No Sugar

No Sugar

by

Jack Davis

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One of two black trackers employed by Neal at the Moore River Native Settlement, the other being Bluey. Billy follows Neal’s orders, but also spends time with the Millimurra-Munday family as friends. Billy was originally from the Northern part of Western Australia, but his community was destroyed during the Oombulgarri Massacre. Billy’s allegiance is split between his own indigenous identity and the authority of Neal and the Matron, but he generally privileges his duty to his job over his duty to himself or his fellow Aboriginal Australians.

Billy Kimberley Quotes in No Sugar

The No Sugar quotes below are all either spoken by Billy Kimberley or refer to Billy Kimberley. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Currency Press edition of No Sugar published in 1998.
Act 2, Scene 6 Quotes

[He picks up inji sticks. The Nyoongahs, SAM, JIMMY and JOE, dance with them. BILLY joins in. They dance with increasing speed and energy, stamping their feet, whirling in front of the fire, their bodies appearing and disappearing as the paint catches the firelight. The dance becomes faster and more frantic until finally SAM lets out a yell and they collapse, dropping back to their positions around the fire. JIMMY coughs and pants painfully.]

[…]

BILLY: This country got plenty good dance, eh?

BLUEY: Wee-ah!

JIMMY: Ah, yuart, not too many left now. Nearly all finish.

BILLY: No, no, no. You song man, you fella dance men. This still your country. [Flinging his arms wide] You, you, you, you listen! Gudeeah make ’em fences, windmill, make ’em road for motor car, big house, cut ’em down trees. Still your country! Not like my country, finish… finish.

[He sits in silence. They watch him intently. JOE puts wood on the fire. He speaks slowly.]

BILLY: Kuliyah. [Miming pulling a trigger, grunting] Gudeeah bin kill ’em. Finish, kill ’em. Big mob, 1926, kill ’em big mob my country.

Related Characters: James “Jimmy” Munday (speaker), Billy Kimberley (speaker), Bluey (speaker), Sam Millimurra, Joe Millimurra
Page Number: 66-67
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 2, Scene 8 Quotes

MATRON: Apparently you told [Mary] she was going to work at the hospital and stay in the nurses’ quarters.

NEAL: Who told you that? [Yelling] Billy!

BILLY: [off] Comin’, boss.

MATRON: It seems she was terrified at the prospect of working in the hospital.

NEAL: They’re all scared of the dead.

MATRON: I think she was scared of the living.

Related Characters: Mr N. S. Neal (speaker), Matron Neal (speaker), Billy Kimberley (speaker), Mary Daragurru
Page Number: 72-73
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire No Sugar LitChart as a printable PDF.
No Sugar PDF

Billy Kimberley Character Timeline in No Sugar

The timeline below shows where the character Billy Kimberley appears in No Sugar. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, Scene 3
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Jimmy, Billy, and Frank return to camp drunk. Milly and Gran follow behind. Jimmy complains about the... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 1
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Language and Culture Theme Icon
...Moore River Native Settlement. Jimmy is working on creating shade for the family’s tent when Billy approaches. The family is shocked when Billy, who is an Aboriginal man, reveals that he... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 3
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...the Long Pool Camp in the Moore River Settlement, the Millimurra-Mundays play, work, and rest. Billy arrives with Matron Neal, Topsy, and Mary. Matron Neal examines the family for scabies, the... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
...The family remains silent for a moment, before Sam admits that they have a handful. Billy tells the Matron the family has seven, causing Joe, David, and Cissie to curse at... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 5
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...the dogs are the only true health hazard in the camp. Neal agrees, and calls Billy into the room. Neal grabs a gun and ammunition from his cabinet, and tells Billy... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 6
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...ceremony, sit by a fire. Joe  enters with firewood, and tends to it. Bluey and Billy enter and remove their shirts. They paint themselves with the same wilgi paint that Jimmy... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
Language and Culture Theme Icon
Billy comments that this country has good dances. Jimmy responds that he feels there isn’t a... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
Billy is quiet for am moment and then tells the story of the Oombulgarri Massacre of... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Language and Culture Theme Icon
Billy has some family left, but none of them will return to the land where the... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 8
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Neal calls Billy into the room and tells him to chase down the runaways. Billy takes his whip... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 9
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
As Mary and Joe sit, Billy sneaks up on them from the cover of the tree line. He tries to grab... (full context)
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Billy says Mr. Neal wants them to return, but Joe doesn’t care. Joe grabs Billy’s whip... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 10
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Billy limps back to the Superintendent’s Office in Moore River. David, Cissie, and Topsy follow him... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
Billy enters Neal’s office. Neal and the Matron, who enters behind Billy, are shocked by Billy’s... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
...decides the handcuffs are a job for the blacksmith. The Matron tells Neal to send Billy to the hospital, where she can examine him and give him dinner. The Matron and... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 1
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
In the background, as Sister Eileen teaches, David enters the stage. Billy comes behind him and grabs his shoulder. David was skipping class to go swimming, and... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
Language and Culture Theme Icon
Sister Eileen chastises Billy for beating David. Although David was cutting class, she tells Billy “we don’t hit people... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 2
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
The Matron enters Neal’s office and announces that Billy and Mary, who is visibly pregnant, have arrived. Mr. Neal immediately dismisses the Matron, who... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Billy brings Mary into Neal’s office but is ordered to wait outside while they talk. Mr.... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 5
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
...Australia Day, 1934. Neville, Neal, and the Matron sit on a platform above the crowd. Billy and Bluey, wearing ill-fitting new uniforms, stand beside an Australian Flag. Sister Eileen delivers a... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...towards him and asks the Matron for help. She takes his condition seriously and orders Billy and Bluey to help take him to the hospital. The group exits as Neal assures... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 9
Language and Culture Theme Icon
Neal calls Billy in to act as witness. He asks if Billy understands the paper. Billy does not.... (full context)
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Billy walks Joe out and asks what the document said. Joe explains that it will let... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Billy tells Joe to watch out for Mary, as she is still an Oomboolgari girl even... (full context)