Meno

by

Plato

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An important Athenian politician who—according to the historical record—fought as a general in the Peloponnesian War, though this detail doesn’t make its way into Meno. Anytus is Meno’s guest when he comes to Athens, and is even present for part of Meno’s discussion with Socrates about the nature of virtue. At one point, Socrates calls Anytus forth and asks him if he can identify a person who teaches virtue. Socrates, for his part, suggests that the Sophists teach virtue—an idea that enrages Anytus, who detests the Sophists and thinks of them as people who corrupt the youth of Athens. In keeping with this, Anytus is one of the men who eventually accuse Socrates of impiety and of corrupting the youth (accusations that lead to Socrates’s execution). At the end of their dialogue, Socrates asks Meno to convince Anytus of what he’s learned about virtue, saying that he would be doing Athens a great favor if he succeeded.
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Anytus Character Timeline in Meno

The timeline below shows where the character Anytus appears in Meno. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Meno
Teaching, Learning, and Intellectual Inquiry Theme Icon
Language, Rhetoric, and Reasoning Theme Icon
Virtue, Ignorance, and Knowledge Theme Icon
...Socrates believes, is an indication that virtue isn’t knowledge after all. However, he turns to Anytus (who is Meno’s host in Athens and later becomes one of the people who accuses... (full context)
Teaching, Learning, and Intellectual Inquiry Theme Icon
Virtue, Ignorance, and Knowledge Theme Icon
Addressing Anytus’s harsh view of the Sophists, Socrates asks if one of these teachers has “wronged” him.... (full context)
Teaching, Learning, and Intellectual Inquiry Theme Icon
Language, Rhetoric, and Reasoning Theme Icon
Virtue, Ignorance, and Knowledge Theme Icon
Socrates agrees with Anytus that there are many men in Athens who are good at “public affairs,” but he... (full context)
Teaching, Learning, and Intellectual Inquiry Theme Icon
Virtue, Ignorance, and Knowledge Theme Icon
Turning away from Anytus, Socrates resumes his conversation with Meno, who agrees that there is perhaps no one who... (full context)
Teaching, Learning, and Intellectual Inquiry Theme Icon
Language, Rhetoric, and Reasoning Theme Icon
Virtue, Ignorance, and Knowledge Theme Icon
...“what virtue in itself is.” However, Socrates now takes his leave, telling Meno to convince Anytus of what they’ve determined, “in order that he may be more amenable.” “If you succeed,”... (full context)