Moby-Dick

Moby-Dick

An African American boy, Pip has small jobs on the Pequod, mostly cleaning the decks, but goes mad after falling out of Stubb’s whale-boat (he had been called into rowing duty after another sailor fell ill) and being left alone for some time in the sea before being rescued. Pip, in his madness, becomes attached to the also mad Ahab at the end of the novel.

Pip Quotes in Moby-Dick

The Moby-Dick quotes below are all either spoken by Pip or refer to Pip. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Limits of Knowledge Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Classics edition of Moby-Dick published in 2002.
Chapter 99 Quotes

Cook! ho, coo! and cook us! Jenny! hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, Jenny, Jenny! and get your hoe-cake done!

Related Characters: Pip (speaker)
Page Number: 475
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur s

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

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Pip Character Timeline in Moby-Dick

The timeline below shows where the character Pip appears in Moby-Dick. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 40: Midnight, Forecastle
Limits of Knowledge Theme Icon
Fate and Free Will Theme Icon
Nature and Man Theme Icon
Race, Fellowship, and Enslavement Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Religion Theme Icon
...storm rises and they must go about “battening down” the ship to prepare for it. Pip, a small African boy who was taken onto the boat some time earlier, speaks quietly... (full context)
Chapter 93: The Castaway
Limits of Knowledge Theme Icon
Fate and Free Will Theme Icon
Nature and Man Theme Icon
Race, Fellowship, and Enslavement Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Religion Theme Icon
Ishmael loops back to the story of Pip, a young African American boy from Connecticut, whose dancing and singing were reported upon many... (full context)
Limits of Knowledge Theme Icon
Fate and Free Will Theme Icon
Nature and Man Theme Icon
Race, Fellowship, and Enslavement Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Religion Theme Icon
But later that afternoon, Pip again become affrighted and jumped out of the boat; this time, Stubb did not pick... (full context)
Chapter 99: The Doubloon
Limits of Knowledge Theme Icon
Fate and Free Will Theme Icon
Nature and Man Theme Icon
Race, Fellowship, and Enslavement Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Religion Theme Icon
...looking at the doubloon—he is only studying his pronouns in an English grammar book. And Pip, last of the crew, understands the doubloon to spell the crew’s demise, once Moby Dick... (full context)
Chapter 125: The Log and Line
Limits of Knowledge Theme Icon
Fate and Free Will Theme Icon
Nature and Man Theme Icon
Race, Fellowship, and Enslavement Theme Icon
...his means of locating the ship (the log, the needle, and the quadrant). Ahab asks Pip to come help him, but Pip responds with nonsense spoken in his customary tones of... (full context)
Chapter 127: The Deck
Limits of Knowledge Theme Icon
Fate and Free Will Theme Icon
Nature and Man Theme Icon
Race, Fellowship, and Enslavement Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Religion Theme Icon
Ahab has a short conversation with the carpenter as he seals the coffin. Pip, following behind asks both the carpenter and Ahab, whether it isn’t strange to help a... (full context)
Chapter 129: The Cabin
Limits of Knowledge Theme Icon
Fate and Free Will Theme Icon
Nature and Man Theme Icon
Race, Fellowship, and Enslavement Theme Icon
Madness Theme Icon
Religion Theme Icon
Ahab tells Pip that Pip must leave him—that they are embarking on the portion of the journey that... (full context)