Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger

by

Saki

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Loona Bimberton Character Analysis

Loona Bimberton is an attention-seeking London socialite whose sole purpose in the story is to act as a foil to Mrs. Packletide’s jealous behaviors. After undertaking flight with an Algerian aviator, Bimberton is supremely jealous when Mrs. Packletide steals her limelight by supposedly shooting a tiger in India. Bimberton politely writes an insincere thank you note after receiving Mrs. Packletide’s obnoxious gift of a tiger-claw brooch. However, Bimberton cannot bring herself to also attend the lunch party where Mrs. Packletide proudly displays the tiger-skin—her jealous personality cannot endure witnessing Mrs. Packletide’s social coup.

Loona Bimberton Quotes in Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger

The Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger quotes below are all either spoken by Loona Bimberton or refer to Loona Bimberton. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Edwardian Upper-Class Pretension Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Pantianos Classics edition of Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger published in 2016.
Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger Quotes

The compelling motive for her sudden deviation towards the footsteps of Nimrod was the fact that Loona Bimberton had recently been carried eleven miles in an aeroplane by an Algerian aviator, and talked of nothing else; only a personally procured tiger-skin and a heavy harvest of press photographs could successfully counter that sort of thing.

Related Characters: Mrs. Packletide , Loona Bimberton
Related Symbols: The Tiger
Page Number: 85
Explanation and Analysis:

Therefore did Mrs. Packletide face the cameras with a light heart, and her pictured fame reached from the pages of the “Texas Weekly-Snapshot” to the illustrated Monday supplement of the “Novoe Vremya.”

Related Symbols: The Tiger
Page Number: 86-7
Explanation and Analysis:

“How amused everyone would be if they knew what really happened,” said Louisa Mebbin a few days after the ball. “What do you mean?” asked Mrs. Packletide quickly. “How you shot the goat and frightened the tiger to death,” said Miss Mebbin, with her disagreeably pleasant laugh. “No one would believe it,” said Mrs. Packletide, her face changing colour as rapidly as though it were going through a book of patterns before post-time. “Loona Bimberton would,” said Miss Mebbin.

Related Characters: Mrs. Packletide (speaker), Louisa Mebbin (speaker), Loona Bimberton
Related Symbols: The Tiger, The Weekend Cottage
Page Number: 87
Explanation and Analysis:

Mrs. Packletide indulges in no more big-game shooting. “The incidental expenses are so heavy,” she confides to inquiring friends.

Related Characters: Mrs. Packletide (speaker), Louisa Mebbin, Loona Bimberton
Page Number: 87
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger LitChart as a printable PDF.
Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger PDF

Loona Bimberton Character Timeline in Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger

The timeline below shows where the character Loona Bimberton appears in Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger
Edwardian Upper-Class Pretension Theme Icon
Female Jealousy Theme Icon
...idea of the hunt itself, but for the opportunity it provides to best her rival, Loona Bimberton . Loona has recently gained the attention of London’s high society after flying eleven miles... (full context)
Edwardian Upper-Class Pretension Theme Icon
Female Jealousy Theme Icon
Animals vs. Humans Theme Icon
...already imagine flaunting her success to London’s upper crust—she will host a luncheon, supposedly in Loona Bimberton ’s honor, where her proudly displayed tiger-skin will be the talk of the party. Mrs.... (full context)
Edwardian Upper-Class Pretension Theme Icon
Female Jealousy Theme Icon
Upon Mrs. Packletide’s return to London, Loona Bimberton cannot bear to look at illustrated newspapers for weeks. Bimberton sends an insincere letter of... (full context)