Murder on the Orient Express

Murder on the Orient Express

by

Agatha Christie

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Often referred to as simply “the Italian,” Antonio is an Italian-born businessman with dealings in America. Antonio is especially garrulous, and Poirot has to remind him to stay on topic in their interviews surrounding Ratchett’s murder. Foscarelli is an early suspect when M. Bouc singles him out because, as he says, “Italians use the knife,” and Ratchett was clearly stabbed by a knife (twelve times, at that). Antonio was the chauffer for the Armstrong household at the time of Daisy’s kidnapping.

Antonio Foscarelli Quotes in Murder on the Orient Express

The Murder on the Orient Express quotes below are all either spoken by Antonio Foscarelli or refer to Antonio Foscarelli. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Justice Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Harper edition of Murder on the Orient Express published in 2011.
Part 2 Chapter 5 Quotes

"Without a doubt, that is the solution of the mystery. Doubtless he and this Ratchett were in this kidnapping business together. Cassetti is an Italian name. In some way Ratchett did on him what they call the double-cross. The Italian tracks him down, sends him warning letters first, and finally revenges himself upon him in a brutal way. It is all quite simple." Poirot shook his head doubtfully.

Related Characters: M. Bouc (speaker), Hercule Poirot, Antonio Foscarelli
Page Number: 117
Explanation and Analysis:
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Antonio Foscarelli Character Timeline in Murder on the Orient Express

The timeline below shows where the character Antonio Foscarelli appears in Murder on the Orient Express. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 2 Chapter 3
Justice Theme Icon
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
...before, after seeing to Ratchett, he returned to his cabin which he shared with an Italian man . The Italian, according to Masterman, spoke “a kind of English,” as he had spent... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...he was reading in his room with a toothache for much of the night. His Italian roommate also never left the cabin that night. Before dismissing him, Poirot asks him whether there... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 5
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
After Greta Ohlsson’s departure, M. Bouc lobbies Poirot to call the Italian man who roomed with Masterman. M. Bouc is fixated on the Italian because, as he says,... (full context)
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
M. Bouc is untroubled by the clear alibi that Masterman offered for the Italian , but Poirot is described as “twinkling” as he reminds M. Bouc of the inconvenient... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 10
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Poirot observes that his friend M. Bouc will be delighted to call the Italian passenger, Antonio Foscarelli, because M. Bouc sees him as a prime suspect. Interviewing Antonio, Poirot has to... (full context)
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Antonio largely confirms the story of his roommate, Masterman the valet, but in the process scorns... (full context)
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Even though there’s no evidence against Antonio, M. Bouc continues to suspect him, exclaiming “Italians use the knife! And they are great... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 8
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Poirot calls still other passengers into the dining car. First, Antonio Foscarelli appears, looking side to side like a “trapped animal.” He becomes hostile when Poirot... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
While denying the murder, Antonio rails against Ratchett calling him “a pig.” He alludes to some trouble with the police... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Antonio sulks off and Poirot summons Greta Ohlsson, who immediately admits that she was Daisy’s nurse.... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...assistant in the war and apologizes for his deceit. He comes forward largely to defend Antonio, who he describes as a “gentle creature…not like those nasty murdering Italians one reads about.” (full context)