Mrs. Warren’s Profession

by

George Bernard Shaw

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Sir George Crofts Character Analysis

A rich aristocrat and heavy-drinking playboy, Sir George Crofts sees that the world caters to people like him and feels no qualms about taking what he can get. He invested forty-thousand pounds in Mrs. Warren’s chain of brothels and is unashamed of where he earns his money. He used to be a lover of Mrs. Warren’s and is unsure whether Vivie is his daughter. Nevertheless, he hopes to marry Vivie.

Sir George Crofts Quotes in Mrs. Warren’s Profession

The Mrs. Warren’s Profession quotes below are all either spoken by Sir George Crofts or refer to Sir George Crofts. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Exploitation of Women Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Grindl Press edition of Mrs. Warren’s Profession published in 2016.
The Author's Apology Quotes

The most vicious man in the play is not in the least a stage villain; indeed, he regards his own moral character with the sincere complacency of a hero of melodrama. The amiable devotee of romance and beauty is shewn at an age which brings out the futilization which these worships are apt to produce if they are made the staple of life instead of the sauce. The attitude of the clever young people to their elders is faithfully represented as one of pitiless ridicule and unsympathetic criticism, and forms a spectacle incredible to those who, when young, were not cleverer than their nearest elders, and painful to those sentimental parents who shrink from the cruelty of youth, which pardons nothing because it knows nothing. In short, the characters and their relations are of a kind that the routineer critic has not yet learned to place; so that their misunderstanding was a foregone conclusion.

Page Number: 34
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 1 Quotes

CROFTS. As to that, theres no resemblance between her and her mother that I can see. I suppose she's not your daughter, is she?
PRAED [rising indignantly] Really, Crofts—!
CROFTS. No offence, Praed. Quite allowable as between two men of the world.
PRAED [recovering himself with an effort and speaking gently and gravely] Now listen to me, my dear Crofts. [He sits down again]. I have nothing to do with that side of Mrs Warren's life, and never had. She has never spoken to me about it; and of course I have never spoken to her about it. Your delicacy will tell you that a handsome woman needs some friends who are not—well, not on that footing with her. The effect of her own beauty would become a torment to her if she could not escape from it occasionally. You are probably on much more confidential terms with Kitty than I am. Surely you can ask her the question yourself.
CROFTS. I have asked her, often enough. But she's so determined to keep the child all to herself that she would deny that it ever had a father if she could. [Rising] I'm thoroughly uncomfortable about it, Praed.
PRAED [rising also] Well, as you are, at all events, old enough to be her father, I don't mind agreeing that we both regard Miss Vivie in a parental way, as a young girl who we are bound to protect and help. What do you say?
CROFTS [aggressively] I'm no older than you, if you come to that.
PRAED. Yes you are, my dear fellow: you were born old. I was born a boy: Ive never been able to feel the assurance of a grownup man in my life. [He folds his chair and carries it to the porch].

Related Characters: Praed (speaker), Sir George Crofts (speaker), Vivie Warren, Kitty Warren (Mrs. Warren)
Page Number: 50-51
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 2 Quotes

MRS WARREN [reflectively] Well, Sam, I don't know. If the girl wants to get married, no good can come of keeping her unmarried.
REV. S. [astounded] But married to him!—your daughter to my son! Only think: it's impossible.
CROFTS. Of course it's impossible. Don't be a fool, Kitty.
MRS WARREN [nettled] Why not? Isn't my daughter good enough for your son?
REV. S. But surely, my dear Mrs Warren, you know the reasons—
MRS WARREN [defiantly] I know no reasons. If you know any, you can tell them to the lad, or to the girl, or to your congregation, if you like.
REV. S. [collapsing helplessly into his chair] You know very well that I couldn't tell anyone the reasons. But my boy will believe me when I tell him there are reasons.
FRANK. Quite right, Dad: he will. But has your boy's conduct ever been influenced by your reasons?

Related Characters: Kitty Warren (Mrs. Warren) (speaker), Frank Gardner (speaker), Sir George Crofts (speaker), Reverend Sam Gardner (speaker), Vivie Warren
Page Number: 62-63
Explanation and Analysis:

CROFTS. Mayn't a man take an interest in a girl?
MRS WARREN. Not a man like you.
CROFTS. How old is she?
MRS WARREN. Never you mind how old she is.
CROFTS. Why do you make such a secret of it?
MRS WARREN. Because I choose.
CROFTS. Well, I'm not fifty yet; and my property is as good as it ever was—
MRS [interrupting him] Yes; because youre as stingy as youre vicious.
CROFTS [continuing] And a baronet isn't to be picked up every day. No other man in my position would put up with you for a mother-in-law. Why shouldn't she marry me?
MRS WARREN. You!
CROFTS. We three could live together quite comfortably. I'd die before her and leave her a bouncing widow with plenty of money. Why not? It's been growing in my mind all the time I've been walking with that fool inside there.
MRS WARREN [revolted] Yes; it's the sort of thing that would grow in your mind.
[He halts in his prowling; and the two look at one another, she steadfastly, with a sort of awe behind her contemptuous disgust: he stealthily, with a carnal gleam in his eye and a loose grin.]
CROFTS [suddenly becoming anxious and urgent as he sees no sign of sympathy in her] Look here, Kitty: youre a sensible woman: you needn't put on any moral airs. I’ll ask no more questions; and you need answer none. I’ll settle the whole property on her; and if you want a checque for yourself on the wedding day, you can name any figure you like—in reason.

Related Characters: Kitty Warren (Mrs. Warren) (speaker), Sir George Crofts (speaker), Vivie Warren, Frank Gardner
Page Number: 68-69
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 3 Quotes

VIVIE. I have shared profits with you: and I admitted you just now to the familiarity of knowing what I think of you.
CROFTS [with serious friendliness] To be sure you did. You won't find me a bad sort: I don't go in for being superfine intellectually; but Ive plenty of honest human feeling; and the old Crofts breed comes out in a sort of instinctive hatred of anything low, in which I'm sure youll sympathize with me. Believe me, Miss Vivie, the world isn't such a bad place as the croakers make out. As long as you don't fly openly in the face of society, society doesn't ask any inconvenient questions; and it makes precious short work of the cads who do. There are no secrets better kept than the secrets everybody guesses. In the class of people I can introduce you to, no lady or gentleman would so far forget themselves as to discuss my business affairs or your mothers. No man can offer you a safer position.

VIVIE [studying him curiously] I suppose you really think youre getting on famously with me.
CROFTS. Well, I hope I may flatter myself that you think better of me than you did at first.
VIVIE [quietly] I hardly find you worth thinking about at all now. When I think of the society that tolerates you, and the laws that protect you! when I think of how helpless nine out of ten young girls would be in the hands of you and my mother! the unmentionable woman and her capitalist bully—

Related Characters: Vivie Warren (speaker), Sir George Crofts (speaker), Kitty Warren (Mrs. Warren)
Page Number: 96
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 4 Quotes

VIVIE. I am sure that if I had the courage I should spend the rest of my life in telling everybody—stamping and branding it into them until they all felt their part in its abomination as I feel mine. There is nothing I despise more than the wicked convention that protects these things by forbidding a woman to mention them. And yet I can't tell you. The two infamous words that describe what my mother is are ringing in my ears and struggling on my tongue; but I can't utter them: the shame of them is too horrible for me. [She buries her face in her hands. The two men, astonished, stare at one another and then at her. She raises her head again desperately and snatches a sheet of paper and a pen]. Here: let me draft you a prospectus.
FRANK. Oh, she's mad. Do you hear, Viv? mad. Come! pull yourself together.
VIVIE. You shall see. [She writes]. "Paid up capital: not less than forty thousand pounds standing in the name of Sir George Crofts, Baronet, the chief shareholder. Premises at Brussels, Ostend, Vienna, and Budapest. Managing director: Mrs Warren"; and now don't let us forget her qualifications: the two words. [She writes the words and pushes the paper to them]. There! Oh no: don't read it: don't! [She snatches it back and tears it to pieces; then seizes her head in her hands and hides her face on the table].
[Frank, who has watched the writing over her shoulder, and opened his eyes very widely at it, takes a card from his pocket; scribbles the two words on it; and silently hands it to Praed, who reads it with amazement and hides it hastily in his pocket.]

Related Characters: Vivie Warren (speaker), Frank Gardner (speaker), Kitty Warren (Mrs. Warren), Praed, Sir George Crofts
Related Symbols: Brussels
Page Number: 109
Explanation and Analysis:
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Sir George Crofts Character Timeline in Mrs. Warren’s Profession

The timeline below shows where the character Sir George Crofts appears in Mrs. Warren’s Profession. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
The Author's Apology
Class, Respectability, Morality, and Complicity Theme Icon
Intergenerational Conflict Theme Icon
...are unusual as heroines because they are practical Englishwomen, not Italian prima donnas. The villain (Crofts) is completely indifferent to his own moral failings. The kind and romantic lover of art... (full context)
Act 1
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Class, Respectability, Morality, and Complicity Theme Icon
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...flashily dressed, bossy, and vulgar, but fun-loving and presentable. She is accompanied by Sir George Crofts, a solidly built man of fifty who is dressed like a fashionable young man. He... (full context)
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Vivie gets more chairs, and Mrs. Warren tells her to let Crofts carry them. She tosses them to him carelessly, then offers her mother tea. Mrs. Warren... (full context)
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Mrs. Warren pretends to laugh but looks concerned, and asks Crofts why Praed is acting this way. Crofts says that Mrs. Warren is afraid of Praed.... (full context)
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Vivie calls for her mother to come inside, and Mrs. Warren leaves Praed and Crofts alone. Crofts asks Praed if he knows who Vivie’s father is. Praed says he doesn’t,... (full context)
Class, Respectability, Morality, and Complicity Theme Icon
Mrs. Warren calls Crofts and Praed into tea. As they are going in, a clever, handsome, charming, well-dressed but... (full context)
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...and tells him that Vivie is an amazingly clever girl—and is in love with him. Crofts pokes his head out of the window and tells Praed to come in. Frank is... (full context)
Act 2
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Crofts and Reverend Gardner enter, talking about politics. Mrs. Warren asks them where Praed and Vivie... (full context)
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Mrs. Warren asks Crofts where he and Praed can stay that night. Crofts says he will stay with the... (full context)
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Class, Respectability, Morality, and Complicity Theme Icon
Intergenerational Conflict Theme Icon
...because Praed will love being on a long walk on a summer night with Vivie. Crofts is offended. Reverend Gardner says that Frank must not think about Vivie romantically. He appeals... (full context)
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Crofts stands up, frowning, and says that Frank cannot marry Vivie. Mrs. Warren and Frank both... (full context)
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...opinion of Mrs. Warren. Frank says that Mrs. Warren’s personality is a bit alarming and Crofts’ is even worse. Vivie says she would kill herself if she thought she was going... (full context)
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Mrs. Warren and Crofts exit the kitchen and come into the room alone together. Crofts had a drink and... (full context)
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Crofts asks how old Vivie is, but Mrs. Warren refuses to answer. Crofts asks why Vivie... (full context)
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Mrs. Warren tells the others that Crofts went outside to smoke a pipe. In a tone of affected maternal concern, Mrs. Warren... (full context)
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...says she will feel bad for him when she breaks it off. She says that Crofts seems to her like a good-for-nothing too. Mrs. Warren is shocked; she says that Vivie... (full context)
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Class, Respectability, Morality, and Complicity Theme Icon
...who their relatives are. She says she has no way of knowing that the sleazy Crofts isn’t her father, but Mrs. Warren says that she is sure that Vivie’s father isn’t... (full context)
Act 3
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Frank says that, although his mother and Praed got along very well, Reverend Gardner and Crofts sat up late drinking and telling shocking stories from their youths. Defending himself, Reverend Gardner... (full context)
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Frank continues, saying that his father must have been terribly drunk to tell Crofts to bring the Warrens over, and that Mrs. Gardner’s sudden decision to go to town... (full context)
Class, Respectability, Morality, and Complicity Theme Icon
...of the house in a panic to say that he sees Mrs. Warren, Vivie, and Crofts approaching. He asks Frank what he should tell them about where Mrs. Gardner is. Frank... (full context)
Class, Respectability, Morality, and Complicity Theme Icon
...suits her, and she is charmed. Frank says everyone should go see the church, and Crofts, Mrs. Warren, and Praed leave with Reverend Gardner to do so. Reverend Gardner insists that... (full context)
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Frank sees Crofts approaching and, swearing, moves away from Vivie. Crofts asks to speak to Vivie alone. Frank... (full context)
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Crofts sits down on the bench next to Vivie. He tells her that he knows he... (full context)
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Crofts says that there are things he could tell her that would change her mind, but... (full context)
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Vivie sits down and asks which business Crofts is talking about. Crofts says it’s not considered a very respectable business. He tells Vivie... (full context)
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Sex, Money, Marriage, Prostitution, and Incest Theme Icon
Class, Respectability, Morality, and Complicity Theme Icon
Vivie stands up, enraged, and tells Crofts that her mother told her the true nature of her business. Crofts swears in anger,... (full context)
Exploitation of Women Theme Icon
Class, Respectability, Morality, and Complicity Theme Icon
Crofts is emboldened to make his case. He says he does exactly what everyone else does;... (full context)
Exploitation of Women Theme Icon
Sex, Money, Marriage, Prostitution, and Incest Theme Icon
Class, Respectability, Morality, and Complicity Theme Icon
...she received from her mother came from. She says she is just as bad as Crofts. Crofts takes this as a sign of friendliness from her. He says that as long... (full context)
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Vivie says she can see that Crofts thinks he is winning her over. Crofts agrees. Vivie bemoans the society that tolerates the... (full context)
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Crofts says he will go, but he has one final thing to tell Frank and Vivie.... (full context)
Act 4
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Sex, Money, Marriage, Prostitution, and Incest Theme Icon
...to town, and they must have been too flabbergasted to ask for details, or maybe Crofts explained what had happened to Mrs. Warren. Frank asks Vivie if she really means to... (full context)
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Frank tells Vivie that they should talk about what Crofts said. He says that he knows that Crofts meant to alter their relationship and make... (full context)
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Vivie asks Frank if he believes his father, and he says he believes him over Crofts. Vivie says it makes no real difference. Frank is surprised. He says he thought that... (full context)
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...and begins to dictate what she is writing: there was a forty-thousand pound investment by Crofts, and there were premises in Brussels, Ostend, Vienna and Budapest. Vivie stops reading her words... (full context)
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Praed tells Frank he is very disappointed in Crofts. Frank replies that now Crofts makes perfect sense to him, but he can’t marry Vivie... (full context)
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...anxiously asks Vivie why she ran away so suddenly. Mrs. Warren says that she wanted Crofts to accompany her to come see Vivie, but he said that she should avoid Vivie. (full context)
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...another. She stands and bids her mother goodbye. Mrs. Warren is shocked. Vivie explains that Crofts told her everything. Mrs. Warren swears in anger at Crofts, but says she thought that... (full context)
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Vivie says she recognizes that her mother is preaching Crofts’s philosophy of life. Mrs. Warren says that she promises she won’t try to make Vivie... (full context)
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...Warren that she is the type of person who admires straightforward, unsentimental people. She thinks Crofts is better than many men like him because he is not ashamed of his behavior. (full context)