My Name is Red

My Name is Red

My Name is Red Chapter 21 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Enishte admits that he plans to ask Black to write the stories for the book. Enishte tells Black that, along with the three miniaturists, he has completed most of the book’s illustrations, including a depiction of Death, a tree, Satan, a horse, a dog, and a coin. Enishte considers telling Black he wants him to marry Shekure, knowing that they are planning to elope. After Friday prayers, the two discuss shadow, the most important Venetian technique. As Enishte explains how it is done, he suspects that Black might want to kill him for deviating from the traditional painting style, as well as for keeping Shekure from him. Enishte shows Black the picture of Death and tells him it was painted by Butterfly, whom Master Osman has been in love with for years. Enishte says he knows that, after they leave his house at night, the miniaturists go to the coffeehouse and mock him.
This passage further explores Enishte’s ambivalent relationship with the book, as well as with the other miniaturists and with Black. Although Enishte has secured a powerful and respected position in society, he is mocked by the miniaturists and increasingly fears that the murderer is coming for his life. Furthermore, even his close relationship with Black is marred by Enishte’s suspicion that Black plans to go behind his back and elope with Shekure. In this light, Enishte is a rather sympathetic character who finds himself trapped between the opposing views and desires of others.
Themes
Storytelling, Identity, and Perspective Theme Icon
Creation vs. Representation Theme Icon
Life, Death, and Consciousness Theme Icon
Virtue vs. Sin Theme Icon
Love, Desire, and Greed Theme Icon
Enishte shows Black all the illustrations except the last one, which he cannot finish. They discuss the possibility that Elegant was murdered by someone who was jealous of his wealth. As Enishte walks Black out, he notices Shekure standing in her white gown “looking like a ghost” and he asks her if she really wants to marry Black. Shekure says that she doesn’t because Enishte does not want her to. However, she admits that she now feels certain that her husband is dead. Enishte says that if he dies, he wants Shekure to ensure that the book is finished, and she promises that she will. Enishte notices that Shekure is smiling slightly, and asks if she and Black have been communicating with secret signals. Shekure insists that she hasn’t, though Enishte does not believe her.
Enishte is clearly preoccupied with death, as shown by the fact that he perceives Shekure “looking like a ghost” in her white dress. At the same time, Shekure herself has been thinking about the same subject ever since the dream of her husband’s death. Although Shekure loves her father and makes an effort to appear virtuous and loyal to him, in reality she is lying about her relationship with Black. With each passing moment, Enishte’s paranoia seems more and more justified.
Themes
Storytelling, Identity, and Perspective Theme Icon
Creation vs. Representation Theme Icon
Life, Death, and Consciousness Theme Icon
Virtue vs. Sin Theme Icon
Love, Desire, and Greed Theme Icon