Middlemarch

Middlemarch

by

George Eliot

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Celia Brooke is Mr. Brooke’s niece and Dorothea’s sister. She is kind and cheerful, though less intelligent than her sister, whom she struggles to understand. Celia finds it easy to conform to the ideal of womanhood upheld in Middlemarch, and indeed enjoys living her life in this way. She marries Sir James Chettam after Dorothea rejects him and has a baby named Arthur.

Celia Brooke Quotes in Middlemarch

The Middlemarch quotes below are all either spoken by Celia Brooke or refer to Celia Brooke. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Women and Gender Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the HarperCollins edition of Middlemarch published in 2015.
Book 1, Chapter 4 Quotes

“It is very hard: it is your favourite fad to draw plans.”

“Fad to draw plans! Do you think I only care about my fellow creatures’ houses in that childish way? I may well make mistakes. How can one ever do anything nobly Christian, living among people with such petty thoughts?”

Related Characters: Dorothea Brooke (speaker), Celia Brooke (speaker)
Related Symbols: Cottages
Page Number: 37
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 8, Chapter 72 Quotes

“And, of course men know best about everything, except what women know better.”

Dorothea laughed and forgot her tears.

“Well, I mean about babies and those things,” explained Celia. “I should not give up to James when I knew he was wrong, as you used to do to Mr Casaubon.”

Related Characters: Dorothea Brooke (speaker), Celia Brooke (speaker), Sir James Chettam, Rev. Edward Casaubon
Page Number: 736
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Middlemarch LitChart as a printable PDF.
Middlemarch PDF

Celia Brooke Character Timeline in Middlemarch

The timeline below shows where the character Celia Brooke appears in Middlemarch. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 1
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
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...her look even more beautiful. People consider her highly intelligent, although they think her sister, Celia, has “more common-sense.” Though not noble, the Brookes are a “good” family, and women from... (full context)
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...Women are supposed to have “weak opinions” and conform to societal norms. Most people prefer Celia to Dorothea; on the other hand, Dorothea is undeniably charming despite her unusual behavior. She... (full context)
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...comes to the Brookes’ house, Tipton Grange, it is assumed he is in love with Celia. Dorothea has a “childlike” understanding of marriage and thinks her ideal husband would be like... (full context)
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After Dorothea comes home from the school she has set up in Middlemarch, Celia asks if they should divide up their mother’s jewels, since six months have now passed... (full context)
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Upset, Celia says that she is embarrassed to wear the jewelry if Dorothea refuses to do so.... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 2
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...to focus only on Casaubon. Sir James responds that Dorothea is too harsh on herself; Celia agrees that she is always promising to give things up. Dorothea blushes, annoyed. She wishes... (full context)
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...women are “too flighty” to be trusted with documents. Later, when the sisters are alone, Celia observes that Casaubon is very ugly, but Dorothea disagrees, saying he looks like John Locke.... (full context)
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Celia thinks it’s a shame that Dorothea doesn’t like Sir James, and fears that her sister... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 3
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...how friendly he is to her, considering he would be a much better suitor for Celia. Sir James tells Dorothea he has brought her something and hands over a little Maltese... (full context)
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Dorothea adds that she thinks Celia would like the puppy, but Sir James only responds by admiring Dorothea’s strong opinions. He... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 4
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Celia comments that Sir James is eager to do everything Dorothea wants, and Dorothea replies: “He... (full context)
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...the cottages and be rude to Sir James from now on. She begins to cry; Celia tries to comfort her but ends up insulting her by saying that her interest in... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 5
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...a letter arrives from Casaubon saying he will come to dinner at Tipton that night. Celia notices Dorothea’s reaction to this news and is horrified to realize that her sister seems... (full context)
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Celia says that she hopes someone else is coming to dinner so she doesn’t have to... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 6
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...will never take place. Just as Mrs. Cadwallader asks whom Dorothea could possibly marry instead, Celia enters the room and, when prompted, tells Mrs. Cadwallader that Dorothea is engaged to Casaubon.... (full context)
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...one foot in the grave.” Mrs. Cadwallader attempts to cheer him up and suggests that Celia might have been the better match all along. She notes that Celia clearly likes him,... (full context)
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...“the vulgar rich.” For years, Mrs. Cadwallader has been keeping an eye on Dorothea and Celia and chastising Mr. Brooke when necessary. She had been planning Dorothea’s engagement to Sir James... (full context)
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...cottages with Dorothea out of “friendly politeness,” although subconsciously he is also hoping to see Celia. (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 9
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...before marriage in order that she may have an appetite for submission afterwards.” Thus Dorothea, Celia, and Mr. Brooke make a trip to Casaubon’s home, Lowick Manor. It is a grand,... (full context)
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...her boudoir, Dorothea replies that she would rather he make all the decisions for her. Celia and Mr. Brooke urge her to make some kind of choice, but she refuses. (full context)
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...as the houses there are like the cottages she is designing. In a private moment, Celia whispers to Dorothea that she saw a young man with curly brown hair walking up... (full context)
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...by her role as “mistress of Lowick.” At this moment they see the young man Celia pointed out. Casaubon explains that the man, who is drawing in a sketchbook, is his... (full context)
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...this is kind of him, adding that people should be patient with one another. Later, Celia comments that Dorothea’s engagement appears to have given her a newfound appreciation for patience. (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 10
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...Rome on their honeymoon, where Casaubon will examine manuscripts held at the Vatican. Casaubon invites Celia to come as a companion to Dorothea, but both sisters are opposed to this idea.... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 22
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...Dorothea asks him to look at some cameos she has purchased as a gift for Celia. She says she finds it hard to enjoy things, such as great art, when she... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 28
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Dorothea runs into Celia and Mr. Brooke, who greet her enthusiastically. Dorothea and Celia go to speak alone, and... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 29
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...who has recently done an excellent job of treating Lady Chettam. When Sir James tell Celia what happened, they both remark on how awful Casaubon is and how strange it is... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 34
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...At Featherstone’s request, Mr. Cadwallader performs the service. Mrs. Cadwallader has persuaded Sir James and Celia to drive her to Lowick. Against Lydgate’s advice, Casaubon has returned to working with the... (full context)
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...Dorothea, and their guests watch through the window as the funeral train enters the church. Celia looks away, saying it makes her too sad to watch, and commenting that Dorothea probably... (full context)
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Everyone strains to see the stranger, and in that moment Celia exclaims that she didn’t know Ladislaw was coming. Mr. Brooke casually explains that Ladislaw is... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 39
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...motivate them and give life meaning. Dorothea says she must leave, as Mr. Brooke and Celia will be expecting her. (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 48
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...life feels empty, as she cannot do anything to truly please Casaubon. She can’t see Celia, who is resting after having just given birth to a baby. That Sunday night after... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 49
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...feeling better, she is not to know about any “business.” She should spend time with Celia and the baby, and Ladislaw should be sent away immediately. Brooke nervously replies that he... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 50
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...there aren’t and that she shouldn’t be thinking about the will yet. He hastily exits. Celia remains absorbed in the behavior of her baby, and when she sees Dorothea crying she... (full context)
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Celia eventually admits that Casaubon has done something terrible and that she must warn Dorothea about... (full context)
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...that Dorothea should be allowed to view the will if she wants to, and after Celia confesses that she told her sister about Casaubon’s stipulation, Sir James finally agrees to drive... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 54
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...been at Freshitt three months and is growing bored by spending all her time with Celia and the baby, Arthur. She loves Arthur and would do anything for him if necessary,... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 55
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...she is in love with him. She goes to stay a night at Freshitt on Celia’s request, and Mrs. Cadwallader is invited to dinner. It is hot, and Celia requests that... (full context)
Book 7, Chapter 67
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...although he adds that at the moment she is in Yorkshire with Sir James and Celia. Lydgate says that his association with the New Hospital has made him unpopular as a... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 72
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...Farebrother is almost convinced she is actually right. However, James insists that she hold back. Celia urges Dorothea to listen to James, who as her brother-in-law acts as a kind of... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 84
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...the House of Lords defeats the Reform Bill, Mr. Cadwallader and Mrs. Cadwallader, Sir James, Celia, and Lady Chettam are all sitting outside together discussing politics. Mr. Brooke approaches and mentions... (full context)
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...and says they should leave. Mr. Brooke invites everyone to dinner the next day, and Celia asks Sir James if they can go to Lowick. James replies that he cannot bear... (full context)
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Celia sees Dorothea alone in her boudoir. She tells Dorothea that she has deeply disappointed everyone,... (full context)
Finale
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One day Celia receives a letter saying that, after a dangerous pregnancy, Dorothea has given birth to a... (full context)