Metamorphoses

Metamorphoses

by

Ovid

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Jupiter (Jove) Character Analysis

Jupiter—or Jove—is Saturn’s son and the head of all the gods. His distinctive feature and weapon is the lightning bolt, which he uses either to kill people or signify his presence. Although Jupiter is married to Juno, he has countless other love interests throughout the Metamorphoses. These love interests are usually mortals or nymphs, as Jupiter does not want to sleep with a goddess who would bear children more powerful than himself. When a love interest attempts to resist Jupiter, he rapes her, disguising himself in all kinds of forms to do so. Jupiter’s affairs with various women anger Juno, who then seeks her revenge, creating much of the poem’s action. Semele—one of his love interests—bears him a child, Bacchus, who is birthed out of Jupiter’s thigh. Jupiter is the most powerful of all the gods, but not even he can defy Fate.

Jupiter (Jove) Quotes in Metamorphoses

The Metamorphoses quotes below are all either spoken by Jupiter (Jove) or refer to Jupiter (Jove) . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Metamorphosis Theme Icon
).
Book 2: Europa Quotes

Love and regal dignity, scarcely the best of friends,
are rarely discovered together. And so the father and ruler
of all the gods, whose right hand wields the three-forked lightning,
whose nod can sway the whole world, discarded his mighty scepter
and clothed himself in the form of a bull.

Related Characters: Jupiter (Jove)
Page Number: 486
Explanation and Analysis:
5.3 Quotes

please use words which accord
with the facts of the case. Lord Pluto hasn’t committed a crime
but an act of love. No need for us to feel shame at the marriage,
if only you will accept it, Ceres. Setting aside
all other advantages, Pluto is Jupiter’s brother, no less!

Related Characters: Jupiter (Jove) (speaker), Pluto , Ceres , Proserpina
Page Number: 124
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 9: Miletus Quotes

Have you no respect for me? […]
Where will this end? Does anyone think they can really defy
the decrees of Fate? […]
You are all subject to Fate, and—if this makes your subjection
more easy to bear—so am I.

Related Characters: Jupiter (Jove) (speaker)
Page Number: 428
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 15: The Apotheosis of Julius Caesar Quotes

You may go yourself [to] […] visit the Records of Fortune,
a massive structure of tablets inscribed in brass and the solidest
iron. These tablets fear no clashing of clouds, nor the thunderbolt’s
wrath, nor destruction, however it come; they are safe and abiding.
There you will find your families’ destinies cast in enduring
adamant.

Related Characters: Jupiter (Jove) (speaker), Venus , Julius Caesar
Page Number: 809
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Metamorphoses LitChart as a printable PDF.
Metamorphoses PDF

Jupiter (Jove) Character Timeline in Metamorphoses

The timeline below shows where the character Jupiter (Jove) appears in Metamorphoses. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1: The Four Ages
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When Saturn is banished to Tartarus, the dungeon of the gods, Jupiter, Saturn’s son, takes the throne and the Silver Age starts. Spring is broken into summer,... (full context)
Book 1: The Giants
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...the earth falls corrupt, giants build a stairway of mountains to the throne of heaven. Jupiter strikes Mount Olympus with lightning and it falls, crushing the giants. Mother Earth, wanting to... (full context)
Book 1: Lycaön
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Jupiter, also known as Jove, looks down from heaven and sighs, thinking of a gruesome visit... (full context)
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Jupiter assures the gods that Lycaön has been punished and recounts the story to them: Jove... (full context)
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Jupiter explains to the assembly that Lycaön is only one of many evil men who deserve... (full context)
Book 1: The Flood
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Jupiter starts to strike the earth with lightning, but he worries that the heavens will catch... (full context)
Book 1: Deucalion and Pyrrha
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...reaches the stars and that is the only piece of land uncovered by the flood. Jove is glad that the only two survivors of the flood are Deucalion and Pyrrha, both... (full context)
Book 1: Daphne
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...catch her but a man who loves her. He tells her that his father is Jupiter and that he’s an expert archer and healer, except that he cannot escape love’s arrow... (full context)
Book 1: Io (1)
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...appear. This is what happened to Io: one day, Io leaves her father’s river and Jupiter sees her and falls in love with her. He tells her to lie down in... (full context)
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Queen Juno—Jupiter’s wife—notices that the sunny day has turned to night and suspects that Jupiter is cheating... (full context)
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Jupiter is unable to bear Io’s distress. He calls for his son, Mercury, and orders him... (full context)
Book 1: Phaëthon (1)
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Io gives birth to Épaphus, who is rumored to be Jupiter’s son. When Épaphus starts school, he jeers at one of his peers, Phaëthon, for boasting... (full context)
Book 2: Phaëthon (2)
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After Mother Earth finishes her speech, Jupiter flies to the region where he rules the rain and clouds, but they are depleted.... (full context)
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...in eclipse. He declares that he won’t work for the world any longer; he wants Jupiter to take over driving the unruly horses so he can see how hard it is... (full context)
Book 2: Callisto
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Jupiter inspects heaven to make sure it hasn’t been damaged by the fire from the sun’s... (full context)
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Jupiter leaves Callisto. Diana appears with her group of virgins, but Callisto runs away, fearing Diana... (full context)
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Queen Juno hears of Jupiter’s infidelity. Furious, she finds Callisto, who has just given birth to Jupiter’s son, Arcas. The... (full context)
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...that it is his mother. He tries to kill the bear with his spear, but Jupiter blocks the blow. Jupiter then transports mother and son through space and implants them as... (full context)
Book 2: Ocyrhoë
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...be the healer of the world and will have the ability to revive spirits. When Jupiter gets angry with him for reviving a spirit, he will strike him dead with a... (full context)
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...Apollo to restore Ocyrhoë to human form, but Apollo doesn’t have the power to defy Jupiter. (full context)
Book 2: Europa
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After punishing Aglauros, Mercury returns to the sky. Jupiter asks Mercury to go drive a herd of royal cattle to the seashore, concealing his... (full context)
Book 3: Cadmus
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Jupiter carries Europa to the opposite shore where he drops his bull’s disguise. Meanwhile, Agenor—Europa’s father—tells... (full context)
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...sends a group of companions to the river to collect libations for a sacrifice to Jupiter. As soon as the men start to collect water, a fiery dragon that lurks in... (full context)
Book 3: Semele
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...that it was appropriate. Queen Juno applauds the punishment because she is still furious that Jupiter slept with Europa and is happy to see Europa’s lineage harmed. Now, Juno is furious... (full context)
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...as Semele’s elderly nurse and goes to talk to Semele. She urges Semele to ask Jupiter for proof that he is really a god. She suggests that Semele ask Jupiter to... (full context)
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Jupiter returns to the heavens, distressed because he can’t deny Semele’s request, although it will prove... (full context)
Book 3: Teiresias
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One day, Jupiter and Queen Juno argue over whether men or women enjoy sex more. To settle their... (full context)
Book 3: Narcissus and Echo
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...Echo, who falls in love with him. Echo is a nymph who used to help Jupiter in his infidelities by distracting Juno before she could catch Jupiter in the act. To... (full context)
Book 3: Pentheus and Bacchus (1)
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...gods and Teiresias’s foresight. Teiresias predicts that when Pentheus refuses to worship Bacchus—the son of Jupiter and Semele and the new god—his body will be torn to pieces and strewn throughout... (full context)
Book 4: Perseus (1)
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Perseus tells Atlas that he is the son of Jupiter. Atlas, remembering a prophecy he once heard that said the son of Jupiter would steal... (full context)
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In his new kingdom, Perseus builds sacrificial altars to Mercury, Minerva, and Jupiter. He and Andromeda have a regal wedding. Perseus tells how he obtained Medusa’s head: he... (full context)
Book 5: Perseus (2)
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...forcing him to stare into the Medusa head. Perseus’s grandfather now believes that Perseus is Jupiter’s son, but a nearby king still belittles Perseus’s glory and scoffs at the Medusa head.... (full context)
Book 5: Calliope’s Song: The Rape of Proserpina
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...she was queen of the underworld. Still in grief, Ceres goes to heaven to visit Jupiter. She begs him to rescue Proserpina—their daughter—from her kidnapper husband. (full context)
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Jupiter explains to Ceres that Pluto has not committed a crime but an act of love.... (full context)
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...Proserpina’s memory. The gods heeded their wish and turned them into Sirens—birds with human faces. Jupiter decides to settle the conflict between Pluto and Ceres by allowing Proserpina to split her... (full context)
Book 6: Arachne
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...the tapestry, she depicts two mountains that represent two mortals who once aspired to be Jupiter and Juno. In the other two corners, she depicts two women who competed with Juno... (full context)
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Arachne weaves a tapestry that depicts Jupiter kidnapping Europa in the disguise of a bull. She depicts many other women whom Jupiter... (full context)
Book 7: The Plague at Aegina
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...wants to die with his people. Many times, he tries to make a sacrifice to Jupiter, but the victim dies before he can kill it. Losing all hope, people start killing... (full context)
Book 7: The Birth of the Myrmidons
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Finally, King Aeacus protests to Jupiter, asking him to assist the son he had with Aegina (King Aeacus). Jove hears King... (full context)
Book 8: Scylla and Minos
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...that she has betrayed her kingdom and has been denied Crete. She tells Minos that Jupiter wasn’t the bull who seduced his mother, Europa, but that Minos was born from a... (full context)
Book 8: The Minotaur and Ariadne
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When Minos returns to Crete, he makes a sacrifice of 100 bulls to Jupiter. While he was away, his wife Pasiphae gave birth to the Minotaur—half man and half... (full context)
Book 8: Philemon and Baucis
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...him to visit an oak and linden tree in a certain land. Lelex says that Jupiter and Mercury once visited this land disguised as mortals. They went from house to house,... (full context)
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...one goose to serve, but their guests stop them and confess that they are gods. Jupiter and Mercury tell the couple that their neighbors will pay for their inhospitality, but that... (full context)
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Mercury and Jupiter ask Philemon and Baucis what they want. The couple ask to be made priests of... (full context)
Book 9: Achelous and Hercules
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...marriage. At the same time, Hercules asks Deianira’s father the same thing. Hercules explains that Jupiter is his father and that he has performed many tasks at his stepmother Juno’s request.... (full context)
Book 9: The Death of Hercules
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...to Hercules, who puts it on and sits before an altar lit with incense for Jupiter. The shirt starts to burn Hercules’s skin. He jumps up and pushes over the altar.... (full context)
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The gods watch as Hercules—Earth’s greatest hero— burns to death. Seeing their anxiety, Jupiter says that he is glad the whole world and the gods care for his son,... (full context)
Book 9: Iolaus and Callirhoe’s Sons
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...civil dispute in Thebes leads Callirhoe, the wife of Alcmaeon who was murdered, to ask Jupiter to put the years that were taken off Iolaus’s life onto her sons’ lives so... (full context)
Book 9: Miletus
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...has a person they want to see become either older or younger. As they bicker, Jupiter raises his voice and says that Fate causes people to age, and that none of... (full context)
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Jupiter draws the gods’ attention to Minos, whom Jupiter wishes he could revive. Minos used to... (full context)
Book 10: Orpheus’ Song: Introduction
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...tunes his lyre. He starts to play, saying that his song will first be about Jupiter, the most powerful god in the universe. Then he will sing about boys that the... (full context)
Book 10: Orpheus’ Song: Ganymede
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Orpheus sings that Jupiter once fell in love with a young boy named Ganymede. Jove disguised himself as an... (full context)
Book 10: Orpheus’ Song: The Cerastae and Propoetides
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...The Cerastae were a group of men who sacrificed human victims on their altar to Jupiter. This sacrifice of humans upset Venus, the goddess of life. She decided to punish the... (full context)
Book 11: Peleus and Thetis
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...capturing Troy, Telamon marries Hesione, Laomedon’s daughter. Peleus is already married to the goddess Thetis. Jupiter, Peleus’s grandfather, had lusted after Thetis, but didn’t want to sleep with her for fear... (full context)
Book 11: Peleus at the Court of Ceyx (1)
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...welcomes Peleus to Trachis, saying that Peleus is a famous man and the grandson of Jupiter. (full context)
Book 12: The Greeks at Aulis
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...but they are delayed by a storm in Aulis where they hold a ceremony for Jupiter. When they are about to make a sacrifice, a serpent slithers up a tree over... (full context)
Book 13: The Judgement of Arms
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...ground. Ulysses’s strength is in speaking, but Ajax’s is in battle. Ajax is descended from Jupiter through Telamon, who once captured Troy, and Aeacus, a judge in Hades. He is also... (full context)
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...Ulysses says that he is more intelligent than Ajax. Like Ajax, Ulysses is descended from Jupiter, but ancestry does not make him deserves Achilles’s arms; also, the fact that Ajax is... (full context)
Book 13: The Fall of Troy
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...once gave Philoctetes. He returns to Troy where Priam—Hector’s father—is sacrificed on an altar for Jupiter. Hector’s son Astyanax is thrown from a tower. The Trojan women cling to the statues... (full context)
Book 13: Memnon
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...was killed by Achilles. When Memnon is laid on the funeral pyre, Aurora goes to Jupiter and begs him to pay a tribute to Memnon; even though she is a woman... (full context)
Book 13: Acis, Galatea and Plyphemus
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...emerge from the water and live with him. He boasts that he is larger than Jupiter and that his hairiness is a sign of greatness. The Cyclops scorns the gods but... (full context)
Book 14: The Apotheosis of Aeneas
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...the gods to make Aeneas a god, too. She throws her arms around her father Jupiter’s neck and asks him to give his grandson Aeneas a place in heaven. Jupiter and... (full context)
Book 14: The Apotheosis of Romulus
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...death of the Sabine king, Romulus rules both Rome and Sabine. Mars then goes to Jupiter and recommends that, now that Rome is firmly established, he reward Romulus, Jupiter’s grandson, by... (full context)
Book 15: The Apotheosis of Julius Caesar
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Jupiter asks Venus why she is fighting Fate. He has read the tablets written with the... (full context)
Book 15: Epilogue
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Ovid concludes his poem, saying that nothing—not Jupiter’s anger, war, or time—can destroy his writing. One day, his body will die, but “the... (full context)