Mr. Pip

Mr. Watts’s wife, who is originally from Bougainville. Having left the island to attend dental school in New Zealand, she rented part of Mr. Watts’s house, where they eventually began an affair and fell in love. After the death of their child, Sarah, the couple moved back to Bougainville, returning to a community that was suddenly suspicious of Grace, who they believed had forgotten her roots. But this was not the case. In a spare room in her and Mr. Watts’s New Zealand home, Grace had filled the white walls with lessons she’d learned as a child, stories her relatives told her, and certain other bits of island folklore—all in the hopes of educating her daughter Elizabeth about her culture. Grace goes into a deep depression after Elizabeth dies, eventually going to a psychiatric hospital before later returning with Mr. Watts to Bougainville, where years later she dies of an intense fever.

Grace Watts Quotes in Mr. Pip

The Mr. Pip quotes below are all either spoken by Grace Watts or refer to Grace Watts. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Storytelling Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dial Press edition of Mr. Pip published in 2008.
Chapter 1 Quotes

He pulled a piece of rope attached to a trolley on which Mrs. Pop Eye stood. She looked like an ice queen. Nearly every woman on our island had crinkled hair, but Grace had straightened hers. She wore it piled up, and in the absence of a crown her hair did the trick. She looked so proud, as if she had no idea of her own bare feet. […]

Our parents looked away. They would rather stare at a colony of ants moving over a rotting pawpaw. Some stood by with their idle machetes, waiting for the spectacle to pass. For the younger kids the sight consisted only of a white man towing a black woman. […] Us older kids sensed a bigger story. Sometimes we caught a snatch of conversation. Mrs. Watts was as mad as a goose. Mr. Watts was doing penance for an old crime. Or maybe it was the result of a bet. The sight represented a bit of uncertainty in our world, which in every other way knew only sameness.

Related Characters: Matilda Laimo (speaker), Tom Watts (Pop Eye), Grace Watts
Page Number: 2
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Mr. Pip quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Chapter 10 Quotes

Sometimes as he read we saw him smile privately, leaving us to wonder why, at that particular moment—only to realize yet again that there were parts of Mr. Watts we could not possibly know because of our ignorance of where he’d come from, and to reflect on what he’d given up in order to join Grace on our island.

Related Characters: Matilda Laimo (speaker), Tom Watts (Pop Eye), Grace Watts
Related Symbols: Great Expectations
Page Number: 65
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 17 Quotes

Because for as long as I could remember, Grace Watts was not really included in the village. She lived with a white man, a man whom our parents didn’t especially warm to. It was partly that, and partly the strange sight of her standing in that trolley towed along by Mr. Watts wearing a red clown’s nose. We did not understand the reason for this, we had no idea what it meant, and so it had been convenient to think Mrs. Watts was mad.

Related Characters: Matilda Laimo (speaker), Tom Watts (Pop Eye), Grace Watts
Page Number: 144
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Get the entire Mr. Pip LitChart as a printable PDF.
Mr pip.pdf.medium

Grace Watts Character Timeline in Mr. Pip

The timeline below shows where the character Grace Watts appears in Mr. Pip. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Other Theme Icon
The Community Theme Icon
...linen suit and a red clown’s nose. Dressed in this odd fashion, he would tow Grace in a small trolley behind him. Children would gape at the strange scene, noting that... (full context)
The Other Theme Icon
The Community Theme Icon
During these outings, Grace carried a blue parasol to shade herself from the sun. Matilda remembers how she and... (full context)
Chapter 10
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Other Theme Icon
The Community Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
...is as good as a change of clothes.” He also explained that his own wife, Grace, had changed her name many years ago to Sheba because she was “at a time... (full context)
Chapter 15
The Other Theme Icon
The Community Theme Icon
...blame, the town went about rebuilding beds and other amenities. One day, Mr. Watts and Grace appeared with their trolley, clown’s nose, and parasol. Matilda writes that it was a shock... (full context)
Chapter 16
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Community Theme Icon
...hadn’t been sure even he was going to be able to make it, given that Grace had become quite sick. He acknowledged that everybody—including himself—had recently lost valuable possessions, emphasizing that... (full context)
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Other Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
...as a result of her mother’s phrase. When she arrived, Mr. Watts was tending to Grace, who looked very sick. Matilda blurted out the line, startling Mr. Watts as he held... (full context)
Chapter 17
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Community Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
Before Matilda was about to fall asleep one night, her mother told her that Grace Watts died. At the funeral not long afterward, the villagers convened to pay their respects.... (full context)
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Other Theme Icon
The Community Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
At home that night, Dolores told Matilda that Grace was the smartest child in school. The village, she explained, had high hopes for her... (full context)
Chapter 18
The Other Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
Only several days after Grace’s funeral, Mr. Watts was back in the classroom encouraging his students to summon their memories... (full context)
The Other Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
...a creek where she liked to wash her clothes, Matilda came upon Mr. Watts at Grace’s grave. Standing next to him, she asked him if his wife loved Great Expectations as... (full context)
Chapter 20
Hybridity Theme Icon
...and gave him her house, which he turned into two units and rented out to Grace, who was attending dental school. Over time, he became enamored of Grace, and eventually they... (full context)
Chapter 21
Storytelling Theme Icon
One day between story installments, Matilda caught up with Mr. Watts at Grace’s grave, where he told her a secret: he had organized an escape from the island... (full context)
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Other Theme Icon
The Community Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
Mr. Watts told the rebels and villagers that he and Grace had a spare room in their house. Before Elizabeth was born, Grace began writing her... (full context)
Chapter 22
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Other Theme Icon
The Community Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
Mr. Watts continued with his story. Back in the spare room, he and Grace filled up the walls with information and anecdotes, many of which originated—in Grace’s case—from Bougainville.... (full context)
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Other Theme Icon
The Community Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
...with its multiple anecdotes and tales that seemed to admit his own ignorance while championing Grace’s wisdom, which she had clearly gleaned from her childhood on Bougainville. Not long after Elizabeth... (full context)
Chapter 23
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Other Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
After Mr. Watts’s story about Grace and the Queen of Sheba, Matilda followed him into the woods and asked if he... (full context)
Chapter 24
Storytelling Theme Icon
...night and wandered in a strong wind, listening to heavy thunder. She wanted to visit Grace’s grave to tell her what had happened to Mr. Watts, but she never made it... (full context)
Chapter 26
Hybridity Theme Icon
...her to June Watts, who lived in the very house in which Mr. Watts met Grace. Apparently, Mr. Watts had failed to mention that he was already married to another woman... (full context)
Storytelling Theme Icon
The Other Theme Icon
Hybridity Theme Icon
Before Matilda left, June showed her photo albums of Mr. Watts and Grace acting in amateur theater performances. One of the pictures depicts them in a production of... (full context)