No Sugar

No Sugar

by

Jack Davis

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Sam Millimurra Character Analysis

A middle-aged Aboriginal man. He is Milly’s husband, and Joe, Cissie, and David’s father. Sam is technically the patriarch of the family, but much of the of the parenting and decision making is done by Milly and Gran. Sam always puts family first, most frequently contributing to his family by catching meat for dinner or else working on nearby farms in exchange for food or supplies. Sam and his brother-in-law Jimmy have a complicated relationship. Sam is more willing to cooperate and comply with the white officials who oversee his life, whereas Jimmy is more rebellious. Still, both men care about the wellbeing of the family and are willing to overlook their differences in the service of their relatives.

Sam Millimurra Quotes in No Sugar

The No Sugar quotes below are all either spoken by Sam Millimurra or refer to Sam Millimurra. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Currency Press edition of No Sugar published in 1998.
Act 1, Scene 1 Quotes

JOE: ‘The—blood—was stirred…as if by a trumpet… by the history-ical…Headed by a tab-leau… […] ‘…Commemorating the pioneers whose lives…’ […] ‘…Were a steadfast performance of duty in the face of difficulty and danger. With them was a reminder of the dangers they faced, in the shape of three lorries…carrying Aborigines.

[They all stop what they are doing and listen.]

[…]

JOE: All right! ‘…Dancing…to a brass-band.’

SAM: Koorawoorung! Nyoongahs corrobereein’ to a wetjala’s brass band!
JIMMY: Ah! That beats everythin’: stupid bloody blackfellas…You fellas, you know why them wetjalas marchin’ down the street, eh? I’ll tell youse why. ‘Cause them bastards took our country and them blackfellas dancin’ for ‘em. Bastards!

[…]

JOE: ‘The pag…page…page-ant pre-sented a picture of Western Australia’s pre-sent condition of hopeful optimum-optimis-tic prosperity, and gave some idea of what men mean when they talk about the soul of the nation.’

SAM: Sounds like bullshit to me.

Related Characters: James “Jimmy” Munday (speaker), Sam Millimurra (speaker), Joe Millimurra (speaker)
Page Number: 15-16
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 1, Scene 6 Quotes

CISSIE: [holding her throat] Hurts, Mum, here; hurts when I cough.

MILLY: Well, no school for you today, my girl. [To SAM] You ain’t goin’ post cuttin’ today, and David, you walk to school.

DAVID: Aw, Mum!

MILLY: Don’t, ‘Aw Mum’ me. Joe, you git on that bike and go and ask Uncle Herbie for a lend of his horse and cart. We takin’ her to the doctor straight away.

[JOE takes the bike from DAVID.]

SAM: Aw Mill, can’t you and Mum take her? I only want another hundred posts and I’ll have enough boondah to pay me fine.

Related Characters: Milly Millimurra (speaker), Sam Millimurra (speaker), Cissie Millimurra (speaker), David Millimurra (speaker), Joe Millimurra
Page Number: 37-38
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 2, Scene 6 Quotes

[He picks up inji sticks. The Nyoongahs, SAM, JIMMY and JOE, dance with them. BILLY joins in. They dance with increasing speed and energy, stamping their feet, whirling in front of the fire, their bodies appearing and disappearing as the paint catches the firelight. The dance becomes faster and more frantic until finally SAM lets out a yell and they collapse, dropping back to their positions around the fire. JIMMY coughs and pants painfully.]

[…]

BILLY: This country got plenty good dance, eh?

BLUEY: Wee-ah!

JIMMY: Ah, yuart, not too many left now. Nearly all finish.

BILLY: No, no, no. You song man, you fella dance men. This still your country. [Flinging his arms wide] You, you, you, you listen! Gudeeah make ’em fences, windmill, make ’em road for motor car, big house, cut ’em down trees. Still your country! Not like my country, finish… finish.

[He sits in silence. They watch him intently. JOE puts wood on the fire. He speaks slowly.]

BILLY: Kuliyah. [Miming pulling a trigger, grunting] Gudeeah bin kill ’em. Finish, kill ’em. Big mob, 1926, kill ’em big mob my country.

Related Characters: James “Jimmy” Munday (speaker), Billy Kimberley (speaker), Bluey (speaker), Sam Millimurra, Joe Millimurra
Page Number: 66-67
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 4, Scene 10 Quotes

DAVID: Eh, brother, you want my pocket knife? You might need it.

JOE: No, Brudge, I can use glass if I wanna gut a rabbit.

[SAM hands JOE a home-made knife.]

SAM: Here, son, take this one.

JOE: No, I’ll be all right.

SAM: Take it. I can git another bit of steel and make another one. Here, take it.

[Magpies squawk. GRAN begins to sing. They farewell each member of the family, then walk off into the distance.]

Related Characters: Sam Millimurra (speaker), Joe Millimurra (speaker), David Millimurra (speaker), Gran Munday, Mary Daragurru
Page Number: 109
Explanation and Analysis:
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Sam Millimurra Character Timeline in No Sugar

The timeline below shows where the character Sam Millimurra appears in No Sugar. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, Scene 1
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
...and the Western Australia Historical society. The play begins in 1930 at Government Well, as Sam, Joe, Gran, Milly, David, and Cissie eat breakfast and prepare for the day. (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Language and Culture Theme Icon
...Aborigines” who were dancing to a brass band. The whole family listens as Joe reads. Sam and Jimmy are upset by the idea that Aboriginal men and women would volunteer to... (full context)
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...makes him change and then sends David and Cissie to school. Milly tells Joe and Sam they’ll have to catch meat for dinner, and then exits the stage with Gran. (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
Joe continues to read the paper to Sam. The paper describes “Australia’s present condition of hopeful optimistic prosperity.” Sam is unimpressed. Sam and... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 3
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Language and Culture Theme Icon
...a young choirboy, “pinchin’ things off other people’s clothes lines.” The conversation shifts to how Sam and Milly met in the same church where Jimmy used to sing. They were married... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...over to the bike, and Jimmy, drunk and aggressive, accidentally hits him in the nose. Sam gets up and joins the fray, pushing Jimmy and telling him to cut it out.... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 4
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Jimmy and Sam are locked in adjacent jail cells. The Sergeant and Constable catalogue their belongings, including a... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
Sam attempts to be quiet and cooperative, while Jimmy continues to harass his captors, reciting poems,... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 5
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Jimmy, Sam, and Frank stand trial in a courthouse in Northam. The Sergeant and a local farmer,... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Sam and Jimmy are called in next. Jimmy is slow to enter; he claims he was... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
The Sergeant announces that Jimmy and Sam were arrested when they were drunk the night before. The Sergeant claims Jimmy was “noisy... (full context)
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
...had previous offenses related to alcohol, JP gives him three months imprisonment with hard labor. Sam, who has no criminal record except for a time he was caught drinking with Jimmy,... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 6
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...Gran builds a fire, David prepares for school, and Milly cooks breakfast—fried fat and damper. Sam complains that Jimmy, who is still in prison, is probably eating better than he is.... (full context)
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...concerned. Milly sends Joe off to borrow a horse and cart from their neighbor, Herbie. Sam has been cutting posts for the neighbor for money, and is close to paying off... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 8
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
At the Government Well Reservation, Jimmy repairs shoes as Gran and Milly sew. Sam and Joe enter and sit. Joe has brought back fat, potatoes, and onions to cook... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 10
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Language and Culture Theme Icon
...The group is interrupted by the Sergeant and Constable, who arrive with Jimmy, Joe, and Sam. The Sergeant announces that he has warrants for the family’s “arrest and apprehension.” Milly is... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Sick of arguing, the Sergeant threatens to charge the family with resisting arrest. Sam and his family will go by the road, but Jimmy, who has a heart condition,... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 1
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Jimmy, Milly, and Sam discuss dinner. There’s a soup kitchen on the Reservation, but Jimmy, who has already been... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 3
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
...how many dogs the family is keeping. The family remains silent for a moment, before Sam admits that they have a handful. Billy tells the Matron the family has seven, causing... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 6
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
It is evening on the Moore River Native Settlement. Jimmy and Sam, who have painted themselves for a corroboree ceremony, sit by a fire. Joe  enters with... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Language and Culture Theme Icon
Sam begins a group dance. He plays on the clapsticks and Bluey plays the didgeridoo. After... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 7
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...gives Joe a bit of damper, which is all she has. Joe bids her and Sam goodbye, though Milly cautions him not to wake his siblings as the “less they know... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 1
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...nothing left. Joe points out rocks where he and Cissie used to play, and finds Sam’s rabbit trap, Jimmy’s wine bottle, and the remains of David’s bike buried in the scorched... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 2
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...stay in the nurse’s quarters, but she says she wants to stay with Milly and Sam. He pressures her, but Mary refuses twice more, infuriating Neal. Billy walks in and tells... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 3
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Mary stumbles into the Long Pool Camp, where Milly, Sam, Jimmy, and Gran are going about their day. Milly can immediately tell something is wrong;... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 5
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
...like the white man, to be treated equally, not worse, not better, under the law.” Sam asks Jimmy what Neville is even talking about. Jimmy says Neville is just “talkin’ outta... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 6
Racism, Discrimination, and Colonial Violence  Theme Icon
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Milly and Sam approach Neal’s office. They ask if Joe can come to the funeral. Neal says no,... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 7
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
David wakes up and comes to look at his new nephew. Sam rushes in to meet his grandson. The Matron finally arrives, but Mary refuses to hand... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 8
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Cissie, David, Milly, and Sam are all quietly playing games. Mary is watching over the Baby. Suddenly, they all hear... (full context)
Government, Civilization, and Religion Theme Icon
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
...in prison, which they gave to him when he got out. He gives Gran and Sam tobacco, Cissie hair ribbons, David a knife, and Milly a needle and cotton. He gives... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 10
White Australians vs. the Aboriginal Family Unit Theme Icon
Language and Culture Theme Icon
...warns him to be careful. David offers Joe his pocketknife, but Joe turns him down. Sam gives Joe a homemade knife, and insists his son take it with him. (full context)