Miss Julie

by

August Strindberg

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The Count Character Analysis

Although he doesn’t appear onstage during the play, the Count is manifested in the play in other ways: his large pair of boots sits on the chair, and late in the play the shrill double-ringing of the bell signals his return. After Miss Julie’s mother’s death, the Count, who is Julie's father, regained control of his estate, but not without sustaining significant damage to his reputation. When he returns to the estate near the end of the play, his presence is enough to reinstate the social hierarchies that seemed to gradually deteriorate over the course of the paly, sapping Jean of his virility and his resolve to escape. In addition, the specter of the Count hangs over Julie’s final decision to end her own life, because she views it as the only way to preserve his already-tarnished reputation and to end his bloodline without causing further damage to his house.

The Count Quotes in Miss Julie

The Miss Julie quotes below are all either spoken by The Count or refer to The Count. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dover Thrift Editions edition of Miss Julie published in 1992.
Miss Julie Quotes

There will be barriers between us as long as we stay in this house… there is the count – and I have never met another person for whom I felt such respect. If I only catch sight of his gloves on a chair I feel small. If I only hear that bell up there, I jump like a shy horse.

Related Characters: Jean (speaker), Miss Julie, The Count
Page Number: 16
Explanation and Analysis:

But he was the one who reared me in contempt for my own sex—half woman and half man! Whose fault is it, this that has happened? My father's—my mother's—my own? My own? Why, I have nothing that is my own.

Related Characters: Miss Julie (speaker), Julie’s Mother, The Count
Page Number: 34
Explanation and Analysis:

Command me, and I'll obey you like a dog! Do me this last favor – save my honor, and save his name! You know what my will ought to do, and what it cannot do-now give me your will, and make me do it!

Related Characters: Miss Julie (speaker), Jean, The Count
Page Number: 35
Explanation and Analysis:

I cannot command you – and now, since I've heard the count's voice – now – l can't quite explain it – but – Oh, that damned menial is back in my spine again. I believe if the count should come down here, and if he should tell me to cut my own throat – I'd do it on the spot!

Related Characters: Jean (speaker), The Count
Page Number: 35
Explanation and Analysis:
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Miss Julie PDF

The Count Character Timeline in Miss Julie

The timeline below shows where the character The Count appears in Miss Julie. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Author’s Preface 
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
...notes that Jean’s “slave” mind does show up in his fear and reverence for the Count, as well as in his belief in God. Jean primarily views the Count as an... (full context)
Class  Theme Icon
...Christine in for reference), but he made sure to keep the “unfortunate spirit of the father hovering above the action.” Strindberg believed that the Count provides important psychological background for both... (full context)
Miss Julie
Class  Theme Icon
...is working in the kitchen. Jean (a valet) enters and begins cleaning his master the Count’s boots. Jean tells Christine that their mistress, the Count’s daughter Miss Julie, is “crazy tonight,”... (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Class  Theme Icon
Confinement and Escape Theme Icon
...for not warming the plate first and for drinking beer instead of one of the Count’s fine wines. Christine jokes that Jean is harder to please than the Count himself. (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Class  Theme Icon
Confinement and Escape Theme Icon
...impressed with Jean’s command of language and asks him his parentage. Jean explains that his father was a cotter on her father’s estate and that he recalls seeing her as a... (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Natural vs. Unnatural Womanhood Theme Icon
Class  Theme Icon
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
Jean offers Miss Julie some of her father’s wine, but she says that she has simpler tastes and prefers to drink beer. Julie... (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Natural vs. Unnatural Womanhood Theme Icon
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
...tells Julie that it is impossible for the two of them to stay on the Count’s estate since they have slept together. Jean tells Julie that they will go to Switzerland... (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
Confinement and Escape Theme Icon
...always be a barrier between them until they can escape. While Jean remains in the Count’s house, he says that any visual reminder of the Count (like his boots, which are... (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Natural vs. Unnatural Womanhood Theme Icon
Aghast, Julie says that she will refuse to stay in her father’s house having been sullied by Jean. She laments her poor judgement, which will likely cause... (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Class  Theme Icon
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
Unmoved, Jean opens a drawer and pours a glass of the Count’s best Burgundy, claiming it is “good enough for his son-in-law.”  (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Natural vs. Unnatural Womanhood Theme Icon
...equality and independence. Miss Julie’s mother disdained the idea of marriage but agreed to the Count’s proposal all the same. (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Natural vs. Unnatural Womanhood Theme Icon
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
Eventually, the Count rebelled against his wife’s ideas and took control over his house. Julie’s mother became incredibly... (full context)
Natural vs. Unnatural Womanhood Theme Icon
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
...allowing her husband to control of it. However, the bricklayer kept her money and the Count could not prove it had been his wife’s money for fear of the scandal caused... (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Natural vs. Unnatural Womanhood Theme Icon
Miss Julie tells Jean that her father almost killed himself but eventually got “a new lease on life” and her mother eventually... (full context)
Natural vs. Unnatural Womanhood Theme Icon
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
...her that the only solution is for Julie to travel abroad by herself before the Count comes back and finds out what has happened. Jean refuses to run away with Julie... (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Natural vs. Unnatural Womanhood Theme Icon
...get ready for church. They hear footsteps walking around upstairs and Christine wonders if the Count has come home early without anyone noticing. Jean dismisses the idea and Christine exits. (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
Confinement and Escape Theme Icon
...telling him that she has enough money to support them, having stolen it from her father’s safe. (full context)
Class  Theme Icon
...“Mrs. Hovel” and be the mistress of her servant. Instead, Julie resolves to tell the Count that she slept with a servant and stole money from him to secure her escape.... (full context)
Class  Theme Icon
...secure deals on meat and other goods from the butcher and other members of the Count’s staff. (full context)
Class  Theme Icon
...needle than for a rich man to get into heaven.” Christine vows to leave the Count’s estate, and she does so after telling the gatekeeper to stop either Julie or Jean... (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Natural vs. Unnatural Womanhood Theme Icon
Julie tells Jean that she is not strong enough to kill herself, just like the Count before her. Julie sees her suicide as an extension of her mother’s revenge against her... (full context)
Biology vs. Society Theme Icon
Class  Theme Icon
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
Julie and Jean hear two rings of the bell upstairs, signaling that the Count has indeed returned unnoticed. The Count calls to Jean to bring his boots and his... (full context)
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
Confinement and Escape Theme Icon
Miss Julie begs Jean to pretend to be the Count and muster the resolve of a nobleman to “hypnotize” her and give her orders. Miss... (full context)
Class  Theme Icon
Dominance vs. Submission Theme Icon
Confinement and Escape Theme Icon
The Count rings the bell again from upstairs and Jean orders Julie through the door. Miss Julie... (full context)