Nicomachean Ethics

by

Aristotle

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Nicomachean Ethics can help.
Prudence is a prerequisite to virtue. Aristotle defines prudence as the ability to “deliberate finely […] about what sorts of things promote living well in general.” In other words, discerning the mean in a given circumstance requires prudence.
Get the entire Nicomachean Ethics LitChart as a printable PDF.
Nicomachean Ethics PDF

Prudence Term Timeline in Nicomachean Ethics

The timeline below shows where the term Prudence appears in Nicomachean Ethics. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1
The Nature and Pursuit of Happiness Theme Icon
Virtues and the Mean Theme Icon
...the difference between virtues. Some virtues are called virtues of thought (like wisdom, comprehension, and prudence), and some virtues are called virtues of character (like generosity and temperance). (full context)
Book 6
The Nature and Pursuit of Happiness Theme Icon
Virtues and the Mean Theme Icon
...Aristotle identifies five states in which the soul grasps the truth: scientific knowledge, craft knowledge, prudence, wisdom, and understanding. Both understanding and scientific knowledge are concerned with learnable principles that don’t... (full context)
Virtues and the Mean Theme Icon
...to reach (which is a base one); whereas good deliberation must accord with what’s beneficial. Prudence is important because virtue is a state in accord with correct reason, and prudence is... (full context)
Book 7
Virtues and the Mean Theme Icon
Virtue and Community Life Theme Icon
Book 7, Chapter 10. Aristotle adds that an incontinent person cannot be prudent at the same time, because prudent people act on their knowledge, but incontinent people don’t;... (full context)