Noli Me Tangere

Noli Me Tangere

Captain Tiago (Don Santiago de los Santos) Character Analysis

A Filipino socialite and well-respected member of the country’s wealthy elite. Close with high-ranking clergy members like Father Salví and Father Dámaso, Captain Tiago is one of the richest property owners in Manila and San Diego. He is concerned with making sure his daughter, María Clara, marries an affluent man with ample social capital, which is one of the reasons he so quickly abandons his support of Ibarra when the friars disgrace the young man’s name. As for his own disgrace, Captain Tiago is not actually María Clara’s biological father—rather, his wife had an affair with Father Dámaso before dying in childbirth. This is perhaps why he is so concerned with keeping up the appearance of respectability, for his own wife dishonored him. As such, he is blind to the vapid posturing of people like Doctor de Espadaña, a fraudulent doctor for rich people, and his wife, Doña Victorina, an obvious social climber. When they present their nephew Linares as a possible new match for María Clara, Captain Tiago is quick to assent, thinking that such a pairing will ensure respectability.

Captain Tiago (Don Santiago de los Santos) Quotes in Noli Me Tangere

The Noli Me Tangere quotes below are all either spoken by Captain Tiago (Don Santiago de los Santos) or refer to Captain Tiago (Don Santiago de los Santos). For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Books edition of Noli Me Tangere published in 2006.
Chapter 6 Quotes

That he was at peace with God was beyond question, and almost dogmatic. There is no reason to be at odds with God when one is at peace on earth, when one has never communicated with God, nor has ever lent him money. He never prayed to God, even when he was in the direst of straits. He was rich, and his gold prayed for him. For masses and alms, God had created powerful, supercilious priests. For novenas and rosaries, God in his infinite goodwill had created the poor, for the benefit of the rich, in fact, since for one peso poor people would recite the sixteen mysteries and read all the holy books, including the Hebrew bible, if one increased the payment. If in a time of great need one required the intervention of heaven and could not find at hand even a Chinese red candle, he would direct himself to the saints to whom he devoted himself, promising them many things in order to obligate them to him and to end up convincing them of the goodwill of his desires.

Page Number: 35
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Chapter 42 Quotes

The servants all had to call them by their new titles and, as a result as well, the fringes, the layers of rice powder, the ribbons, and the lace all increased in quantity. She looked with increasing disfavor than ever before on her poor, less fortunate countrywomen, whose husbands were of a different category from her own. Every day she felt more dignified and elevated and, following this path at the end of a year she began to think of herself of divine origin.

Nevertheless, these sublime thoughts did not keep her from getting older and more ridiculous every day. Every time Captain Tiago ran into her and remembered that he had courted her in vain, he would right away send a peso to the church for a mass of thanksgiving. Despite this, Captain Tiago had great respect for her husband and his title “Specialist in All Types of Diseases” and he would listen attentively to the few sentences his stuttering permitted him to utter successfully. For this reason, and because he didn’t visit absolutely everyone like other doctors did, Captain Tiago chose him to attend his daughter.

Page Number: 284
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Captain Tiago (Don Santiago de los Santos) Character Timeline in Noli Me Tangere

The timeline below shows where the character Captain Tiago (Don Santiago de los Santos) appears in Noli Me Tangere. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: A Gathering
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In late October, Don Santiago de los Santos, who is known as Captain Tiago, throws a large dinner party in Manila. He is very wealthy and, as such, the... (full context)
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...upon such a delicate matter.” Changing the subject, one of the civilians asks about Captain Tiago, the host of the party. Dámaso says that there is “no need for introductions” because... (full context)
Chapter 2: Crisóstomo Ibarra
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Turning their attention to the door, the dinner guests behold Captain Tiago and a young man named Don Crisóstomo Ibarra. When Tiago announces Ibarra to the crowd,... (full context)
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...of guests either awkwardly ignore him or warmly embrace him. Captain Tinong, a friend of Tiago’s, is one of the ones who jump to make Ibarra’s acquaintance, inviting him to dinner... (full context)
Chapter 3: Dinner
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Captain Tiago stops Ibarra and pleads with him to stay, saying that his daughter, María Clara, will... (full context)
Chapter 5: A Star in the Dark Night
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Ibarra returns to the room where he’s staying. In the distance, Captain Tiago’s house is visible; if Ibarra wanted, he could probably make out the party, where he... (full context)
Chapter 6: Captain Tiago
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Rizal devotes this chapter to describing Captain Tiago, a man of Filipino descent who is considered one of the region’s richest property owners.... (full context)
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Regarding his strong ties to the government, Rizal notes that Tiago is “always ready to obey the army’s lower-ranking officers.” Whenever he hears somebody critique Filipino... (full context)
Chapter 7: Idyll on a Terrace
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...San Diego. At this point, Ibarra arrives, discusses his engagement to María Clara with Captain Tiago, and then goes onto the terrace to speak privately with the young woman herself. Together... (full context)
Chapter 9: National Affairs
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Father Dámaso pulls up to Captain Tiago’s home in his victoria, passing Aunt Isabel and María Clara on his way up the... (full context)
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...María Clara, for then they could be sure he would support the church, given Captain Tiago’s undying devotion. (full context)
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Back at Captain Tiago’s house, Father Dámaso finishes speaking with his host. “You have been warned!” he tells Tiago.... (full context)
Chapter 11: Sovereignty
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San Diego is not run by the figures one might expect. Captain Tiago, for instance, is influential but doesn’t have control. Even the mayor doesn’t command much power,... (full context)
Chapter 27: At Nightfall
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As the town prepares for the fiesta, Captain Tiago also gears up for celebration. He speaks with Ibarra—his future son-in-law—about the school’s name, urging... (full context)
Chapter 34: The Banquet
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...town’s most important people are in attendance, except for Father Dámaso. During the meal, Captain Tiago receives a telegram saying the Captain General will arrive to stay at his house that... (full context)
Chapter 36: The First Cloud
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Ibarra is excommunicated from the church. Captain Tiago’s first response is to forbid María Clara from speaking to Ibarra until this excommunication has... (full context)
Chapter 37: His Excellency
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...the friars, whom he’s reluctant to see. He makes them wait in the antechamber of Tiago’s house (where he’s staying), infuriating them with his lack of respect. When they finally do... (full context)
Chapter 42: The De Espadañas
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The festival finally over, Captain Tiago invites Doctor de Espadaña and his wife, Doña Victorina, to stay with them while the... (full context)
Chapter 43: Plans
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...priest’s advice, but Salví lunges toward him and tells him to get lost. When Captain Tiago, Father Dámaso, and Linares come to see what the commotion is, Salví tells them that... (full context)
Chapter 46: The Cockpit
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...the theater—visit the gambling house, where the townspeople bet on cockfights. While people like Captain Tiago and Captain Basilio throw their money around, the brothers—Társilo and Bruno—speak with Lucas, who tells... (full context)
Chapter 47: Two Ladies
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...I’ll tell him—” At this point, Linares interrupts, telling her not to be “imprudent.” Captain Tiago then enters, and Victorina tells him that Linares is going to challenge the ensign, ordering... (full context)
Chapter 51: Changes
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...support him in the fight, asking himself, “Who will be my second? The priest? Captain Tiago? Damn the day I listen to advice from that jerk! Who made me put on... (full context)
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As Linares worries, Father Salví arrives at the same time as Captain Tiago. The friar tells Tiago that Ibarra’s excommunication has been officially lifted, adding that the young... (full context)
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Ibarra arrives at Captain Tiago’s house and speaks in private with Sinang, who tells him that María Clara—who has just... (full context)
Chapter 55: Catastrophe
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In Captain Tiago’s house, Father Salví paces nervously back and forth, not wanting to leave. María Clara and... (full context)
Chapter 56: What is Said and What is Believed
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...the barracks—has confessed that Ibarra organized the revolt in order to get revenge on Captain Tiago for calling off his wedding and engaging María Clara to Linares. Elsewhere, Lucas’s body is... (full context)
Chapter 59: Homeland and Interests
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...feasts. “Long live Salví!” they chant. Meanwhile, Captain Tinong laments the downfall of his friend Tiago, realizing that he must sever all association with the man because of Tiago’s affiliation with... (full context)
Chapter 60: María Clara Weds
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As for Captain Tiago, he is happy and relieved to see that nobody pays him much attention during these... (full context)
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While Doña Victorina and Captain Tiago discuss plans for María Clara and Linares’s wedding, Aunt Isabel comforts her niece, telling her... (full context)
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...is if she didn’t give him Ibarra’s letter. Because she didn’t want to disgrace Captain Tiago or the memory of her mother, she had no choice but to comply. She knew... (full context)
Chapter 62: Father Dámaso Explains Himself
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Guests stack wedding gifts on a table in Captain Tiago’s house, but María Clara is uninterested in anything other than the newspaper she holds, which... (full context)
Epilogue
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...province, a fate he’s so unhappy about that he dies that very night. Meanwhile, Captain Tiago is so distraught by María Clara’s decision to become a nun that he shuts himself... (full context)