Mansfield Park

Mansfield Park

Mary Crawford Character Analysis

Mary Crawford is Henry Crawford’s sister and Mrs. Grant’s half-sister. She is very beautiful and very charming, but can sometimes transgress rules of propriety due to her lively way of thinking. Mary, who lived in London with her uncle the Admiral and his wife before moving to the Parsonage to live with Mrs. Grant, enjoys city life and sociability. Despite her love of London, her home there with the Admiral was tense, since the two of them do not get along well. Mary is ambitious and intends to marry advantageously, initially setting her sights on Tom. She ends up falling in love instead with Edmund, but cannot get over his profession as a clergyman and his small income. Ultimately, her romance with Edmund fails because of this difference and because of Mary’s support of her brother’s affair. Mary serves in Fanny’s life as both an occasional friend and a constant source of pain, due to Edmund’s affections for her.

Mary Crawford Quotes in Mansfield Park

The Mansfield Park quotes below are all either spoken by Mary Crawford or refer to Mary Crawford. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dover Publications edition of Mansfield Park published in 2001.
Chapter 5 Quotes

There is not one in a hundred of either sex who is not taken in when they marry…it is, of all transactions, the one in which people expect most from others, and are least honest themselves… it is a manoeuvring business. I know so many who have married in the full expectation and confidence of some one particular advantage in the connexion, or accomplishment, or good quality in the person, who have found themselves entirely deceived, and been obliged to put up with exactly the reverse.

Related Characters: Mary Crawford (speaker), Henry Crawford, Mrs. Grant
Page Number: 30-31
Explanation and Analysis:

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Manners as well as appearance are…so totally different…A girl not out has always the same sort of dress: a close bonnet, for instance; looks very demure, and never says a word… The most objectionable part is, that the alteration of manners on being introduced into company is frequently too sudden. They sometimes pass in such very little time from reserve to quite the opposite— to confidence!

Related Characters: Mary Crawford (speaker), Fanny Price, Edmund Bertram, Tom Bertram
Page Number: 33
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 6 Quotes

Guess my surprise, when I found that I had…offended all the farmers, all the labourers, all the hay in the parish…coming down with the true London maxim, that every thing is to be got with money, I was a little embarrassed at first by the sturdy independence of your country customs.

Related Characters: Mary Crawford (speaker), Edmund Bertram
Page Number: 51
Explanation and Analysis:

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What strange creatures brothers are! You would not write to each other but upon the most urgent necessity in the world; and when obliged to take up the pen…it is done in the fewest possible words. You have but one style among you…‘Dear Mary, I am just arrived. Bath seems full, and everything as usual. Yours sincerely.’ That is the true manly style; that is a complete brother’s letter.

Related Characters: Mary Crawford (speaker), Fanny Price, Henry Crawford
Page Number: 40
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 9 Quotes

“How can two sermons a week… do all that you speak of? govern the conduct and fashion the manners of a large congregation for the rest of the week? One scarcely sees a clergyman out of his pulpit.”
“You are speaking of London, I am speaking of the nation at large.”
“The metropolis, I imagine, is a pretty fair sample of the rest.”
“Not, I should hope, of the proportion of virtue to vice throughout the kingdom. We do not look in great cities for our best morality.”

Related Characters: Edmund Bertram (speaker), Mary Crawford (speaker)
Page Number: 63
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 22 Quotes

“I am so glad your eldest cousin is gone that he may be Mr. Bertram again. There is something in the sound of Mr. Edmund Bertram so formal, so pitiful, so younger-brother-like, that I detest it.”
“How differently we feel!” cried Fanny. “To me, the sound of Mr. Bertram is so cold and nothing-meaning–so entirely without warmth or character!–It just stands for a gentleman, and that’s all.”

Related Characters: Fanny Price (speaker), Mary Crawford (speaker), Edmund Bertram
Page Number: 142
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 27 Quotes

Yes, that uncle and aunt! They have injured the finest mind; for sometimes, Fanny, I own to you, it does appear more than manner: it appears as if the mind itself was tainted.

Related Characters: Fanny Price (speaker), Edmund Bertram (speaker), Mary Crawford, The Admiral
Page Number: 182
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 28 Quotes

Having…a general prevailing desire of recommending herself to [Sir Thomas], [Mary] took an opportunity of stepping aside to say something agreeable of Fanny.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Sir Thomas Bertram, Mary Crawford
Page Number: 187-188
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 46 Quotes

She dared not indulge in the hope of the paragraph being false. Miss Crawford’s letter, which she had read so often as to make every line her own, was in frightful conformity with it. Her eager defence of her brother, her hope of its being hushed up, her evident agitation, were all of a piece with something very bad; and if there was a woman of character in existence, who could treat as a trifle this sin of the first magnitude, who could try to gloss it over, and desire to have it unpunished, she could believe Miss Crawford to be the woman!

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Henry Crawford, Mary Crawford
Page Number: 299
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 48 Quotes

I purposefully abstain from dates on this occasion, that every one may be at liberty to fix their own, aware that the cure of unconquerable passions, and the transfer of unchanging attachments, must vary much as to time in different people. I only entreat everybody to believe that exactly at the time when it was quite natural that it should be so, and not a week earlier, Edmund did cease to care about Miss Crawford, and became as anxious to marry Fanny as Fanny herself could desire.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Edmund Bertram, Mary Crawford
Page Number: 319-321
Explanation and Analysis:

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Mary Crawford Character Timeline in Mansfield Park

The timeline below shows where the character Mary Crawford appears in Mansfield Park. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 4
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
In July, Mrs. Grant wealthy, charming, and attractive half siblings, Henry and Mary Crawford, come to stay with her. Henry and Mary previously lived with an uncle, the... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Mrs. Grant does, however, worry that Mary, who is used to the excitements of life in London, will be bored in the... (full context)
Chapter 5
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
After Henry and Mary dine with the Bertrams, Henry, Mrs. Grant, and Mary discuss the relative merits of each... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mary considers her romantic options in the Bertram brothers, deciding she prefers Tom, since he has... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Mary is puzzled by Fanny’s reserve and lack of interest in Henry, commenting to Tom and... (full context)
Chapter 6
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Tom leaves Mansfield. Mary anticipates that, with Edmund as the head of the household, their social events with the... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Mr. Rushworth visits Mansfield for the first time since Henry and Mary have arrived. Mr. Rushworth plans to renovate the grounds of his estate, Sotherton Court, and... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mary asks what style of building Sotherton is, and Edmund describes the house. Mary is impressed... (full context)
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Mary talks about her harp, which she is having sent to the Parsonage and arrives the... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...Fanny says that she has never heard the harp, but would like to very much. Mary offers to play for them. Mary tells Edmund to write to Tom and tell him... (full context)
Letters and Character Theme Icon
Edmund tells Mary has no plans to write to Tom soon. Mary then launches into a rant about... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Mary asks questions about William, making Fanny uncomfortable. Mary and Edmund discuss the navy men they... (full context)
Chapter 7
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
The next day, Edmund asks Fanny what she thinks of Mary. Fanny says she enjoys Mary’s engaging way of speaking and her beauty. Edmund agrees, but... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Edmund goes to the Parsonage daily once Mary’s harp arrives to listen to her play, and in doing so becomes more and more... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Edmund’s attention towards Mary becomes especially hurtful when he starts using the mare he acquired for Fanny to teach... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...party and seeming impatient for her turn, walks over and says hello to the party. Mary apologizes for keeping her waiting. Fanny responds politely and Mary dismounts and wishes Fanny a... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...watching with sadness as the group walks together to the village. The coachman comments that Mary is an exceedingly good horsewoman, comparing her to Fanny, which further annoys her. (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...Edmund asks Fanny if she plans on riding tomorrow, because he would like to take Mary to the Commons, a longer ride. Fanny says she is not. The next day, Mary,... (full context)
Chapter 8
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
While Mr. Rushworth is out, Mrs. Grant and Mary arrive at Mansfield. The Mansfield residents fill them in about the Sotherton plans. Mrs. Rushworth... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mrs. Rushworth goes on to invite Mary and Mrs. Grant to Sotherton. Mrs. Grant turns her down, but Mary accepts. Mr. Rushworth... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
...looks forward to talking about it with Edmund, who is riding his horse behind them. Mary, meanwhile, pays no attention to the environs. The narrator contrasts Fanny and Mary, who are... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Mr. Rushworth and perks up. She points out the land that Mr. Rushworth owns to Mary, bragging about his property. Mrs. Norris also delights in Mr. Rushworth’s wealth, and even Fanny... (full context)
Chapter 9
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...them through the rooms of the house, which is beautiful and full of luxurious furniture. Mary, who is used to these kinds of houses, is not especially impressed, but Fanny thinks... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...family used to gather there for prayer twice a day before the practice was discontinued. Mary jokes that “every generation has its improvements.” Fanny exclaims that she thinks it’s a shame... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Mary goes on to say she thinks it is better to leave religion to people’s private... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...she wishes Edmund were already a clergyman so that he could marry them right then. Mary, who did not realize that Edmund intended to join the clergy, looks aghast. Fanny feels... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...woods, with Henry heading to the terrace first, then Maria, and Mr. Rushworth following. Edmund, Mary, and Fanny show up close to the gate, sticking together in a group. Lastly, Mrs.... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mary, Edmund, and Fanny go into the woods, where the temperature will be cooler. Mary brings... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...is not his case, and asks if she thinks no one ever chooses the profession. Mary says that she would not use the word “never,” but that it’s not a very... (full context)
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Mary describes clergymen who give only one or two sermons a week and do little else.... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...feels bad for not thinking of her strength earlier, and he takes her arm and Mary’s. (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Edmund observes that Fanny is very tired. Fanny says she will soon be rested, but Mary gets up and wants to move, saying that resting tires her. She decides to go... (full context)
Chapter 10
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Maria, Mr. Rushworth, and Henry stumble upon her. Fanny explains her exhaustion and Edmund and Mary’s abandonment. Maria, Mr. Rushworth, and Henry sit down on the bench as well. They discuss... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...that Henry and Maria would do something so bold. She thinks sadly of Edmund and Mary, who seem to have forgotten her. Suddenly, Fanny hears footsteps, and Julia approaches, asking where... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Fanny turns her thoughts back to Mary and Edmund, and decides to go look for them. She finds them mid-laughter, having just... (full context)
Chapter 11
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mary, Edmund, and Fanny engage in a long discussion of Edmund’s choice to be a clergyman,... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Maria and Julia then invite Mary to play instruments with them, and so she leaves Edmund and Fanny. As she walks... (full context)
Chapter 12
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...intends to return to Mansfield in November, Tom comes back at the end of August. Mary, who used to enjoy hearing his stories of gambling and parties, realizes upon his return... (full context)
Chapter 13
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...As Edmund is trying to convince them, Henry enters the room, declaring that he and Mary will partake in the theatre as well. Edmund, now knowing that Mary approves of the... (full context)
Chapter 14
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...Maria, Henry, and Mr. Yates want the play to be a tragedy, while Tom and Mary prefer comedy. They vet various options, but find all of them imperfect for one reason... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...want to play Agatha, Frederick’s mother. Julia points out that there is no part for Mary. Henry tells them that Mary does not want to act, but rather help with the... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Julia by telling her to take the part of Amelia. Tom objects and says that Mary is better suited for the part. Henry, though, continues to implore Julia to take the... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...room, which is now the theatre. Maria and Henry go to the Parsonage to tell Mary she has been cast as Amelia, and suddenly Fanny is alone. She picks up the... (full context)
Chapter 15
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Maria returns home, reporting that Mary has accepted her part. Mr. Rushworth arrives at the house, and is offered either the... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...asks what roles the women are playing, and Maria tells him she is Agatha and Mary is Amelia. Edmund turns to sit near Mrs. Norris, Lady Bertram, and Fanny at the... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...Maria, and Mr. Yates go into the drawing room to study the play. Henry and Mary arrive. Mary compliments Lady Bertram on the play being finally chosen, saying she is sure... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Mary asks who is going to play Anhalt, who has not yet been cast. Mr. Rushworth... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Mary returns to Lady Bertram, Fanny, and Edmund, and asks Edmund what he thinks they should... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Mary moves her chair over towards Fanny’s and tries to soothe her, giving the others a... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Meanwhile, the others continue discussing the play. Eventually, Tom calls Mary away from Fanny to discuss the problematic lack of an Anhalt. Tom proposes finding someone... (full context)
Chapter 16
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...such a friendly relationship with someone like the lower class Anhalt actor, and how strange Mary must feel playing the love interest of a stranger. Fanny is sorry for Mary, but... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Edmund mentions how kind Mary was to Fanny the night before. Fanny agrees, but not enthusiastically. He tells Fanny he... (full context)
Chapter 17
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...together privately, saying that Edmund’s decision to act despite his scruples is pure jealousy over Mary. Toward Edmund, however, they do not rub it in. Mrs. Norris offers to make Edmund’s... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Mary is likewise happy that Edmund will be playing her love interest. Fanny learns that Mrs.... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
To Mary, Mrs. Grant wonders if Julia is in love with Henry, and Mary says she thinks... (full context)
Chapter 18
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...usual, criticizes her constantly. Fanny nervously awaits the three-act rehearsal, nervous about watching Edmund and Mary do their love scenes. She wonders if they have rehearsed it together yet. (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...is sitting in the East Room when there is a knock at her door and Mary enters. Mary asks Fanny if she will practice the love scenes with Edmund’s character with... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
No longer having an excuse to use Fanny instead of each other, Edmund and Mary practice together while Fanny prompts them if they forget their lines. Watching them perform the... (full context)
Chapter 21
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
...laments the exclusion of the Grants, and says that he thinks Sir Thomas would like Mary if he knew her. Fanny disagrees. (full context)
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
...and wishes she would talk more. Fanny is flattered. Edmund then proceeds to talk about Mary’s many virtues, frustrating Fanny. (full context)
Chapter 22
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...young woman in the house, becomes more sought after company for her family and for Mary, whom she begins visiting after being invited into their house one day when she is... (full context)
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Fanny goes to the Parsonage every few days, often walking with Mary in Mrs. Grant’s garden, where Fanny admires the nature. Mary, who is not a great... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...a bench and discussing Mr. Rushworth and Maria’s marriage when Edmund appears with Mrs. Grant. Mary tells Fanny she is glad that Tom is gone so she can call Edmund “Mr.... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mary and Edmund flirt, discussing the weather and debating whether it is warm out or not.... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
The flirtation between Mary and Edmund distracts Fanny, and she resolves to leave. They all go back into the... (full context)
Chapter 23
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...very glad, but also worries about the pain of having to watch the flirtation between Mary and Edmund. Mrs. Norris, as usual, tries to make Fanny feel like she does not... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Mary and Henry quietly discuss the fact that Edmund will be ordained soon, and talk about... (full context)
Chapter 24
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Henry decides to stay in Mansfield for two weeks. Henry tells Mary that he intends to try to seduce Fanny for fun, and Mary says that it... (full context)
Chapter 25
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Edmund both have ideas, but Edmund knows he will be constrained by his modest budget. Mary, focusing on the game to avoid thinking about Edmund’s lack of fortune, wins, and the... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...her if she has ever seen Thornton Lacey, and she replies that she has not. Mary suggests that Henry go out to Thornton Lacey with Edmund to give his opinion on... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Mary and Fanny have been listening to the conversation. Fanny laments that soon Edmund will move... (full context)
Chapter 26
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
...and the fact that he has decided for certain that he would like to marry Mary. He worries that Mary, who has expressed her dislike for his profession and the countryside,... (full context)
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...before the ball, Fanny decides to go to the Parsonage to consult Mrs. Grant and Mary about her dress. She runs into Mary outside and the two of them go up... (full context)
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Mary, however, insists, and Fanny at last chooses the gold chain that she thinks is the... (full context)
Chapter 27
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Fanny then tells Edmund that Mary has just gifted her a gold chain, and she asks Edmund’s advice as to whether... (full context)
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...sad that she is one of Edmund’s two dearest objects, considering that the other is Mary, and that this clearly means he intends to marry her. Fanny thinks Mary does not... (full context)
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...upset. He tells her that he has just come from the Parsonage, where he asked Mary for the first two dances. Mary agreed, but told Edmund it was the last time... (full context)
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Edmund goes on to say that he thinks Mary is naturally good, but has been ruined by her upbringing by the Admiral and his... (full context)
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...dine with him and the Admiral, puts her in good spirits. She tries to thread Mary’s chain through the cross, but it does not fit, and so she happily has an... (full context)
Chapter 28
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...introduced and making small talk. The Grants and the Crawfords arrive. Fanny watches Edmund and Mary’s interactions carefully. Henry approaches Fanny and asks her for the first two dances, relieving Fanny... (full context)
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As everyone moves into the ballroom, Fanny ends up near Mary, and explains to her that she is not wearing her chain because it did not... (full context)
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...slowly warms up. The company generally approves of Fanny, and she makes Sir Thomas proud. Mary, noticing Sir Thomas’s affection for Fanny, decides to say something about her to him. Mary... (full context)
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When Mary tries to endear herself to Fanny, however, she missteps by trying to suggest Henry’s interest... (full context)
Chapter 29
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...day, Fanny is in better spirits. She enjoyably discusses the ball with Mrs. Grant and Mary. The house is very quiet without the Bertram children and William, and Fanny expects that... (full context)
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Fanny and Mary experience Edmund’s absence differently. Fanny is relieved by it, but it makes Mary very sad.... (full context)
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Mary and Fanny discuss Edmund’s absence, and Mary asks if she has any news of when... (full context)
Chapter 30
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Henry returns to the Parsonage from London. Henry tells Mary that he wants to marry Fanny, to Mary’s complete surprise. Mary says Fanny is very... (full context)
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They then discuss all of Fanny’s charms and virtues. Mary comments that Henry’s cruel project of trying to make Fanny fall in love with him... (full context)
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Mary tells him that she was afraid that Henry was going to end up like the... (full context)
Chapter 31
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At dinner, Henry gives Fanny a note from Mary, which Fanny opens and reads immediately. The note expresses Mary’s approval of a match between... (full context)
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...self-centered and flighty as usual as well. Fanny, meanwhile, continues to ponder Henry’s declaration and Mary’s note. She debates the possibility that Henry’s love is authentic, flip-flopping and avoiding Henry all... (full context)
Chapter 32
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...not forgotten the previous day’s events, and she wishes Henry would go away and take Mary with him. She is surprised to find Henry at the house again that day, but... (full context)
Chapter 34
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When Edmund returns from his travels, he is surprised to run into Henry and Mary as he rides into town, especially since he extended his stay in an attempt to... (full context)
Chapter 35
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...and Julia during the play. Fanny senses, as Edmund talks, that his thoughts drift to Mary, who he has begun seeing again. When Edmund suggests that Fanny will be everything to... (full context)
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Edmund then describes his conversation with Mary about Henry’s affection for Fanny, saying that Mary loves Fanny and approves of the match.... (full context)
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...when it comes to women’s company, so no one seems as wonderful as Fanny or Mary. (full context)
Chapter 36
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...Fanny will be convinced to love Henry eventually. Fanny, meanwhile, worries about the possibility of Mary coming to visit them, fearing her anger. When Mary does pay them a visit, she... (full context)
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The two head upstairs to the East Room. Mary exclaims that she was only in the room once before, when she and Edmund were... (full context)
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Fanny then says that Mary should not be sad, since Mary is going to stay with friends, albeit different ones,... (full context)
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Mary tries many tactics to convince Fanny of the authenticity of Henry’s affection, starting by pointing... (full context)
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The two hug. Mary asks Fanny to write her letters and to look after Mrs. Grant. Fanny agrees, though... (full context)
Chapter 37
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...does not notice any changes. Edmund is surprised, however, that Fanny doesn’t seem sad that Mary is gone, since they were supposedly so close. In fact, Fanny worries that Mary and... (full context)
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...home to keep his parents company. He tells Fanny that he intends to propose to Mary when he finally gets to London. He tells Fanny he will write when he does.... (full context)
Chapter 38
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...They do not discuss Henry’s proposal, though. Despite Fanny’s hopes, Henry does not seem, from Mary’s letters, to have forgotten about her in London. (full context)
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Fanny looks at Betsey, and remembers another one of her sisters, Mary Price, who died after Fanny had left for Mansfield. Betsey shows Fanny a silver knife,... (full context)
Chapter 40
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Fanny receives Mary’s next letter, which arrives later than the previous ones, and she reads it excitedly, happy... (full context)
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...knife for Betsey so that she will stop stealing the knife that their deceased sister Mary (Price) gave to Susan. When she does, Susan is extremely grateful to her, and their... (full context)
Chapter 41
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...about Mansfield, which Fanny is happy to do, but when Henry implies that Edmund and Mary will hopefully be engaged soon, Fanny sours. (full context)
Chapter 42
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...if she needs anything from London, and Fanny tells him to send her love to Mary and to tell Edmund to write her. Henry leaves, refusing an invitation to dinner. (full context)
Chapter 43
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...to London the next day, and a few days later Fanny receives a letter from Mary saying that Henry told her of his visit. Mary then updates Fanny on the social... (full context)
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Fanny is gratified to learn that Edmund has not yet proposed to Mary, but dislikes that it seems that Mary, despite the distractions of London, is just as... (full context)
Chapter 44
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...letter arrives. Fanny reads it warily, afraid it will carry the news that he and Mary are engaged. Edmund writes that he has returned to Mansfield. He describes how Mary’s friends... (full context)
Chapter 45
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...helps tend to Tom. He writes to Fanny that he has decided not to send Mary a letter declaring his desire to marry her. (full context)
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After a long silence, Fanny receives a letter from Mary, saying that she hears that Tom may be dying, and asking Fanny whether this is... (full context)
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Mary’s unsavory hope that Tom will die disgusts Fanny. Likewise, she is skeptical of Henry’s relationship... (full context)
Chapter 46
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Fanny receives another letter from Mary over a week later. Mary writes to tell Fanny that there is a vicious rumor... (full context)
Chapter 47
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...five days after she arrives in Mansfield. Edmund tells Fanny that he went to see Mary while he was in London, where Mary expressed anger at both Henry and Maria. Her... (full context)
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Edmund is so disgusted by Mary blaming Fanny, and her focus on the detection of the affair and covering it up... (full context)
Chapter 48
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Fanny, back at Mansfield Park and totally certain that Edmund will never marry Mary, is very happy. Edmund, meanwhile, is very upset, and Sir Thomas even more so, as... (full context)
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The Grants, who luckily had gone away before all the drama, move to London permanently. Mary moves in with them, and resumes her city lifestyle. Dr. Grant eventually dies. Mary resolves... (full context)