Murder on the Orient Express

Murder on the Orient Express

by

Agatha Christie

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Mrs. Hubbard is an older American woman who presumably travels to support charitable and educational causes abroad. Her endless gossip and nosiness, as well as her cultural chauvinism, marks her as distinctively American to some of the other passengers. Poirot later identifies her as the famous actress Linda Arden, Daisy Armstrong’s grandmother. Hubbard is revealed as a linchpin of the conspiracy to kill Ratchett. The passengers enter his compartment through hers, and her mock-hysteria on discovering new pieces of evidence is responsible for misleading Poirot and taking heat off the other conspirators.

Mrs. Hubbard Quotes in Murder on the Orient Express

The Murder on the Orient Express quotes below are all either spoken by Mrs. Hubbard or refer to Mrs. Hubbard. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Justice Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Harper edition of Murder on the Orient Express published in 2011.
Part 1 Chapter 3 Quotes

"It is—they must—how do you say?—serve the water of the country," explained the sheep-faced lady.

"Well, it seems queer to me." She looked distastefully at the heap of small change on the table in front of her. "Look at all this peculiar stuff he's given me. Dinars or something. Just a lot of rubbish, it looks like!”

Related Characters: Mrs. Hubbard (speaker), Greta Ohlsson (speaker)
Page Number: 29-30
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3 Chapter 9 Quotes

“I would have stabbed that man twelve times willingly. It wasn't only that he was responsible for my daughter's death and her child's and that of the other child who might have been alive and happy now. It was more than that: there had been other children kidnapped before Daisy, and there might be others in the future. Society had condemned him—we were only carrying out the sentence.”

Page Number: 286
Explanation and Analysis:
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Murder on the Orient Express PDF

Mrs. Hubbard Character Timeline in Murder on the Orient Express

The timeline below shows where the character Mrs. Hubbard appears in Murder on the Orient Express. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1 Chapter 4
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
...comfortable with each other. Colonel Arbuthnot talks at length with Hector Macqueen about politics while Mrs. Hubbard takes the somewhat helpless Swedish woman under her wing, offering aspirin for a headache. Mrs.... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...passes Ratchett in his cabin, who gives him a hostile look and shuts the door. Mrs. Hubbard gossips with Poirot about Mr. Ratchett, noting that she “wouldn’t be surprised if that man... (full context)
Part 1 Chapter 5
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...hears a nearby bell ring a few times before the conductor answers it. He hears Mrs. Hubbard talk to the conductor, describing the conversation as 90% Mrs. Hubbard speaking. (full context)
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
When he arrives, the conductor explains to Poirot that Mrs. Hubbard believes she saw a man in her cabin and no objections on the conductor’s part... (full context)
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
...commotion because the train is stopped indefinitely in a blizzard. The Swedish woman is crying, Mrs. Hubbard complains about the “foreigners” in charge of the train and refers to their present location... (full context)
Part 1 Chapter 7
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...exits. The door to the hallway was bolted and the door to the adjacent cabin, Mrs. Hubbard’s, was bolted on the other side. Poirot notes that this is like an escape artist’s... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 1
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...Michel talked with another conductor in the adjacent train car until he was summoned by Mrs. Hubbard . He attended to her and then to Poirot, and then sat in his place... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 4
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
The next interview is with Mrs. Hubbard , the older American woman, who immediately demands to see the person “in authority.” Mrs.... (full context)
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
After Pierre Michel checked her cabin and found nothing, Mrs. Hubbard reports that she was frustrated that he kept trying to “soothe” her rather than taking... (full context)
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...her whether the door to Ratchett’s room was bolted when she went to sleep, and Mrs. Hubbard says that she had asked the Swedish woman to confirm that it was locked. She... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Mrs. Hubbard had spoken to the Swedish woman, who was upset because she had mistakenly entered Ratchett’s... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Poirot then tells Mrs. Hubbard about Ratchett’s connection to the Armstrong case, and while she’s familiar with it, calling Cassetti... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 5
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Poirot moves on to the Swedish woman who had talked to Mrs. Hubbard , a woman named Greta Ohlsson. She’s a trained nurse traveling to stay with family... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 6
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...to the next witness, Poirot and M. Bouc ask Pierre Michel about the button that Mrs. Hubbard found. Pierre flies into a panic when the implication becomes clear to him, but insists... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 13
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...with a missing scarlet kimono and a missing conductor’s uniform, one lacking the button that Mrs. Hubbard found in her cabin. To that end, Poirot resolves to search each passenger’s luggage. He... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 14
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Making his way past the commotion in front of Mrs. Hubbard ’s cabin, Poirot finds the knife in Mrs. Hubbard’s bag. It’s a cheap knife in... (full context)
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Mrs. Hubbard describes more of her journey, expressing displeasure with Istanbul as a “tumble-down city.” Poirot takes... (full context)
Part 2 Chapter 15
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...Ms. Debenham, performing a quick search of Greta’s luggage and sending her to minister to Mrs. Hubbard . Ms. Debenham suspects that he wanted to interview her privately. Poirot confronts her with... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 2
Detective Methods and Inner Lives Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
M. Bouc narrows it down to Mrs. Hubbard , Mary Debenham (whose middle name is Hermione), and Hildegarde Schmidt. To this, Poirot responds,... (full context)
Part 3 Chapter 9
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
...on the train at Belgrade or Vincovci, With the pass-key, he entered Ratchett’s cabin through Mrs. Hubbard’s, stabbed him twelve times with the knife, abandoned the uniform in Hildegarde’s luggage, and left... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
National Identity and International Connections Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
All of this requires an artist to choreograph, and Poirot identifies the mastermind as Linda Arden , at which point Mrs. Hubbard drops her false identity and introduces herself as Linda... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Deception and Genre Expectations Theme Icon
Linda Arden goes on to fill in the gaps of the conspiracy. Pierre Michel had been the... (full context)