Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger

by

Saki

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The Weekend Cottage Symbol Analysis

The Weekend Cottage Symbol Icon

Louisa Mebbin successfully blackmails Mrs. Packletide into buying her a weekend cottage for six hundred and eighty pounds by threatening to tell the truth about their recent hunt in India. Mrs. Packletide chooses to pay this outrageous sum rather be disgraced in front of her peers—particularly rival socialite Loona Bimberton—if they learn she accidentally shot a goat, not a tiger. The weekend cottage is therefore a symbol of Louisa Mebbin’s cunning, as she bests a woman above her station to gain property and prestige. Mebbin’s not-so-subtle naming of the cottage as “Les Fauves,” meaning “The Wild Beasts” or “The Big Cats,” alongside planting tiger-lilies about the property, is a stark reminder to Mrs. Packletide of the power Mebbin holds over her.

The Weekend Cottage Quotes in Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger

The Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger quotes below all refer to the symbol of The Weekend Cottage. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Edwardian Upper-Class Pretension Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Pantianos Classics edition of Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger published in 2016.
Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger Quotes

Louisa Mebbin adopted a protective elder-sister attitude towards money in general, irrespective of nationality or denomination.

Related Characters: Mrs. Packletide , Louisa Mebbin
Related Symbols: The Weekend Cottage
Page Number: 86
Explanation and Analysis:

“How amused everyone would be if they knew what really happened,” said Louisa Mebbin a few days after the ball. “What do you mean?” asked Mrs. Packletide quickly. “How you shot the goat and frightened the tiger to death,” said Miss Mebbin, with her disagreeably pleasant laugh. “No one would believe it,” said Mrs. Packletide, her face changing colour as rapidly as though it were going through a book of patterns before post-time. “Loona Bimberton would,” said Miss Mebbin.

Related Characters: Mrs. Packletide (speaker), Louisa Mebbin (speaker), Loona Bimberton
Related Symbols: The Tiger, The Weekend Cottage
Page Number: 87
Explanation and Analysis:

Louisa Mebbin’s pretty week-end cottage, christened by her “Les Fauves,” and gay in summer-time with its garden borders of tiger-lilies, is the wonder and admiration of her friends.

Related Characters: Mrs. Packletide , Louisa Mebbin
Related Symbols: The Tiger, The Weekend Cottage
Page Number: 87
Explanation and Analysis:

Mrs. Packletide indulges in no more big-game shooting. “The incidental expenses are so heavy,” she confides to inquiring friends.

Related Characters: Mrs. Packletide (speaker), Louisa Mebbin, Loona Bimberton
Page Number: 87
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Weekend Cottage Symbol Timeline in Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger

The timeline below shows where the symbol The Weekend Cottage appears in Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger
Edwardian Upper-Class Pretension Theme Icon
Female Jealousy Theme Icon
Animals vs. Humans Theme Icon
...Mebbin’s shocking blackmail and her “disagreeably pleasant laugh.” Mebbin casually announces that there is a weekend cottage near Dorking that she fancies, although she does not have the six hundred and eighty... (full context)
Edwardian Upper-Class Pretension Theme Icon
Female Jealousy Theme Icon
Animals vs. Humans Theme Icon
Louisa Mebbin’s friends admire her new weekend cottage , named “Les Fauves” and so “gay in summer-time with its garden borders of tiger-lilies.”... (full context)