Noli Me Tangere

Noli Me Tangere

An older Filipina woman married to the ensign. Doña Consolación is a brutal, vulgar partner who berates the ensign, engaging him in intense physical fights heard across the town. It is well known that she makes many of the ensign’s decisions, and she even fuels his rivalry with Father Salví, encouraging her husband to take action against the priest to assert his dominance. Rizal depicts Doña Consolación as incredibly crass and very ugly, writing that her one “sterling trait” is that she seems to have “never looked in the mirror.” Much like Doña Victorina, with whom she eventually gets into an intense fight, she believes herself to be much more worthy of respect than she actually is, constantly deceiving herself in regards to her station in life. She even pretends to not remember her native language, Tagalog, instead speaking very bad Spanish.
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Doña Consolación Character Timeline in Noli Me Tangere

The timeline below shows where the character Doña Consolación appears in Noli Me Tangere. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 11: Sovereignty
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...it is well known that the ensign allows himself to be controlled by his wife, Doña Consolación , a Filipina woman who tries to act more sophisticated than she actually is and... (full context)
Chapter 25: At the Philosopher’s House
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...with Elías—the boatman—from “the Muse of the Civil Guard,” his term for the ensign’s wife, Doña Consolación , whom Ibarra neglected to invite to his party. Insulted, Doña Consolación heard about the... (full context)
Chapter 39: Doña Consolación
Isolation Theme Icon
While the town celebrates, the ensign’s house remains dark. Inside, Doña Consolación sleeps in an armchair in unbecoming clothing. That morning, the ensign didn’t allow her to... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Isolation Theme Icon
...leper, Sisa was transported to the military barracks, where she now sings sad songs that Doña Consolación hears. “Get her up here immediately!” the ensign’s wife orders her servants. When the madwoman... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Isolation Theme Icon
Embarrassed by having revealed herself as fluent in Tagalog, Doña Consolación orders Sisa to dance, calling the poor madwoman an “indio whore” and whipping her feet.... (full context)
Chapter 47: Two Ladies
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...and he doesn’t compliment her dress. As they go by the ensign’s house, they see Doña Consolación smoking a cigar in the window. Victorina takes offense that the woman is staring at... (full context)
Chapter 57: Vae Victis
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Revolution and Reform Theme Icon
In the courthouse, Doña Consolación is delighted to witness the interrogation and torture of the prisoners. The court—which includes the... (full context)
Epilogue
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Isolation Theme Icon
...an opium addict. The ensign, basking in his newfound glory, goes to Spain, leaving behind Doña Consolación , who succumbs to drinking and smoking. Father Salví, Rizal adds to this brief summary,... (full context)