjoys looking out the window. They arrive... (full context)
Chapter 47
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...general disruption in the house due to Tom’s illness. Naturally, she is also furious that Fanny is back, and even less happy to see Susan. (full context)
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Fanny consoles and supports Lady Bertram, who tells her exactly what happened between Maria and Henry,... (full context)
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Edmund does not speak to Fanny until five days after she arrives in Mansfield. Edmund tells Fanny that he went to... (full context)
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Edmund is so disgusted by Mary blaming Fanny, and her focus on the detection of the affair and covering it up rather than... (full context)
Chapter 48
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Fanny, back at Mansfield Park and totally certain that Edmund will never marry Mary, is very... (full context)
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...to Mansfield and the family wonders what exactly to do with her. Mrs. Norris blames Fanny for Maria’s downfall, an accusation that Sir Thomas rejects. Mrs. Norris and Maria move far... (full context)
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...Henry’s mistake, suggesting that, had Henry kept trying, he might have eventually succeeded in securing Fanny’s affections. After Maria’s coldness to him at a party, his vanity made him pursue Maria... (full context)
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Edmund, for his part, finally begins to notice Fanny, and falls in love with her. He begins to act romantically towards her, and Fanny... (full context)
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Lady Bertram is unhappy about the marriage because it means she will lose Fanny’s company, but Susan, who is thriving at Mansfield, takes Fanny’s place as Lady Bertram’s companion. (full context)
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Edmund and Fanny are extremely happy once they are married, and after Dr. Grant’s death they move into... (full context)