Mr. Pip

by

Lloyd Jones

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Mr. Pip can help.
The main character of Charles Dickens’s novel Great Expectations. After listening to Mr. Watts read the book aloud, Matilda feels connected to Pip, who is an orphan in early nineteenth-century England. Part of Pip’s appeal has to do with the fact that he never knew his own parents, which resonates with Matilda because she feels as if she doesn’t know her father, who left Bougainville when she was only eleven years old. As Pip comes of age in Great Expectations, he inherits a large amount of money and, in order to win the favor of the wealthy Estella, goes to London to learn how to become a gentleman. Matilda often evokes Pip’s adventures, wondering how he must have felt in certain circumstances and applying these thoughts to her own life.

Pip Quotes in Mr. Pip

The Mr. Pip quotes below are all either spoken by Pip or refer to Pip. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dial Press edition of Mr. Pip published in 2008.
Chapter 4 Quotes

This was the first time I had been in a position to tell her anything about the world. But this was a place she did not know about and hadn’t heard of. She couldn’t even pretend to know, so it was up to me to color in that world for her. I couldn’t remember the exact words Mr. Watts had read to us, and I didn’t think I would be able to make it possible for my mum to slip into that world that us kids had or into Pip’s life or some other’s, that of the convict, say. So I told her in my own words about Pip having no mum or dad or brothers, and my mum cried out, “He is lost.”

Related Characters: Matilda Laimo (speaker), Dolores Laimo (speaker), Tom Watts (Pop Eye), Pip
Related Symbols: Great Expectations
Page Number: 26
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

The trouble with Great Expectations is that it’s a one-way conversation. There’s no talking back. Otherwise I would have told Pip about my mum coming to speak to the class, and how, seeing her at a distance—even though only two desks back from the end of the room—she had appeared different to me. More hostile. […]

Whatever I might say about my mum to Pip I knew he wouldn’t hear me. I could only follow him through some strange country that contained marshes and pork pies and people who spoke in long and confusing sentences.

Related Characters: Matilda Laimo (speaker), Dolores Laimo, Pip
Related Symbols: Great Expectations
Page Number: 45
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Mr. Pip LitChart as a printable PDF.
Mr. Pip PDF

Pip Character Timeline in Mr. Pip

The timeline below shows where the character Pip appears in Mr. Pip. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3
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...Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.” So began his reading... (full context)
Chapter 4
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...quickly swept away by Great Expectations, feeling she had “been spoken to by this boy Pip” after just the first chapter. She notes that nobody had told her or her fellow... (full context)
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As Mr. Watts’s reading of Great Expectations progressed, Matilda got to know Pip more and more and realized she had certain things in common with him despite their... (full context)
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...in regards to her narration of Great Expectations to Dolores. When her mother learned that Pip is an orphan, she lamented, “He is lost.” Sensing Dolores’s interest in the story, Matilda... (full context)
Chapter 5
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That night, Dolores was skeptical when Matilda told her of Pip’s decision to steal his sister’s pork pie for Magwitch, the escaped convict. When she asked... (full context)
Chapter 6
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...down to the beach to test Dolores’s crab method. While she was there, Matilda scratched “PIP” into the sand and lined the letters with white heart seeds. (full context)
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As Great Expectations progressed, Matilda began to feel sorry that Pip couldn’t fully enter her world. She laments that she was always visiting his life, creating... (full context)
Chapter 8
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...herself hoped only for “hope itself,” knowing that “things could change because they had for Pip.” She then briefly summarizes Pip’s changing luck, which comes about when, after working as a... (full context)
Chapter 10
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...of his usual white linen suit. When he stopped to say hello, he saw her “PIP” inscription in the sand, saying, “A shrine. […] Pip in the Pacific.” Matilda told him... (full context)
Chapter 13
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...say it. Before the villagers could say anything, though, a soldier arrived with news of Pip’s name in the beach sand. “Who is Pip?” asked the officer. Suddenly his voice had... (full context)
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...safety. As such, he told them that he was, in fact, Charles Dickens, and that Pip is a character in a book. This exasperated the officer, who was unlikely to believe... (full context)
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Convinced Pip was a rebel soldier the village was hiding, the “redskin” officer ordered his men to... (full context)
Chapter 15
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...did not have the patience he had exhibited last time. Once again, he asked for Pip, and Dolores made no move to retrieve Great Expectations. When it became evident to the... (full context)
Chapter 16
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...discovered that her mother’s exasperated and mean-spirited rants were reminiscent of Estella’s cold treatment of Pip in Great Expectations. When Dolores erupted one day with the line, “Do you not have... (full context)
Chapter 18
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...her father’s Australian sponsor to Mr. Jaggers, the lawyer who serves as a middleman between Pip and his anonymous guardian (who gives him a fortune) in Great Expectations. Like Mr. Jaggers,... (full context)
Chapter 19
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...himself. When the soldiers asked who he was, Mr. Watts told them his name was Pip, roughly quoting the first line of Great Expectations: “My Christian name is Philip, but my... (full context)
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...installments. In turn, Matilda began to see why her teacher had decided to call himself Pip. Now he could blend parts of Great Expectations with elements of his own life, moving... (full context)
Chapter 20
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At first, Matilda refers to the protagonist of Mr. Watts’s story as “Mr. Watts’s Pip,” who like Dickens’s Pip was an orphan, though this Pip was brought up in New... (full context)
Chapter 21
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...the matter into her own hands without breaking her promise, then, she told Dolores about Pip’s “readiness to leave behind everything that had gone into making him” when he learned that... (full context)
Chapter 23
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...the drunken rebel as their prisoner. When the lead officer asked the drunk to identify Pip—who he still believed was a rebel fugitive the village was hiding—the drunk pointed to the... (full context)
Chapter 25
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...read aloud, an act that never failed to calm down her students, mesmerizing them with Pip’s story. After a time, she started writing a thesis about Dickens and decided to visit... (full context)