Middlemarch

Middlemarch

by

George Eliot

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Middlemarch can help.

Mr. Arthur Brooke Character Analysis

Mr. Brooke is Celia and Dorothea’s uncle, who is charged with their education and care after their parents die young. He is a lifelong bachelor who travelled a lot in his youth. He is generally a friendly and pleasant person but also rather foolish; he changes his mind often and sometimes appears to struggle to understand complicated discussions. He is also decidedly sexist. Mr. Brooke decides to run for election as a Whig in Middlemarch and recruits Will Ladislaw to help with his political campaign, as well as to take over editing the local progressive newspaper, the Pioneer, which Mr. Brooke has purchased. His move into politics gets off to a rocky start, as people accuse him of hypocrisy for pushing a social reform agenda when he is known to be a terrible landlord. However, he perseveres anyway. In the finale, it is noted that Mr. Brooke lives to a very old age.
Get the entire Middlemarch LitChart as a printable PDF.
Middlemarch PDF

Mr. Arthur Brooke Character Timeline in Middlemarch

The timeline below shows where the character Mr. Arthur Brooke appears in Middlemarch. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 1
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Dorothea Brooke tends to wear simple, modest clothes, which make her look even more beautiful. People consider... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
If Dorothea marries and has a son, her son will inherit Mr. Brooke’s substantial estate. As such she is considered an “heiress.” Dorothea’s beauty and inheritance make her... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
...they should divide up their mother’s jewels, since six months have now passed since Mr. Brooke gave them to the sisters. Dorothea kindly responds that they shouldn’t wear the jewels, but... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 2
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
At dinner, Mr. Brooke recalls meeting the poet William Wordsworth. Dorothea feels awkward. Sir James explains that he is... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke returns to discussing politics, and Dorothea says that she wishes he would let her organize... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 3
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Afterward, Casaubon looks at Mr. Brooke’s documents in his office. Before going, he tells Dorothea he has been feeling lonely. He... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...of interest in the cottages. Dorothea feels ashamed at her own feelings of disappointment. Mr. Brooke then goes to visit Casaubon at Lowick, while Sir James visits Tipton with greater and... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 4
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...is a “fad.” Dorothea reacts furiously and feels resentful of Celia. At that moment Mr. Brooke returns from a trip to town. He mentions that he stopped at Lowick for lunch... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke finds Dorothea entranced by her reading; he tells her that he’s noticed Casaubon wants a... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke is confused, feeling that he doesn’t understand women. At 45, Casaubon is 27 years older... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 5
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
...than that which would be one with yours.” Later, she gives the letter to Mr. Brooke, asking that he send it in the morning. (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke checks that Dorothea is certain she doesn’t want to marry Sir James instead. He tells... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 6
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...birth” yet claims to be poor and always gossips with servants. When she greets Mr. Brooke, she says she saw Casaubon leaving and accuses the two of them of plotting to... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Mrs. Cadwallader teases Mr. Brooke and warns him not to get involved with politics. Brooke replies that he doesn’t debate... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...Sir James on his way to Tipton. First, she tells him that she accused Mr. Brooke of planning to run as a Whig and that she was unconvinced by his denial.... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...years, Mrs. Cadwallader has been keeping an eye on Dorothea and Celia and chastising Mr. Brooke when necessary. She had been planning Dorothea’s engagement to Sir James ever since the sisters... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 7
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke tells Casaubon that certain subjects are too difficult for women, but Casaubon replies that Dorothea... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 8
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
...James replies that Dorothea is “too young to know what she likes” and that Mr. Brooke should intervene.   (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 9
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...order that she may have an appetite for submission afterwards.” Thus Dorothea, Celia, and Mr. Brooke make a trip to Casaubon’s home, Lowick Manor. It is a grand, elegant house, but... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
...replies that she would rather he make all the decisions for her. Celia and Mr. Brooke urge her to make some kind of choice, but she refuses. (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke points to Will’s sketchbook and comments that he is an artist, but Will replies that... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 10
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...Dorothea, debating which qualities make a woman attractive. They also discuss Rosamond Vincy, whom Mr. Brooke did not invite to the dinner because she is the daughter of a manufacturer. (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 18
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...person argues that too much dramatic preaching and praying is bad for sick people. Mr. Brooke is also present, along with the Rev. Edward Thesiger. Brooke says he is happy with... (full context)
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Others claim that Mr. Brooke must have received biased assessments of the two candidates. The men debate whether there should... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 28
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Dorothea runs into Celia and Mr. Brooke, who greet her enthusiastically. Dorothea and Celia go to speak alone, and when Celia asks... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 30
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...brought to him at Lowick—hence Will’s plan to visit. Dorothea gives the letters to Mr. Brooke, asking him to write and explain that Casaubon is too ill for visitors. (full context)
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke writes a long letter complimenting Will and explaining that he cannot come to Lowick. However,... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 34
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...stranger, and in that moment Celia exclaims that she didn’t know Ladislaw was coming. Mr. Brooke casually explains that Ladislaw is staying with him. Casaubon concludes that Dorothea must have asked... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 37
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...However, the anti-Catholic Trumpet is not favored either. Mr. Hackbutt tells Mr. Hawley that Mr. Brooke is rumored to have acquired the Pioneer in secret, adding that he has got “a... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...though he is no radical, the electoral system in England does have serious problems. Mr. Brooke, meanwhile, describes Ladislaw as a “kind of Shelley,” clarifying that he means this in a... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...for a man, but rather to be an actress. He then tells Dorothea about Mr. Brooke buying the Pioneer and asking Will to stay in Middlemarch and edit it. He says... (full context)
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
When Casaubon comes home, Dorothea tells him about Will’s visit and Mr. Brooke’s proposal. She suggests that it would be good for Will to finally have a job... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
...have been part of a plan to turn Dorothea against him. He considers contacting Mr. Brooke or Sir James for help. However, he doesn’t feel he can rely on anyone to... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 38
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...James comes to lunch at the Cadwalladers’, and the group discuss their disapproval of Mr. Brooke’s latest endeavor. They speculate about whether Mr. Brooke will run for election; Mr. Cadwallader says... (full context)
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Sir James criticizes the way Mr. Brooke runs his estate, saying that he doesn’t take good enough care of his tenants. He... (full context)
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
Sir James mentions Garth’s farming innovations and Brooke says he doesn’t have the money for that; Mrs. Cadwallader then points out that running... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 39
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
One day Dorothea comes to see Mr. Brooke and Will while they are at work together on the issue of capital punishment. Her... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke admits that Dorothea may have a point, although not without mentioning the limits of women’s... (full context)
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Outside, Mr. Brooke approaches one of his tenants, Mr. Dagley, telling him that his son has killed a... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 40
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...to laugh, but cannot fight back her tears. Mr. Garth reads a letter from Mr. Brooke, asking him to come back and manage both Freshitt and Tipton. Everyone at the table... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 46
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...that, with all the hype surrounding the Reform Bill, there will soon be another election. Brooke says he doesn’t want to take a position on the question of electoral reform, instead... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 47
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...who suddenly worries that he is “making a fool of himself” through his work with Brooke. Surprisingly, he does not spend time dreaming of becoming Dorothea’s husband in the event of... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 49
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...day after Casaubon’s funeral, Dorothea remains shut up in her room. Sir James tells Mr. Brooke that until Dorothea is feeling better, she is not to know about any “business.” She... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke insists that sending Ladislaw away won’t prevent malicious rumors and gossip. He also can’t force... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 50
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
After staying at Freshitt for week, Dorothea starts asking “dangerous questions.” She speaks to Mr. Brooke about who will take over as the clergyman for Lowick; Brooke assures her there is... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
...she would like to continue staying at Freshitt, and also to spend time with Mr. Brooke at Tipton, but Sir James advises against visiting Tipton as he knows Ladislaw will be... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 51
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...sales of alcohol decline). Will has no idea about Casaubon’s will, but has noticed that Brooke has suddenly stopped inviting him to Tipton, which angers him. He thinks: “I might as... (full context)
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke has a conversation with Mr. Mawmsey who, as the local grocer, finds himself pulled in... (full context)
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
One morning in May, Brooke prepares to give a public speech in advance of the official nomination procedure the next... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Eggs now come flying at Brooke himself, and he flees to avoid being hit. He tries to assure Will that everything... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 54
Women and Gender Theme Icon
...months and is growing bored by spending all her time with Celia and the baby, Arthur. She loves Arthur and would do anything for him if necessary, but finds it tedious... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Mrs. Cadwallader protests to her husband that Mr. Brooke is being irresponsible by neglecting to bring suitors to see Dorothea. Dorothea, meanwhile, has been... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 62
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
...for Tipton Grange. While driving there she weeps. She intends to do some errands Mr. Brooke left for her, but upon arriving at Tipton she is informed that Will is there,... (full context)
Book 7, Chapter 63
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Farerbrother approaches Lydgate and says he heard from Mr. Brooke that Lydgate was responsible for persuading Dorothea to give Farebrother the position at Lowick. Lydgate... (full context)
Book 7, Chapter 71
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...suspicious and that the £1000 Bulstrode gave him was a bribe. After the meeting, Mr. Brooke and Farebrother go to see Dorothea and tell her the shocking news about Lydgate and... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 76
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...too much money and wants to give it away, especially after Sir James and Mr. Brooke persuaded heƒr that her idea of building a colony was “too risky.” Hearing about Dorothea’s... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 77
Women and Gender Theme Icon
...Hall. Gripped by a kind of mania, she intends to tell Sir James and Mr. Brooke all about Lydgate’s marriage difficulties.  (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 81
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Dorothea tells Rosamond that Mr. Farebrother, Mr. Brooke, and Sir James all know and believe the truth about Lydgate’s involvement in the Bulstrode... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 84
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
...Cadwallader, Sir James, Celia, and Lady Chettam are all sitting outside together discussing politics. Mr. Brooke approaches and mentions that he has “sad news,” which he will tell everyone if they... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke says he tried to reason with Dorothea, but there was no use as she doesn’t... (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
Mr. Brooke says the wedding is in three weeks. Mr. Cadwallader comments that if Dorothea wants to... (full context)
Finale
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Ambition and Disappointment Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...wife and mother, although it is not clear what else she could have done. Mr. Brooke writes to Will and Dorothea often. (full context)
Women and Gender Theme Icon
Community and Class Theme Icon
Progress and Reform Theme Icon
Money and Greed Theme Icon
...The couples begin seeing each other at regular intervals, and their children become close. Mr. Brooke lives a long time; Dorothea’s son inherits Tipton Grange. The narrator concludes that Dorothea’s life... (full context)