Murder on the Orient Express

Murder on the Orient Express

by

Agatha Christie

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Countess Andrenyi Character Analysis

Countess Andrenyi, a young woman of around twenty, is a Hungarian noble married to Count Andrenyi. It’s revealed at the end of the novel that her real name is Helena Goldenberg, and that she’s Sonia Armstrong’s sister. Countess Adrenyi is the only one connected to the Armstrong family who doesn’t stab Mr. Ratchett, perhaps because her connection to Daisy’s case is too direct. Instead, her husband goes in her place. Countess Andrenyi is also the likely owner of the scarlet kimono.

Countess Andrenyi Quotes in Murder on the Orient Express

The Murder on the Orient Express quotes below are all either spoken by Countess Andrenyi or refer to Countess Andrenyi. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Justice Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Harper edition of Murder on the Orient Express published in 2011.
Part 2 Chapter 7 Quotes

"I am not a Jugo-Slavian detective, Madame. I am an international detective." "You belong to the League of Nations?"

"I belong to the world, Madame," said Poirot dramatically.

Related Characters: Hercule Poirot (speaker), Countess Andrenyi
Page Number: 132
Explanation and Analysis:
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Countess Andrenyi Character Timeline in Murder on the Orient Express

The timeline below shows where the character Countess Andrenyi appears in Murder on the Orient Express. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 2 Chapter 7
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
The Hungarian nobles Count and Countess Andrenyi are next, but only the Count appears. The Count is described as an attractive... (full context)
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...maiden name Goldenberg, and has a spot of grease on it. Both the Count and Countess have “diplomatic status.’ (full context)
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
The Countess appears as asked and confirms her husband’s account that she had been asleep. Poirot asks... (full context)
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
The Countess becomes suspicious when Poirot asks about her dressing gown but reveals that hers is a... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 15
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Next, Poirot searches the Count and Countess’s luggage, which is tricky due to their diplomatic status. They waive it in this case... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 3
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...of his contemplation. He targets a few suggestive details beginning with the grease spot on Countess Andrenyi’s passport. He connects this to the handkerchief monogrammed with an “H.” Ignoring the letter... (full context)
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...spot was placed to obscure an “H” after the handkerchief was found. He concludes that Countess Andrenyi’s true first name is Helena. As evidence, he cites the wet label on the... (full context)
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...by someone whose name began with “H.” Dr. Constantine concludes that this means that the Countess dropped the handkerchief and tried to obscure her name. Poirot disagrees, thinking that the handkerchief... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...Linda also had another daughter, one much younger than Sonia. He concludes from this that Countess Elena Andrenyi is actually Helena Goldenberg, Sonia Armstrong’s younger sister. As a result, Princess Dragomiroff,... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 4
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Poirot and M. Bouc go to the dining car to confront the Count and Countess with this new information. Poirot first offers her the monogrammed handkerchief, which the Countess denies... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
The Countess gives an impassioned excuse that Ratchett had destroyed the three people “I loved best and... (full context)
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...else from Daisy’s childhood, an old woman: “a dragon—a sort of governess…a big red-haired woman.” Helena remembers her as English, then corrects herself that she was Scottish. She remembers her as... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 5
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Alone again, M. Bouc expresses certainty to Poirot that the Countess is guilty, but Poirot reminds him that there was another option for the owner of... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 7
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...could find further employment as a governess. Poirot asks how she could not have recognized Countess Andrenyi when she had lived with her. In response, Mary gives a meandering response mentioning... (full context)
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...out Ms. Debenham’s former occupation. Poirot had already suspected Ms. Debenham’s position when questioning the Countess about Daisy’s governess. The Countess described someone the opposite of Ms. Debenham, and when she... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 9
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...as elements expressly designed to confuse him. He speculates that it may have belonged to Countess Andrenyi. (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...the person most likely to have killed Ratchett had no part it in it, namely Countess Andrenyi. The Count Andrenyi took her “place” and stabbed Ratchett. Poirot further identifies Hildegarde Schmidt... (full context)