Murder on the Orient Express

Murder on the Orient Express

by

Agatha Christie

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Dr. Constantine Character Analysis

Dr. Constantine is a Greek doctor traveling on the Orient Express, whose services are required to determine the nature of Mr. Ratchett’s death. He observes that many different people may have inflicted Mr. Ratchett with his twelve stab wounds. He attends many of the suspect interviews with detective Hercule Poirot.

Dr. Constantine Quotes in Murder on the Orient Express

The Murder on the Orient Express quotes below are all either spoken by Dr. Constantine or refer to Dr. Constantine . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Justice Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Harper edition of Murder on the Orient Express published in 2011.
Part 1 Chapter 7 Quotes

"Perfectly," said Poirot. "The matter begins to clear itself up wonderfully! The murderer was a man of great strength—he was feeble—it was a woman—it was a right-handed person—it was a left- handed person. Ah! c'est rigolo, tout ça!"

Related Characters: Hercule Poirot (speaker), Dr. Constantine
Page Number: 65
Explanation and Analysis:

"A woman's handkerchief," said the doctor. "Our friend the chef de train was right. There is a woman concerned in this."

"And most conveniently she leaves her handkerchief behind!" said Poirot. "Exactly as it happens in the books and on the films—and to make things even easier for us, it is marked with an initial."

Related Characters: Hercule Poirot (speaker), Dr. Constantine (speaker)
Page Number: 67
Explanation and Analysis:

“It is the psychology I seek, not the fingerprint or the cigarette ash. But in this case I would welcome a little scientific assistance. This compartment is full of clues, but can I be sure that those clues are really what they seem to be?"

"I do not quite understand you, M. Poirot."

"Well, to give you an example—we find a woman's handkerchief. Did a woman drop it? Or did a man, committing the crime, say to himself: 'I will make this look like a woman's crime.

Related Characters: Hercule Poirot (speaker), Dr. Constantine (speaker)
Page Number: 69
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3 Chapter 9 Quotes

Then everyone jumped as Dr. Constantine suddenly hit the table a blow with his fist. "But no," he said. "No, no, and again no! That is an explanation that will not hold water. It is deficient in a dozen minor points. The crime was not committed so—M. Poirot must know that perfectly well."

Related Characters: Dr. Constantine (speaker), Hercule Poirot
Page Number: 273
Explanation and Analysis:
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Dr. Constantine Character Timeline in Murder on the Orient Express

The timeline below shows where the character Dr. Constantine appears in Murder on the Orient Express. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1 Chapter 5
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...they can move again. M. Bouc introduces the Greek doctor from the adjacent train car, Dr. Constantine , who estimates the murder took place between twelve and two that morning. (full context)
Part 1 Chapter 7
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Dr. Constantine concludes that Ratchett was stabbed twelve times, but some blows are glancing while others are... (full context)
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...a pipe-cleaner, deemed a “masculine clue,” and a pocket watch stopped precisely at 12:45, which Dr. Constantine assumes is the time of the murder, though Poirot is skeptical. (full context)
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Dr. Constantine raises the question of entrances and exits. The door to the hallway was bolted and... (full context)
Part 1 Chapter 8
Justice Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Dining with M. Bouc and Dr. Constantine , Poirot announces that he’s discovered Mr. Ratchett’s real name: Cassetti, the man responsible for... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 13
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Poirot, M. Bouc, and Dr. Constantine take stock of the evidence. They’re faced with a “small, dark man,” a prime suspect,... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 14
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...the knife in Mrs. Hubbard’s bag. It’s a cheap knife in the oriental style which Dr. Constantine says could have been used for any of Ratchett’s twelve wounds. Poirot says in mock-weariness,... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 1
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Poirot, M. Bouc, and Dr. Constantine reconvene. M. Bouc again stresses his confusion with the case and the opinion that none... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 2
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...name is Hermione), and Hildegarde Schmidt. To this, Poirot responds, “Ah! And of those three?” Dr. Constantine notes that it is expensive and so he thinks it belongs to the American Mrs.... (full context)
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Then there’s the matter of the pipe-cleaner. Dr. Constantine cites Poirot saying, “two clues is too much carelessness.” He reasons that the handkerchief may... (full context)
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Dr. Constantine then raises the issue of multiple murderers acting independently. He cites as evidence Ratchett’s wounds,... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 3
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
The three men think, but neither M. Bouc nor Dr. Constantine think very productively and are distracted by private, unrelated thoughts. Poirot awakens from his reverie... (full context)
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...handkerchief, Poirot claims that it was inadvertently dropped by someone whose name began with “H.” Dr. Constantine concludes that this means that the Countess dropped the handkerchief and tried to obscure her... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 5
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
...the doctor to determine whether it’s physically possible that she inflicted the wounds on Ratchett. Dr. Constantine concedes that it’s possible the “feebler ones” were inflicted by the Princess. Frustrated, M. Bouc... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 8
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
M. Bouc and Dr. Constantine marvel at the carousel of emotional confessions and the coincidence of each passenger having a... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 9
Justice Theme Icon
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
...He plans to give two solutions to the crime and then asks M. Bouc and Dr. Constantine to “judge” which is the correct one. (full context)
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...and was afraid to be accused of the crime. Some seem satisfied by this, but Dr. Constantine exclaims, “No, no, and again no! That is an explanation that will not hold water.” (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Poirot defers to M. Bouc and Dr. Constantine , who both suddenly decide that Poirot’s first theory is more credible after all, and... (full context)